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Cannibal Movies

Table of Contents

Cannibal movies are a film genre that have fascinated and disturbed audiences for decades. These films, which often feature scenes of violence and cannibalism, explore themes such as human nature, alienation and fear of the unknown.

History

The cannibal movies genre originated in the 1960s, with films such as Ruggero Deodato’s Country of Wild Sex (1969) and Cannibal Holocaust (1980) by the same director. These films, which were often shot in extreme conditions and with non-professional actors, caused a sensation for their violence and realism.

In the 1970s and 1980s, the cannibal movies genre enjoyed a period of great popularity, with films such as Sergio Martino’s The Mountain of the Cannibal God (1978), Ruggero Deodato’s The Food of the Gods (1979) and The House of horrors (1981) by Umberto Lenzi. These films, often made on limited budgets, featured increasingly extreme scenes of violence and gore.

In the 1990s, the cannibal movies genre began to decline, due to growing public attention towards other genres, such as supernatural horror. However, in recent years, the genre has experienced new interest, with films such as Eli Roth’s The Green Inferno (2013) and Julia Ducournau’s Raw (2016).

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Style

Cannibal-movies

Cannibal movies are often characterized by a gritty and realistic style. Directors of this genre often use techniques such as handheld cameras, fast-paced editing, and dirty photography to create a sense of realism and immersion in the viewer.

Cannibal movies are also often characterized by scenes of extreme violence and gore. These scenes, which are often accompanied by loud sounds and gruesome images, are used to provoke an emotional reaction in the viewer.

The Themes

Cannibal movies explore a number of themes, including:
Human Nature: Cannibal movies often explore the dark and violent nature of man. These films ask the question whether man is naturally inclined to cannibalism or whether it is a tendency that can be repressed.

Alienation: Cannibal movies often explore the theme of alienation. The protagonists of these films are often people who find themselves in extreme situations, such as being lost in the jungle or captured by a cannibalistic tribe. In these situations, the protagonists find themselves isolated and without a point of reference.

Fear of the Unknown: Cannibal movies often explore fear of the unknown. The protagonists of these films often find themselves in unknown and dangerous places, where the rules of civilization do not apply. In these situations, the protagonists must face their fear of the unknown and death.

Cannibal movies are a controversial and fascinating genre. These films, which are often violent and disturbing, explore deep and disturbing themes. Cannibal movies are a genre that will continue to generate interest and debate for many years to come.

Cannibal Movies to Watch

Here is a complete list of cannibal movies to see, divided by year of release.

Man From Deep River (1969) 

Man From Deep River is a 1969 Italian exploitation film directed by Umberto Lenzi. The film is set in a remote jungle in Burma and tells the story of an English photographer, John Bradley, who is captured by a cannibal tribe.

Plot

John Bradley is an English photographer who is sent to Burma to document the lives of the indigenous tribes. During a journey in the jungle, John kills a man in self-defense. Pursued by the police, John takes refuge in the wild forests, where he is captured by a cannibal tribe.

Initially, the tribe is intent on eating John. However, the daughter of the tribal chief, Anya, falls in love with John and saves him from death. John begins to live with the tribe and adapts to their customs. However, his relationship with Anya is hindered by the male members of the tribe, who are jealous of him.

One day, John is captured by another cannibal tribe. This time, John is forced to participate in a death ritual in which he is sacrificed to a deity. However, Anya manages to save him and the two flee the jungle.

Critical reception

Man From Deep River is a controversial film, which has been criticized for its violence and its sexually explicit portrayal. The film has been accused of exploiting the indigenous people and promoting racial stereotypes.

Despite the criticism, Man From Deep River is an important film in the history of exploitation cinema. The film was one of the earliest examples of cannibal films, a subgenre that reached its peak of popularity in the 1970s.

Cast

  • Ivan Rassimov: John Bradley
  • Me Me Lai: Anya
  • Pratitsak Singhara: Tribal Chief
  • Naing Htoo: Ular
  • Kyaw Myo: Thong
  • Khin Myo: Thu
cult-movie

Cannibal Holocaust (1980) 

Cannibal Holocaust (1980) is an Italian horror film directed by Ruggero Deodato. The film is set in the Amazon rainforest and tells the story of a group of documentary filmmakers who go missing while filming a cannibal tribe.

The film was released to critical and commercial success, but was also highly controversial for its graphic violence and realistic depiction of cannibalism. In some countries, the film was banned or heavily censored.

Plot

A group of documentary filmmakers led by Professor Harold Monroe (Robert Kerman) travel to the Amazon rainforest to film a cannibal tribe. The filmmakers are accompanied by a guide, Fiore (Cannibal Holocaust star Ruggero Deodato), and a soundman, Alan Yates (Perry Pirkanen).

The filmmakers soon lose their way in the jungle and are separated from Fiore. They are eventually captured by the cannibal tribe and subjected to torture and mutilation.

A rescue team led by Professor Monroe’s wife, Faye (Lorena Cacciapaglia), is sent to find the filmmakers. The rescue team finds the filmmakers’ campsite and camera equipment, but the filmmakers themselves are nowhere to be found.

Fiore is eventually found and tells the rescue team that the filmmakers were killed and eaten by the cannibals. However, the rescue team is not convinced and continues their search.

The rescue team eventually finds the cannibals’ village. They find the filmmakers’ remains, but they also find Fiore alive and well. It is revealed that Fiore had betrayed the filmmakers to the cannibals.

Critical reception

Cannibal Holocaust was a critical and commercial success upon its release. The film was praised for its realistic depiction of cannibalism and its disturbing violence. However, the film was also highly controversial for its graphic content.

The film was banned in many countries, including Italy, where it was withdrawn from circulation for several years. The film was also heavily censored in other countries, such as the United States and the United Kingdom.

Legacy

Cannibal Holocaust is considered to be one of the most influential horror films ever made. The film’s graphic violence and realistic depiction of cannibalism helped to define the found footage genre.

The film has also been cited as an influence on other horror films, such as The Blair Witch Project (1999) and Hostel (2005).

The film’s graphic violence and realistic depiction of cannibalism are not for the faint of heart. However, the film is also a powerful and thought-provoking film that raises questions about the nature of humanity and the brutality of which we are capable.

Mountain of the Cannibal God (1978) 

The Mountain of the Cannibal God (1978) is an Italian cannibal horror film directed by Sergio Martino. The film stars Ursula Andress, Stacy Keach, and Claudio Cassinelli.

Plot

Susan Stevenson (Ursula Andress) and her brother Arthur (Claudio Cassinelli) travel to Papua New Guinea in search of her missing husband, Henry (Tom Felleghy), who was leading an expedition to study the local tribes. hide_image

Impossibile trovare l’immagine. Scusa, Bard è ancora un servizio sperimentale.

Upon arriving in Papua New Guinea, Susan and Arthur are joined by a guide named Martin (Stacy Keach). The three of them set off into the jungle, where they soon encounter a group of cannibals.

The cannibals capture Susan and Arthur, and take them to their village. In the village, Susan discovers that Henry has been killed by the cannibals and that his body is being worshipped as a god.

Susan and Arthur are forced to participate in the cannibals’ rituals, including human sacrifice. However, they eventually manage to escape and make their way back to civilization.

Critical reception

The Mountain of the Cannibal God was a critical and commercial success upon its release. The film was praised for its suspenseful plot, its graphic violence, and its performances. However, the film was also criticized for its exploitation of indigenous peoples.

Legacy

The Mountain of the Cannibal God is considered to be one of the most influential cannibal horror films ever made. The film’s graphic violence and its realistic depiction of cannibalism helped to define the genre.

The film has also been cited as an influence on other horror films, such as Cannibal Holocaust (1980) and The Green Inferno (2013).

The Last Cannibal World (1979)

The Last Cannibal World (1979) is an Italian cannibal horror film directed by Antonio Margheriti. The film stars John Richardson, Ivan Rassimov, and Mel Ferrer.

Plot

A group of English archaeologists travel to the Amazon to find the ruins of a lost civilization. The group is led by a professor named John Bradley (John Richardson), who is convinced that the lost civilization practiced cannibalism.

The group soon finds the ruins of the lost civilization, but is quickly attacked by cannibals. The cannibals capture the group and take them to their village.

In the village, the cannibals sacrifice one of the archaeologists, a young man named Alan Yates (David Hess). The other archaeologists manage to escape from the village, but are pursued by the cannibals.

The group eventually manages to escape from the Amazon, but not before having a traumatic experience.

Critical reception

The Last Cannibal World was a critical and commercial success upon its release. The film was praised for its suspenseful plot, its graphic violence, and its performances. However, the film was also criticized for its exploitation of indigenous peoples.

Legacy

The Last Cannibal World is considered to be one of the most influential cannibal horror films ever made. The film’s graphic violence and its realistic depiction of cannibalism helped to define the genre.

Cannibal Ferox (1981) 

Cannibal Ferox (1981) is an Italian cannibal horror film directed by Umberto Lenzi. The film stars Giovanni Lombardo Radice, Lorraine De Selle, and Danilo Mattei.

Plot

Mike Logan (Giovanni Lombardo Radice), a small-time drug dealer in New York City, steals a large sum of money from a Brooklyn gang. To seek refuge from the gang, Mike travels to the Amazon rainforest with his girlfriend Gloria (Lorraine De Selle) and his friend Rudy (Danilo Mattei) in search of emeralds.

In the rainforest, the group encounters a tribe of cannibals. The cannibals capture Mike, Gloria, and Rudy and take them to their village. In the village, the cannibals torture and kill Mike and Gloria. Rudy manages to escape, but he is eventually hunted down and killed by the cannibals.

Critical reception

Cannibal Ferox was a critical and commercial failure upon its release. The film was criticized for its extreme violence and its scenes of real animal cruelty. The film was banned in many countries, including Italy, where it was banned for over 20 years.

Legacy

Cannibal Ferox is considered to be one of the most controversial and extreme horror films ever made. The film’s graphic violence and its scenes of real animal cruelty have made it a cult classic among fans of extreme horror.

Emanuelle and the Last Cannibals (1977)

“Emanuelle and the Last Cannibals” is a 1977 film, written and directed by Joe D’Amato. It is the fifth film in the Emanuelle Black series and falls into the cannibal movies genre.

The story follows the adventures of Emanuelle, a successful photojournalist who, during a trip to Brazil, encounters a cannibal tribe. She decides to document the story of these last cannibals but finds herself having to fight for her own survival.

The film is known for its rather explicit scenes of violence and gore, which have contributed to its controversial reputation within the Emanuelle series. Nevertheless, it achieved moderate commercial success and helped solidify Laura Gemser’s fame as an icon of erotic cinema.

Plot

Emanuelle is a successful photojournalist who, during a trip to Brazil, encounters a cannibal tribe. She decides to document the story of these last cannibals but ends up having to fight for her own survival.

Emanuelle is contacted by Dr. Mark Lester, an anthropologist studying a cannibal tribe in the Amazon. She agrees to accompany him on the expedition, and the two set off into the rainforest.

During their journey, Emanuelle and Lester encounter various dangers, including hostile indigenous people and a group of smugglers. They manage to reach the village of the cannibal tribe but are captured and forced to participate in a sacrificial ritual.

Emanuelle manages to escape from the village but is pursued by the cannibals. With the help of a group of indigenous people, she survives and eventually returns to civilization.

Review

“Emanuelle and the Last Cannibals” is a controversial film but also an effective piece of entertainment. The film is characterized by rather explicit scenes of violence and gore, which may be disturbing to some viewers. However, it is also well-crafted, featuring good cinematography and an engaging soundtrack.

Laura Gemser is the true star of the film, and her performance is magnetic and sensual. Gemser effectively conveys Emanuelle’s fear and determination, and her nude scenes are among the most memorable in the series.

Cannibal Holocaust 2 (1988)

Cannibal Holocaust 2 – The Return, also known as Cannibal Holocaust 2, is a 1988 Italian cannibal adventure film directed by Antonio Climati. It is a sequel to the 1980 cult film Cannibal Holocaust.

The film tells the story of a group of adventurers who venture into the Amazon rainforest to find the cannibalistic natives who killed the crew of the previous film. The group consists of an anthropology professor, a cameraman, a journalist, and a former model.

The group is soon attacked by the natives, who capture and torture them. The professor, the only survivor, is rescued by a group of soldiers.

Cannibal Holocaust 2 is a controversial film, like its predecessor. It has been criticized for its violence and for allegations of the use of real animals.

Plot

It has been five years since the end of Cannibal Holocaust. Professor Harold Monroe, an anthropologist and the protagonist of the first film, is contacted by a New York television station to investigate the disappearance of a group of documentary filmmakers who went to the Amazon rainforest to shoot a film about the indigenous population.

Monroe travels to the Amazon with a cameraman, a journalist, and a former model. The group soon encounters a tribe of cannibalistic natives, who attack them.

Monroe, the only survivor, is rescued by a group of soldiers. The professor tells the soldiers that he saw the cannibalistic natives kill and mutilate the documentary filmmakers.

Criticism

Cannibal Holocaust 2 was a controversial film, like its predecessor. It was criticized for its violence and for allegations of the use of real animals.

The film was accused of being a fake documentary, as some scenes of violence were filmed with special effects. Director Ruggero Deodato denied these allegations, stating that all scenes of violence were filmed with real actors and animals.

Legacy

Cannibal Holocaust 2 is considered a cult film of the exploitation genre. The film has been cited and parodied in numerous film and television works.

Cannibal Apocalypse (1980) 

Cannibal Apocalypse (also known as Apocalypse domani and Invasion of the Flesh Hunters) is a 1980 Italian cannibal horror film directed by Antonio Margheriti (under the pseudonym “Anthony M. Dawson”). The film stars John Saxon and Giovanni Lombardo Radice as two Vietnam War veterans who return home with a virus that turns them into cannibals.

The film begins with a group of American soldiers being captured by the Viet Cong. One of the soldiers, Hopper (Saxon), is subjected to a series of experiments by the Viet Cong, who are trying to develop a new type of biological weapon. Hopper is eventually rescued by his fellow soldiers, but he has become infected with a virus that turns him into a cannibal.

Hopper returns to the United States, where he spreads the virus to his friend and fellow war veteran, George (Radice). The two men begin to attack and eat people, and the virus soon begins to spread throughout the country.

The government tries to contain the outbreak, but it is too late. The virus has already spread too far, and the country is soon overrun by cannibals. The film ends with Hopper and George leading a horde of cannibals in an attack on a city.

Cannibal Apocalypse is a controversial film, known for its extreme violence and gore. The film was banned in several countries, and it has been criticized for its exploitation of the Vietnam War and its negative portrayal of people with disabilities.

Despite its controversy, Cannibal Apocalypse is considered a cult classic among fans of horror cinema. The film is praised for its realistic special effects and its unflinching depiction of human depravity.

Themes

Cannibal Apocalypse explores a number of themes, including the horrors of war, the dangers of biological warfare, and the capacity for human evil. The film also examines the breakdown of society and the loss of humanity in the face of a crisis.

Critical reception

Cannibal Apocalypse was met with mixed reviews upon its release. Some critics praised the film’s realism and its unflinching depiction of human depravity, while others criticized its violence and exploitation.

In recent years, the film has been reassessed by critics, and it is now considered a cult classic among fans of horror cinema. The film is praised for its realistic special effects and its unflinching depiction of human depravity.

Delicatessen (1991) 

Delicatessen (1991) is a French post-apocalyptic black comedy film directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet and Marc Caro. It stars Dominique Pinon as Louison, an unemployed circus clown who takes a job as a handyman in a dilapidated apartment building run by a cannibalistic butcher, Clapet (Jean-Claude Dreyfus). Louison soon falls in love with Clapet’s daughter Julie (Marie-Laure Dougnac), and together they hatch a plan to escape from the building.

The film is notable for its dark humor, its bizarre visuals, and its eclectic cast of characters. It was a critical and commercial success upon its release, and it has since become a cult classic.

The film is set in a post-apocalyptic world where food is scarce and meat is a luxury item. Clapet’s apartment building is a microcosm of this world, with its tenants living in constant fear of being eaten.

Louison is a kind and gentle soul, and he quickly becomes a friend to many of the tenants, including Julie. Julie is a rebellious young woman who is determined to escape from her father’s clutches. Together, they hatch a plan to smuggle Louison out of the building in a crate of meat.

However, their plan is complicated by the fact that Clapet is becoming increasingly suspicious of Louison. He also has to deal with a group of troglodytes who live in the sewers beneath the building.

The film is a visually stunning and darkly funny exploration of themes such as hunger, survival, and love. It is a unique and unforgettable film that has something to offer everyone.

Critical reception

Delicatessen was met with critical acclaim upon its release. It was praised for its dark humor, its bizarre visuals, and its eclectic cast of characters. The film was nominated for several awards, including the César Award for Best Film and the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Box office

Delicatessen was a commercial success in France, grossing over 100 million francs. It was also a modest success in the United States, grossing over $1 million.

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

The Silence of the Lambs is a 1991 American psychological thriller film directed by Jonathan Demme and starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Scott Glenn, and Ted Levine. It is based on the 1988 novel of the same name by Thomas Harris, and follows the story of Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee who is tasked with interviewing Hannibal Lecter, a brilliant and manipulative cannibalistic psychiatrist, in order to obtain information about another serial killer known as Buffalo Bill.

The film was a critical and commercial success, winning five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay. It was also a commercial success, grossing over $273 million worldwide.

Plot

The story begins with Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee, being assigned to the case of Buffalo Bill, a serial killer who murders young, attractive women by skinning them and wearing their skins. Clarice’s boss, Jack Crawford, asks her to interview Hannibal Lecter, a dangerous cannibalistic serial killer who is being held in a maximum-security psychiatric hospital.

Clarice travels to Baltimore and meets Lecter for the first time. Lecter is an intelligent and manipulative man who enjoys playing with Clarice. However, Clarice is determined to get the information she needs from Lecter, and she eventually succeeds.

Lecter reveals to her that Buffalo Bill is a man who was mutilated as a child. Buffalo Bill believes that by wearing the skins of his victims, he will finally feel complete. Clarice uses this information to track down Buffalo Bill and stop him.

Critical reception

The Silence of the Lambs was met with critical acclaim. The film was praised for its performances, direction, and screenplay. Jodie Foster received praise for her performance as Clarice Starling, and Anthony Hopkins won the Academy Award for his performance as Hannibal Lecter.

The film was also praised for its disturbing portrayal of the mind of a serial killer. The film is a psychological thriller that explores themes such as the nature of evil, identity, and survival.

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Manhunter (1986)

Manhunter is a 1986 American psychological thriller film directed by Michael Mann and starring William L. Petersen, Brian Cox, Tom Noonan, and Kim Greist. It is based on the 1981 novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, and follows the story of Will Graham, a retired FBI criminal profiler who is brought back in to help catch a serial killer known as the Tooth Fairy.

Plot

Will Graham is a retired FBI criminal profiler who is living a quiet life with his wife, Molly, and their son. However, he is called back into action when the FBI needs his help to catch a serial killer known as the Tooth Fairy.

The Tooth Fairy is a sadistic killer who murders families in their homes. Graham uses his profiling skills to identify the killer as Francis Dollarhyde, a disturbed man who is obsessed with William Blake’s painting The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed with the Sun.

Graham contacts Dollarhyde and begins a psychological game of cat-and-mouse with him. Dollarhyde is initially amused by Graham, but he eventually becomes obsessed with him. Graham is able to use Dollarhyde’s obsession to his advantage, and he eventually captures him.

Critical reception

Manhunter was met with mixed reviews upon its release. Some critics praised the film’s dark and atmospheric tone, its realistic portrayal of criminal profiling, and its performances. However, other critics criticized the film’s violence and its bleak ending.

Despite its mixed reception, Manhunter has since been recognized as a classic of the psychological thriller genre. The film is praised for its innovative use of visual imagery, its complex characters, and its disturbing exploration of the human psyche.

Hannibal (2001)

Hannibal is a 2001 American psychological thriller film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Anthony Hopkins and Julianne Moore. It is based on the 1999 novel of the same name by Thomas Harris, and is the sequel to the 1991 film The Silence of the Lambs.

Plot

The film follows the story of Dr. Clarice Starling, an FBI agent who is still haunted by her encounter with Dr. Hannibal Lecter, a brilliant and manipulative cannibalistic psychiatrist. Lecter has escaped from prison and fled to Europe, where he is living under a new identity.

Starling is assigned to a new case involving a wealthy Italian businessman named Mason Verger, who is the victim of a series of gruesome attacks. Verger believes that Lecter is responsible for the attacks, and he hires a team of bounty hunters to capture him.

Starling is also tasked with tracking down Lecter, and she eventually catches up with him in Florence, Italy. Lecter is initially reluctant to cooperate with Starling, but he eventually agrees to help her catch Verger in exchange for her help in escaping from Europe.

Critical reception

Hannibal was met with mixed reviews upon its release. Some critics praised the film’s visual style, its performances, and its suspenseful plot. However, other critics criticized the film’s violence and its bleak ending.

Despite its mixed reception, Hannibal has since been recognized as a cult classic of the psychological thriller genre. The film is praised for its dark and atmospheric tone, its complex characters, and its disturbing exploration of the human psyche.

Hannibal Rising (2007)

Hannibal Rising is a 2007 French-British psychological thriller film directed by Peter Webber and starring Gaspard Ulliel as Hannibal Lecter. It is based on the 2001 novel of the same name by Thomas Harris, and is a prequel to the Hannibal film series.

Plot

The film tells the story of Hannibal Lecter’s childhood and adolescence in Lithuania during World War II. Lecter witnesses the brutal murder of his parents by Nazi soldiers, and he and his younger sister Mischa are taken in by a group of cannibals who slaughter and eat them.

Lecter survives the massacre, but he is traumatized by the experience. He develops a taste for human flesh and a deep hatred of Nazis. After the war, Lecter is adopted by wealthy French relatives, but he continues to be haunted by his past.

As a teenager, Lecter begins to take revenge on the Nazis who killed his parents. He also begins to develop his skills as a serial killer. The film follows Lecter as he transforms from a traumatized child into a cold-blooded killer.

Critical reception

Hannibal Rising was met with negative reviews upon its release. Critics criticized the film’s plot, its characters, and its direction. The film was also a box office failure.

Despite its negative reception, Hannibal Rising has since been recognized as a cult film by some fans of the Hannibal film series. The film is praised for its dark and atmospheric tone, its disturbing imagery, and its performance by Gaspard Ulliel as Hannibal Lecter.

The Green Inferno (2013) 

The Green Inferno (2013) is an American cannibal horror film directed by Eli Roth and starring Lorenza Izzo, Ariel Levy, and Aaron Yoo. The film follows a group of American college students who travel to the Amazon rainforest to protest against a company that is destroying the rainforest. However, their plane crashes and they are captured by a tribe of cannibals.

The film was inspired by Italian cannibal films from the 1970s and 1980s, such as Cannibal Holocaust and I Cannibals. It is known for its graphic violence and disturbing imagery.

Critical reception

The Green Inferno received mixed reviews from critics. Some praised the film’s direction, performances, and realism, while others criticized its violence and exploitation of indigenous cultures.

Legacy

The Green Inferno has become a cult film among fans of horror cinema. It is praised for its unflinching portrayal of cannibalism and its commentary on environmental destruction.

Some additional details about the film

  • The film was shot in Peru and the Dominican Republic.
  • The film was released in the United States on September 24, 2015.
  • The film was distributed by Dimension Films.
  • The film was rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for “strong, brutal violence and gore, disturbing images, language, and some sexual content”.
  • The film was a box office failure, grossing only $3.3 million worldwide.

The Bad Batch (2016) 

The Bad Batch (2016) is a dystopian film written and directed by Ana Lily Amirpour. The film stars Suki Waterhouse as Arlen, a young woman who is banished from her community and forced to wander the desert. She eventually meets Miami Man (Jason Momoa), a mysterious stranger who helps her to survive.

The film has been praised for its unique visual style and its exploration of themes such as gender, violence, and community. It has also been criticized for its slow pace and its lack of plot.

Plot

The film opens with Arlen being banished from her community for an unknown reason. She is left to wander the desert alone, where she is eventually attacked by a group of cannibals. She is rescued by Miami Man, who takes her to his home in a nearby town.

The town is a strange and dangerous place, where the law of the jungle seems to prevail. Arlen soon learns that she must be tough and resourceful in order to survive. She also begins to develop a relationship with Miami Man, who is drawn to her strength and independence.

One day, Arlen and Miami Man discover a group of children who are being held captive by the cannibals. They decide to rescue the children and take them to a safe place. However, they are soon pursued by the cannibals, who are determined to stop them.

Critical reception

The Bad Batch received mixed reviews from critics. Some praised the film’s unique visual style and its exploration of themes such as gender, violence, and community. Others criticized the film’s slow pace and its lack of plot.

Legacy

The Bad Batch has become a cult film among fans of independent cinema. It is praised for its unique vision and its willingness to take risks.

Some additional details about the film

  • The film was shot in Texas and New Mexico.
  • The film was released in the United States on August 19, 2016.
  • The film was distributed by Neon.
  • The film was rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for “strong violence, disturbing images, language, some sexual content, and graphic nudity”.
  • The film was a box office failure, grossing only $72,000 worldwide.

Raw (2016)

Raw (2016) is a French coming-of-age body horror drama film written and directed by Julia Ducournau, and starring Garance Marillier, Ella Rumpf, and Rabah Nait Oufella. It tells the story of Justine, a young vegetarian woman who succumbs to her cannibalistic urges after entering veterinary school.

The film was praised for its unique and disturbing take on the coming-of-age story, as well as its strong performances and visceral imagery. It was also a critical and commercial success, winning the FIPRESCI Prize at the 69th Cannes Film Festival and grossing over $1.5 million at the box office.

Plot

Justine is a young vegetarian woman who has just been accepted into veterinary school. She comes from a family of vegetarians, and her parents are both veterinarians. Justine is excited to start her new life, but she is also nervous about the challenges that lie ahead.

On her first day of school, Justine is forced to participate in a hazing ritual that involves eating raw meat. She initially refuses, but she is eventually pressured into eating a piece of raw rabbit. This act of cannibalism awakens Justine’s dormant cannibalistic urges, and she begins to crave human flesh.

Justine’s descent into cannibalism is paralleled by her growing sexual awakening. She is attracted to her classmate Émilie, a confident and rebellious young woman. Justine and Émilie begin a passionate relationship, but Justine’s cannibalistic urges threaten to destroy their bond.

Critical reception

Raw was met with critical acclaim upon its release. Critics praised the film’s unique and disturbing take on the coming-of-age story, as well as its strong performances and visceral imagery. The film was also a critical and commercial success, winning the FIPRESCI Prize at the 69th Cannes Film Festival and grossing over $1.5 million at the box office.

Bone Tomahawk (2015) 

Bone Tomahawk (2015) is a Western horror film written and directed by S. Craig Zahler, and starring Kurt Russell, Patrick Wilson, Matthew Fox, and Richard Jenkins. It follows a group of cowboys who set out to rescue a kidnapped woman from a tribe of troglodyte cannibals.

The film was praised for its unique blend of Western and horror genres, its gritty realism, and its strong performances. It was also a critical and commercial success, grossing over $2 million at the box office.

Plot

In the Old West, two outlaws, Purvis (David Arquette) and Buddy (Sid Haig), are captured by a group of cannibals. Purvis is killed, but Buddy escapes with his life.

Meanwhile, Bright Hope, a small town in the American frontier, is attacked by the same group of cannibals. They kidnap several people, including Samantha O’Dwyer (Lili Simmons), the wife of Sheriff Franklin Hunt (Kurt Russell).

Sheriff Hunt teams up with his deputy Chicory (Patrick Wilson), gunfighter John Brooder (Matthew Fox), and Arthur O’Dwyer (Richard Jenkins), Samantha’s father, to rescue the kidnapped townspeople.

The group sets out on a dangerous journey across the desert to track down the cannibals. Along the way, they must face the harsh elements, hostile Native American tribes, and the cannibals themselves.

Critical reception

Bone Tomahawk was met with critical acclaim upon its release. Critics praised the film’s unique blend of Western and horror genres, its gritty realism, and its strong performances. The film was also a critical and commercial success, grossing over $2 million at the box office.

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (2003)

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (2003) is a 2003 American slasher film directed by Marcus Nispel and starring Jessica Biel, Eric Balfour, Jonathan Tucker, Andrew Bryniarski, and Erica Leerhsen. A remake of the 1974 film of the same name, the film follows a group of five friends who go on a road trip to visit the grave of an ancestor in Texas. Along the way, they encounter a family of cannibals who stalk and kill them one by one.

The film was praised for its realistic violence and its unsettling atmosphere. It was also a commercial success, grossing over $107 million worldwide.

Plot

Erin (Jessica Biel), her brother Morgan (Eric Balfour), their friends Andy (Jonathan Tucker), Holden (Andrew Bryniarski), and Pepper (Erica Leerhsen) are on a road trip to visit the grave of an ancestor in Texas. Along the way, they stop for gas at a gas station run by a creepy man named Thomas Hewitt (Andrew Bryniarski).

Thomas is actually one of the members of a cannibalistic family that lives nearby. When Erin and her friends discover the truth, they are forced to fight for their lives.

Critical reception

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (2003) was praised for its realistic violence and its unsettling atmosphere. Critics also praised the performances of Jessica Biel and Andrew Bryniarski.

The film was a commercial success, grossing over $107 million worldwide.

Legacy

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (2003) has become a cult classic among horror fans. It was followed by a sequel, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006), and a reboot, Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2022).

Additional details about the film

  • The film was shot in Texas and Louisiana.
  • The film was released in the United States on October 18, 2003.
  • The film was distributed by New Line Cinema.
  • The film was rated R by the Motion Picture Association of America for “strong violence, disturbing images, and language.”
  • The film was a commercial success, grossing over $107 million worldwide.

The Hills Have Eyes (2006) 

The Hills Have Eyes (2006) is a 2006 American slasher film directed by Alexandre Aja and starring Ted Levine, Kathleen Quinlan, Emilie de Ravin, Dan Byrd, Vinessa Shaw, and Bailee Madison. A remake of the 1977 film of the same name, the film follows a family who becomes trapped in an abandoned nuclear test site, where they are attacked by a family of mutant cannibals.

Plot

The Carter family, consisting of Big Bob (Ted Levine), Ethel (Kathleen Quinlan), Brenda (Emilie de Ravin), Bobby (Dan Byrd), Lynn (Vinessa Shaw), and Brenda Jr. (Bailee Madison), is on a road trip to Mexico. Along the way, they stop for gas in a small town.

After gassing up, the family heads into the desert. However, they get lost and end up in an abandoned nuclear test site.

The Carter family is soon attacked by a family of mutant cannibals. The mutants begin to kill the family members one by one, leaving only Big Bob, Ethel, and Lynn to fight for their lives.

Critical reception

The Hills Have Eyes (2006) was praised for its realistic violence and its unsettling atmosphere. Critics also praised the performances of Ted Levine, Kathleen Quinlan, and Vinessa Shaw.

The film was a commercial success, grossing over $97 million worldwide.

The Last House on the Left (2009) 

The Last House on the Left (2009) is a 2009 American psychological horror film directed by Dennis Iliadis and starring Tony Goldwyn, Monica Potter, Sara Paxton, Garrett Dillahunt, and Spencer Treat Clark. It is a remake of the 1972 film of the same name.

The film follows a young woman named Mari Collingwood (Sara Paxton) who is kidnapped by two escaped convicts, Krug (Garrett Dillahunt) and Justin (Spencer Treat Clark). Mari is tortured and raped by the two men, and her friend Phyllis (Martha MacIsaac) is murdered. Mari eventually escapes and returns home, where her parents, John (Tony Goldwyn) and Emma (Monica Potter), are preparing to celebrate her birthday.

When John and Emma learn of Mari’s ordeal, they are consumed by grief and rage. They decide to take revenge on Krug and Justin, and they lure the two men to their home. John and Emma torture and kill Krug and Justin in a brutal and sadistic manner.

The film was praised for its strong performances, particularly those of Sara Paxton and Tony Goldwyn. It was also praised for its realistic depiction of violence and its unflinching exploration of themes such as revenge, grief, and trauma. However, the film was also criticized for its extreme violence and its bleak and nihilistic tone.

Critical reception

The Last House on the Left (2009) received mixed reviews from critics. Some praised the film’s strong performances and realistic depiction of violence, while others criticized its extreme violence and bleak tone.

The film holds a 52% rating on the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 130 reviews. The critical consensus reads: “The Last House on the Left is a well-acted and technically proficient remake, but it’s also incredibly brutal and bleak, and it offers little to redeem itself.”

The film was also a commercial success, grossing over $46 million worldwide against a budget of $15 million.

The Human Centipede (2009) 

The Human Centipede (First Sequence) (2009) is a Dutch-German-British body horror film written and directed by Tom Six. The film follows a German doctor named Josef Heiter (Dieter Laser) who kidnaps three people and surgically joins them mouth-to-anus to create a human centipede.

The film was released to critical and commercial failure, but it has since become a cult classic among fans of extreme horror. It is known for its graphic violence and its disturbing premise.

Plot

Josef Heiter is a retired German surgeon who has become obsessed with creating a human centipede. He kidnaps three tourists: an American couple, Lindsay (Ashley C. Williams) and Jenny (Ashlynn Yennie), and a Japanese man named Katsuro (Akihiro Kitamura).

Heiter takes his victims to his remote villa, where he drugs them and performs the surgery. He joins them together in a linear fashion, with Lindsay’s mouth connected to Katsuro’s anus, and Katsuro’s mouth connected to Jenny’s anus.

Heiter then forces the human centipede to crawl through his house and eat his feces. He also sexually abuses them.

Critical reception

The Human Centipede (First Sequence) was met with widespread critical condemnation. Critics were disgusted by the film’s graphic violence and its disturbing premise. Many critics also accused the film of being exploitative and misogynistic.

The film was also a commercial failure, grossing only $1.3 million worldwide against a budget of $1 million.

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