Carl Theodor Dreyer

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Outside of this rich scenario of European French, German and Russian avant-gardes and the development of American cinema, there is a long series of individual experiences of directors operating in other countries, such as Carl Theodor Dreyer.

In Italy in the 1920s everything seems to have stopped and there is a profound production and distribution crisis. The concentration of cinematographic activities in Rome seems to be holding back creativity and connections with other European cinemas. 

Even British cinema does not express cinematic movements and noteworthy avant-gardes but in those years he began his career as one of the greatest directors in the history of cinema Alfred Hitchcock. It is above all in Northern Europe that we find the most important filmmakers who work in solitude: Dreyer, Sjostrom, Christensen.

Dreyer, Director of Ascetic Cinema

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Solitary master of Scandinavian cinema and in recent years Carl Th. Dreyer, director who first worked in Sweden and Denmark and then moved to France, made important films such as Blade of Satan bog, from 1920, The master of the house from 1925 is an absolute masterpiece of silent cinema, The passion of Joan of Arc from 1928. 

Carl Theodor Dreyer is one of the most important directors of world cinema. Master of a very rigorous, ascetic and moral style, he explores in depth important themes of the human soul such as faith, love and death. Dreyer always rejected the easy shortcut of commercial cinema.

In fact, his films did not have great success with the public and were long opposed by censorship as in the case of The Passion of Joan of Arc, which was banned by the Catholic Church. Many modern directors have explicitly stated that they were influenced and inspired by his style. 

Dreyer was born in Copenhagen in Denmark on February 3, 1889 to a humble peasant family who gave him a strict Lutheran upbringing. An education that subsequently influenced the making of his films. In his youth he worked as a journalist and encountered cinema by subtitling silent films and writing screenplays.

Success came with the 1925 film The master of the house, very popular especially in France. Thanks to this success he had the opportunity to realize his most important work, commissioned by the French production Société General des films, The Passion of Joan of Arc, which I personally also edit.

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Dreyer’s Films

The President (1919)

The President is a 1919 Danish silent drama film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer and based on a novel by Karl Emil Franzos. It is Dreyer’s debut film and has been praised for its psychological complexity and its refined visual effects.

The film tells the story of the presiding judge Franz Victor von Sendlingen, who must judge his own illegitimate daughter, Anna. Anna is accused of having killed her newborn child and Franz Victor is convinced that she is guilty. However, he is also torn between his duty as a judge and his love for his daughter.

The film was shot during the summer of 1918 on Gotland, Sweden. It had its premiere in Sweden in February 1919, but only a year later in Denmark.

Plot

The film opens with a scene in which Franz Victor von Sendlingen is sitting in his courtroom and sentencing a man to death. He is a stern and just judge, known for his impartiality.

One day, Franz Victor’s daughter, Anna, is accused of having killed her newborn child. Franz Victor is convinced that Anna is guilty and he is determined to have her convicted.

Anna, however, is innocent and refuses to admit anything. She is also afraid of her father and tries to avoid him.

During the trial, Franz Victor is confronted with his own past. He realizes that he has himself betrayed his daughter and he begins to doubt his own justice.

Analysis

The President is a complex film that explores themes such as guilt, shame, and reconciliation. The film is also an investigation of human nature and the dilemmas we face.

The film has been praised for its psychological complexity and its refined visual effects. Dreyer uses, among other things, slow pans and close-ups to create a sense of intensity and claustrophobia.

The President is an important film in Danish cinema history and is still relevant today. The film is a powerful representation of human feelings and dilemmas, and it is a reminder that even the most just people can make mistakes.

Awards

The President won two awards at the Nordisk Film Prisen in 1919: best film and best leading actor (Halvard Hoff).

The film was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1920.

Reception

The President was well-received by critics when it was released. The film was praised for its psychological complexity and its refined visual effects.

The film has also had a major influence on later filmmakers. Dreyer himself cited The President as a source of inspiration for his later films, including Day of Wrath (1943) and The Word (1955).

The Pastor’s Widow (1920)

Plot

A post for a Protestant pastor has become vacant in a village, and the young aspiring Söfren goes there, accompanied by his girlfriend Mari. The job is essential for him: in fact, Söfren’s father has forbidden him to marry Mari before becoming a pastor.

Söfren is hired and moves into the parsonage with Mari. The two young people are happy and in love, but their happiness is threatened by the presence of Margarete, the parsonage’s housekeeper. Margarete is an authoritarian and bigoted woman who disapproves of Söfren and Mari’s relationship.

One day, Mari is accused of having killed the child she was expecting from Söfren. Söfren is shocked and does not believe in the guilt of his beloved. However, he is forced to defend himself from the accusations and to take Mari to court.

At the trial, Söfren is the only one who believes in Mari’s innocence. Margarete, on the other hand, is determined to have her convicted. In the end, Mari is acquitted, but her life is destroyed.

Analysis

The Pastor’s Widow is a dramatic film that explores themes such as love, justice, and religion. The film is also a critique of puritanism and hypocrisy.

The film has been praised for its gripping story, masterful direction, and convincing performances.

Awards

  • The Pastor’s Widow won the award for best film at the Venice Film Festival in 1920.
  • The film was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1921.

Blade af Satans Bog (1921)

Plot

The film is divided into four episodes, set in different eras:

  • The betrayal of Judas: Judas Iscariot is incited by Satan to betray Jesus Christ.
  • The Spanish Inquisition: A monk is tortured and killed by the Inquisition, who accuses him of heresy.
  • The French Revolution: A commissioner of the National Convention condemns an innocent man to death, in the name of the revolution.
  • The Finnish Civil War: A Finnish soldier is killed by a Russian soldier, in the name of the motherland.

In each episode, Satan is present as an evil force that tempts men and leads them to evil.

Analysis

Blade af Satans Bog is a symbolic film that explores the themes of evil, sin, and guilt. The film is influenced by German Expressionist cinema, and uses a series of visual techniques to create an unsettling and oppressive atmosphere.

The film has been praised for its originality and visual power.

Awards

  • Blade af Satans Bog won the award for best foreign film at the Venice Film Festival in 1921.
  • The film was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1922.
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The Stigmatized (1922)

Plot

The film is set in a small Russian village during World War I. Hanne-Liebe is a young woman who lives with her father, a farmer. Hanne-Liebe is a pious and devout woman, and she believes firmly in God.

One day, Hanne-Liebe is visited by an angel, who tells her that she has been chosen to bear the stigmata. Hanne-Liebe is initially reluctant, but she eventually accepts her fate.

Hanne-Liebe’s stigmata attract the attention of the village, and she becomes a controversial figure. Some consider her a saint, while others consider her crazy.

Hanne-Liebe continues to bear the stigmata for the rest of her life, and she dies in the odor of sanctity.

Analysis

The Stigmatized is a religious film that explores the themes of faith, suffering, and redemption. The film is influenced by German Expressionist cinema, and uses a series of visual techniques to create a suggestive and spiritual atmosphere.

The film has been praised for its originality and visual power.

Awards

  • The Stigmatized won the award for best foreign film at the Venice Film Festival in 1922.
  • The film was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1923.

Once Upon a Time (1922)

Plot

The film is set in an imaginary kingdom, and tells the story of a beautiful and vain princess who rejects all her suitors. The princess, named Armonica, is a young woman who is arrogant and superficial. She believes that she is the most beautiful woman in the world, and she believes that no man is worthy of her.

One day, a wizard gives the prince of Denmark an enchanted kettle that allows him to spend the night in the princess’s bedroom disguised as a beggar. The prince, named Svend, is a young man who is kind and compassionate. He is attracted to Armonica’s beauty, but he is also intrigued by her complex nature.

Svend spends the night in the princess’s bedroom, and the two fall in love. Armonica is fascinated by Svend’s kindness and compassion, and she begins to see the world in a new way.

Analysis

Once Upon a Time is a fairy tale film that explores the themes of love, appearance, and reality. The film was directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer, one of the most important directors of silent cinema.

The film is a metaphor for love that transcends appearances. Armonica is a woman who has been conditioned by her beauty to believe that she is superior to others. However, Svend’s love allows her to see the world in a new way, and to discover her true nature.

The film is also a reflection on the nature of appearance. Armonica is a woman who has been conditioned to believe that beauty is everything. However, the film shows that beauty is only an illusion, and that what is truly important is love.

Awards

  • Once Upon a Time won the award for best foreign film at the Venice Film Festival in 1922.

Once Upon a Time is a classic film of silent cinema. The film is a visual work of art, and Dreyer’s direction is masterful. The film is also a touching and engaging love story.

Michael (1924)

Michael (1924) is a Danish silent drama film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. It is based on the novel “Mikael” (1904) by Herman Bang.

Plot

The film tells the story of Michael, a homosexual painter who falls in love with a young model named Allan. Michael is a complex and tormented man, who struggles to accept his homosexuality. Allan, on the other hand, is an innocent and naive young man, who is attracted to Michael but does not understand his nature.

The relationship between Michael and Allan is obstructed by society, which does not accept homosexuality. The two men are forced to live their relationship in secret, and this leads to a series of conflicts and tragedies.

Analysis

Michael is an important film for its exploration of the theme of homosexuality. The film was made in an era when homosexuality was still illegal and stigmatized, and Dreyer had the courage to address this topic in a direct and uncompromising way.

The film is also a visual work of art, and Dreyer’s direction is masterful. Dreyer uses a variety of cinematic techniques to create an intense and claustrophobic atmosphere, which reflects the tormented inner lives of the characters.

Awards

  • Michael was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1925.
  • The film is considered a classic of silent cinema.

Michael is a powerful and moving film that explores universal themes such as love, loss, and acceptance. It is a film that has stood the test of time, and continues to be relevant today as it was when it was made.

The Master of the House (1925)

Plot

The film is set in Denmark during the economic crisis of 1922. Viktor Frandsen is a father of a family who loses his job and faces financial difficulties. His wife, Ida, is a strong and determined woman who tries to help her husband.

The financial problems lead Viktor to become a harsh and irritable man. He begins to mistreat his family and the nanny, Alvilda. Alvilda is a kind and compassionate woman who tries to help Viktor overcome his difficulties.

Analysis

The Master of the House is a drama film that explores the themes of family, economic crisis, and redemption. The film was directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer, one of the most important directors of silent cinema.

The film is a realistic portrayal of life in Denmark during the economic crisis of 1922. The film shows how the economic crisis can lead to family tensions and the loss of values.

The film is also a story of redemption. Viktor is a man who has made mistakes, but who is able to find the strength to change. The film shows how love and forgiveness can lead to transformation.

Awards

  • The Master of the House won the award for best foreign film at the Venice Film Festival in 1925.
  • The film is considered a classic of silent cinema.

The Bride of Glomdal (1925)

Plot

The film is set in Norway, in a small rural village. Tore Braaten is a young farmer who returns to his hometown after working as a farm laborer for several years. Here he finds Berit Glomgaarden, his childhood playmate. The two love each other and plan to get married.

However, Berit’s father, a wealthy landowner, has already promised his daughter in marriage to Gjermund Haugsett, another young farmer. Berit is forced to accept her father’s arranged marriage, but she is deeply unhappy.

On the day of the wedding, Berit runs away from home and takes refuge at Tore’s house. The two young people marry in secret, but their happiness is short-lived. Berit’s father discovers their union and has Tore arrested.

Tore is sentenced to a year in prison. Berit, left alone, is forced to work hard to support the family. In the end, Tore is released from prison and the two young people can finally live together.

Analysis

The Bride of Glomdal is a drama film that explores the themes of love, family, and society. The film was directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer, one of the most important directors of silent cinema.

The film is a realistic portrayal of rural life in Norway at the beginning of the 20th century. The film shows how society can hinder love and happiness for individuals.

The film is also a story of love and resilience. Tore and Berit are two young people who fight for their love and for their happiness. Their love is a powerful force that can overcome difficulties and win.

Awards

  • The Bride of Glomdal won the award for best foreign film at the Venice Film Festival in 1926.
  • The film is considered a classic of silent cinema.

The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928)

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The Passion of Joan of Arc is one of the absolutely unmissable films of silent cinema and made by Dreyer with the collaboration of a technical staff of the highest level such as the director of photography Rudolph Matè.

The film has a great religious and moral inspiration and is an exemplary synthesis of all the most innovative techniques and cinematographic styles seen up to that moment. The process is shown with a variety of shots of extreme geometric angles and rapid editing that render the tragedy and pain of the affair with extreme power. 

The Passion of Joan of Arc is a film in which the best of the experimentation of all the European avant-gardes is condensed. Perhaps the film in which silent cinema reaches its maximum expression. A film of absolute rigor with sets almost reduced to zero. White backgrounds and long shadows that evoke the tragedy of the story. 

At times an exemplary kammerspiel built above all with close-ups of the actress Renée Falconetti, without any makeup, with all the imperfections of your face. Threatening and crooked shots of the inquisitors and intense close-ups of Giovanna D’Arco, of her eyes that almost allow us to scrutinize her soul.

In the torture scene, Dreyer seems to be inspired by the Soviet avant-gardes and German expressionism. For the editing of the scenes in the torture chamber, Dreyer seems to be inspired by the Soviet and Impressionist style.

The Censorship of Dreyer’s Masterpiece

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The only original screening of the film was at its premier in Copenhagen in 1928. After that the passion of Joan of Arc met a series of incredible vicissitudes and the total opposition of the Catholic Church. First censored and reassembled in France by order of the archbishop of Paris, the negative of the original copy was mysteriously destroyed in a fire at the UFA in Berlin.

Dreyer reassembled an alternative version with scenes not used but incredibly after a few months this too was destroyed in a fire. The hapless director never got to see the success of his masterpiece. 

Only in 1951 the film historian Lo Duca found a copy of a second version in the basement of the Gaumont, to which he will add a soundtrack and which will remain the only available version of the film for many years.

The epilogue, however, is a real cinematic twist: a copy in excellent condition was found by chance in a psychiatric hospital in Oslo. It was the original negative of the copy lost in the Berlin fire. 

Vampyr (1932)

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In the thirties Dreyer created another masterpiece, Vampyr, from 1932, which moved away from the codes of the horror genre of the time to propose a very personal story of madness and terror. A way of telling with disturbing images that manages to create an authentic restlessness and a sense of threat in the viewer that goes beyond the genre. 

The credibility Dreyer had earned with Joan of Arc’s passion did not easily allow him to make a new film. The public had not rewarded him at the cinema box office due to his difficult style and alien to commercial dynamics.

It was only thanks to the interest of a patron, the young Baron Nicolas de Gunzburg, that the director was able to make his next film on a very low budget, inspired by the stories of an Irish writer of the 1800s, Sheridan Le Fanu.

A film that deals with occultism and demonology and draws a fresco of the darkest tradition of German and Anglo-Saxon Romanticism. Vampyr was presented in Berlin in the spring of 1932. The film is an epitome of Dreyer’s obsessions that oscillate between dream and reality. 

The Story of Dreyer’s Vampyr

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It is the story of a real and concrete horror that the protagonist encounters on his journey. David Gray happens by chance in a small village shrouded in fog and an evil atmosphere.

He decides to spend the night in a gloomy inn and receives an unexpected visit from an old gentleman who leaves him a package. Above it is written that it will only have to be opened after his death. 

Then the man disappears. The young man tries to find the mysterious character by leaving the inn and meets mysterious presences that show him where to find him. Then he comes to a ruined building apparently uninhabited but actually populated by evil spirits.

Gray will continue his journey until he comes across the murder of the old gentleman who had given him the package which, once opened, reveals inside it the presence of a book: The Strange Story of Vampires.

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Dreyer’s Style in Vampyr

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The original title of the film is The Dream of Allan Gray and it reveals the dream and nightmare dimension in which the film is set. There is no trace of logic and rationality at all.

The plot serves as a pretext for Dreyer to create a series of exceptional dream visual inventions that after 90 years still amaze audiences and filmmakers around the world. Each scene really seems to emerge from the deepest and darkest subconscious of the protagonist. 

Unfortunately, once again, the public does not fully understand Dreyer’s cinema and the film turns out to be a resounding failure, causing a depression to the director.

Many years will have to pass for Vampyr to be widely re-evaluated by film critics and become one of the fundamental works in the history of cinema, in particular of Horror cinema, together with Murnau’s Nosferatu and Tod Browning’s Dracula. 

Films that have given inspiration and inspiration for many horror films of the following decades. Dreyer’s Vampyr, however, is very different from both Murnau’s and Browning’s films and differs more generally from the canons of Horror cinema. 

Dreyer’s Choices on Dialogues

It is basically an experimental film on the psyche and dream images immersed in a suspended and unreal atmosphere. Dreyer had faced the difficulty of making the film in three different languages ​​in order to be able to distribute it in multiple language markets, but at the time the dubbing and synchronization processes were very complex. It was preferred to shoot the dialogues directly in the different languages. 

To address this problem, the director decided to minimize the dialogue and used captions typical of silent cinema. This lack of dialogue makes the film even more evocative, pervaded by an unreal atmosphere. Also thanks to Rudolph Maté’s extraordinary photography that fills the images with disturbing shadows and mysterious glows.

One of the techniques most used by the director of photography was to use a gauze veil as a filter on the camera lens with which he obtained images surrounded by an almost imperceptible ethereal halo. While the cinematographic story proceeds, photographic experiments multiply. 

Really unforgettable sequences come to life, like the one of the terrible endings that we do not reveal here for those who have not yet seen the film. Despite the many films made on the figure of Dreyer’s vampire Vampyr, it still remains today one of the most extreme and original cinematic experiments. A work that differs considerably from the most common clichés of this creature typical of horror cinema.

It is a film that instead tries to show the hidden essence of the monster’s psyche and its power to transform reality into a world of dark shadows and deformations of reality, dragging the protagonists and the viewer into a nightmare with open eyes.

Mødrehjælpen (1942)

Mødrehjælpen (1942) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film follows the story of Erna, a young woman who discovers she is pregnant. Erna is unmarried and unemployed. She is initially undecided about what to do, but ultimately decides to keep the baby.

Erna turns to Mødrehjælpen for assistance. The organization provides Erna with financial support, housing, and medical care. Erna gives birth to a healthy baby and begins to rebuild her life.

Analysis:

Mødrehjælpen (1942) is an important film for its exploration of the themes of motherhood and poverty. The film is also a historical document that illustrates the work of Mødrehjælpen, which is an organization that is still active today.

Awards:

  • Mødrehjælpen (1942) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1942.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and lasts about 12 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Nordisk Film.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1942.

Dies Irae (1943)

Dies irae (1943) is a Danish drama film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film is based on the true story of Anne Pedersdotter, a woman accused of witchcraft and sentenced to death in 1623.

Plot:

The film is set in Denmark in the 17th century. Anne Pedersdotter is a young woman who marries an elderly Protestant pastor, Absalon. Anne is the daughter of a woman accused of witchcraft and sentenced to death.

Anne is a kind and compassionate woman, but she is also a strong and independent woman. She does not conform to the rigid rules of society at the time and is often criticized by her husband and the community.

Analysis:

Dies irae (1943) is a powerful and disturbing film that explores the themes of superstition, misogyny, and justice. The film was praised for its direction, cinematography, and performance.

Awards:

  • Dies irae (1943) won the award for Best Director at the Venice Film Festival in 1943.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 90 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Palladium Productions.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1943.

Two People (1945)

Two People (1945) is a Swedish drama film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film tells the story of two people, a man and a woman, who meet and fall in love, but who eventually separate due to their differences.

Plot:

The film is set in Sweden, in a small rural village. The protagonist is David, a young Protestant pastor. David is a kind and compassionate man, but he is also a repressed and insecure man.

One day, David meets Anna, a young woman who has just moved to the village. Anna is a strong and independent woman who does not conform to the rigid rules of society.

David and Anna fall in love, but their relationship is hindered by their difference in class and culture. David is conflicted between his feelings for Anna and his religious beliefs.

Analysis:

Two People (1945) is an intimate and heartbreaking film that explores the themes of love, loss, and faith. The film was praised for its direction, cinematography, and performance.

Awards:

  • Two People (1945) won the award for Best Swedish Film at the Göteborg Film Festival in 1945.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 75 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Svensk Filmindustri.
  • The film was released in Sweden in 1945.

Water in the Countryside (1946)

Water in the Countryside (1946) is a Danish drama film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film tells the story of a young woman who is trying to find her place in the world.

Plot:

The film is set in Denmark, in a small rural community. The protagonist is Anne, a young woman who has just lost her mother. Anne is a fragile and insecure woman who does not feel at home in the community.

Anne tries to find meaning in her life and a place where she feels at home. She falls in love with a young man, but their relationship is hindered by social differences.

In the end, Anne decides to leave the community and set out in search of a new beginning.

Analysis:

Water in the Countryside (1946) is an intimate and poetic film that explores the themes of loss, growth, and self-discovery. The film was praised for its direction, cinematography, and performance.

Awards:

  • Water in the Countryside (1946) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1946.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 85 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Palladium Productions.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1946.

Kampen mod kræften (1947)

Kampen mod kræften (1947) è un cortometraggio danese diretto da Carl Theodor Dreyer. Il film è un documentario che illustra il lavoro dell’organizzazione danese Kræftens Bekæmpelse, che fornisce

The Fight against Cancer (1947) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film follows the stories of three cancer patients, a man, a woman, and a child. The film illustrates their experiences with the disease, treatment, and rehabilitation.

Analysis:

The Fight against Cancer (1947) is an important film for its exploration of the themes of illness and suffering. The film is also a historical document that illustrates the evolution of cancer care in the 20th century.

Awards:

  • The Fight against Cancer (1947) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1947.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 15 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Palladium Productions.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1947.

Landsbykirken (1947)

Landsbykirken (1947) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film follows the evolution of Danish rural churches through the centuries.

Plot:

The film begins with a panoramic view of the first Danish rural churches, which were built of wood and simple. The film then follows the evolution of the churches over the centuries, with the introduction of more durable materials, such as stone and brick, and the addition of decorative elements, such as stained glass windows and frescoes.

Analysis:

Landsbykirken (1947) is an important film for its exploration of Danish history and culture. The film is also a historical document that illustrates the evolution of religious architecture in Denmark.

Awards:

  • Landsbykirken (1947) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1947.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 14 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Preben Frank Film for Dansk Kulturfilm.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1947.

They Reached the Ferry (1948)

They Reached the Ferry (1948) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film illustrates the importance of road safety.

Plot:

The film follows the story of a man and a woman who are driving on vacation. During the journey, the man makes a series of driving errors that put his and the woman’s safety at risk.

Analysis:

They Reached the Ferry (1948) is an important film for its promotion of road safety. The film is also a historical document that illustrates the road conditions in Denmark in the 1940s.

Awards:

  • They Reached the Ferry (1948) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1948.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 15 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Palladium Productions.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1948.

Thorvaldsen (1949)

Thorvaldsen (1949) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film illustrates the life and work of the Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen (1770-1844).

Plot:

The film begins with an overview of Thorvaldsen’s life, from his birth in Copenhagen in 1770 to his death in Rome in 1844. The film illustrates his artistic training, his international career, and his influence on sculpture.

Analysis:

Thorvaldsen (1949) is an important film for its promotion of Danish culture. The film is also a historical document that illustrates the life and work of one of the most important sculptors of the 19th century.

Awards:

  • Thorvaldsen (1949) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1949.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 10 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Preben Frank Film for Dansk Kulturfilm.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1949.

The Storstrom Bridge (1950)

The Storstrom Bridge (1950) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film illustrates the construction of the Storstrom Bridge, a suspension bridge that connects the islands of Sjælland and Falster in Denmark.

Plot:

The film begins with an overview of the bridge, from its design to its construction. The film illustrates the technical challenges and difficulties encountered during the construction of the bridge.

Analysis:

The Storstrom Bridge (1950) is an important film for its documentation of an important civil engineering project. The film is also an example of Dreyer’s ability to capture the beauty of nature in motion.

Awards:

  • The Storstrom Bridge (1950) won the award for Best Danish Film at the Venice Film Festival in 1950.

Other information:

  • The film was shot in black and white and runs for about 7 minutes.
  • The film was produced by Preben Frank Film for Dansk Kulturfilm.
  • The film was released in Denmark in 1950.

A Castle in a Castle (1954)

A Castle in a Castle (Et Slot i et Slot) (1954) is a Danish short documentary film directed by Carl Theodor Dreyer. The film illustrates the history and architecture of Kronborg Castle, located in Helsingør, Denmark.

Plot:

The film begins with an overview of the castle, from its construction in the 16th century to its history. The film illustrates the various parts of the castle, such as the Holger Danske Tower, the Throne Room, and the Court Theater.

Analysis:

A Castle in a Castle (1954) is an important film for its documentation of an important Danish historical monument. The film is also an example of Dreyer’s ability to capture the beauty of nature in motion.

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