Federico Fellini

Watch Selected Independent and Cult Films

Watch hundreds of rare independent and arthouse films, cult films and hand-picked documentaries from around the world with a single subscription, on any device. No limits, no ads.

Table of Contents

Federico Fellini was an Italian filmmaker, screenwriter, cartoonist, and writer, considered one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of cinema. He was born in Rimini on January 20, 1920, and died in Rome on October 31, 1993.

Fellini began his career as a journalist and cartoonist, but soon turned to cinema. His first film, Luci del varietà (1950), was co-directed with Alberto Lattuada. His third film, La strada (1954), won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and established him as one of the most important directors in the world.

Fellini’s films are characterized by a dreamlike and surreal atmosphere, reflecting his obsessions and his worldview. His characters are often eccentric and grotesque, but at the same time human and moving.

Fellini received numerous awards during his career, including four Academy Awards, three Golden Globes, and two Palme d’Ors at the Cannes Film Festival. He was also awarded the French Legion of Honor and the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic.

Fellini is considered one of the most important directors in Italian and world cinema. His films have influenced generations of filmmakers and continue to be enjoyed by audiences around the world.

Here are some additional details that I could add to the translation:

  • Fellini’s films often explore themes of childhood, dreams, and the human imagination.
  • He was a master of visual storytelling, and his films are often visually stunning.
  • He was a collaborator, and he worked with many of the same actors and crew members throughout his career.

Biography

Federico Fellini was born in Rimini, Italy, in 1920, to a middle-class family. He showed a great passion for drawing and writing from a young age.

At school, he began publishing his humorous drawings in local newspapers at the age of 16.

In 1939, he moved to Rome to study law, but soon turned to journalism and writing. He began collaborating with the satirical magazine Marc’Aurelio, where he published cartoons, columns, and stories.

In 1940, he also began working for the radio, where he wrote scripts for comedy and variety shows.

In 1943, he married actress Giulietta Masina, with whom he began to collaborate artistically.

In 1945, he began working as a screenwriter for cinema. He collaborated with some of the most important directors of Italian neorealism, including Roberto Rossellini, Pietro Germi, and Alberto Lattuada.

Fellini is considered one of the greatest directors in film history. His films, often inspired by his personal life and Italian popular culture, are characterized by visionary imagination and attention to detail.

Subscribe

Personal life

Federico-Fellini

Fellini was married to Giulietta Masina for 50 years, until her death in 1994. They had one child, Pier Federico, who was born dead in 1945.

Fellini died in Rome on October 31, 1993, at the age of 73. His death was a loss for the film world and left an unfillable void.

The White Sheik (1952)

The White Sheik is a 1952 Italian comedy film directed by Federico Fellini and starring Alberto Sordi, Brunella Bovo, and Leopoldo Trieste.

The film tells the story of a young provincial couple, Ivan and Wanda, who arrive in Rome on their honeymoon. While Ivan wants to focus on his family and the church, Wanda wants to meet her hero, a comic strip character named the White Sheik.

Wanda manages to meet the White Sheik, but soon realizes that he is not at all what she imagined. The White Sheik is actually an arrogant and superficial man, who has nothing to do with Wanda’s dream world.

Wanda’s disappointment is profound, but she eventually finds the strength to move on with her life.

The film is an allegory of the journey from adolescence to maturity. Wanda, like many adolescents, is searching for an ideal, something that will make her feel complete. The White Sheik represents the ideal of beauty and virility that Wanda has in mind. However, when Wanda meets the White Sheik, she realizes that the ideal is nothing more than an illusion.

The film is also a satire of Italian society of the time. The White Sheik is a character who embodies the values of bourgeois society: he is rich, handsome, and powerful. However, he is also a shallow and insignificant man.

I vitelloni (1953)

I vitelloni is a 1953 Italian film directed by Federico Fellini. The film tells the story of five young men in a small provincial town who live in a post-adolescent limbo, dreaming of escaping their monotonous lives.

The five friends are:

  • Moraldo (Franco Interlenghi): the most mature of the group, who begins to question the meaning of life.
  • Alberto (Alberto Sordi): a young, naive, and childish man who enjoys joking and provoking.
  • Fausto (Franco Fabrizi): a hardened womanizer who lives for the day.
  • Riccardo (Riccardo Fellini): a gambler who squanders his family’s money.
  • Leopoldo (Leopoldo Trieste): an inept intellectual who cannot find his way in life.

The five friends spend their days between the café, the billiard table, the walks, the useless loves, the vain projects. However, their lives are destined to change when one of them, Moraldo, decides to leave for Rome.

The film is an ironic and melancholic portrait of youth, exploring the themes of uncertainty, the passage into adulthood, and the search for one’s place in the world.

I vitelloni is an important film in Fellini’s career. It is his second film as a sole director and marks the beginning of his neorealist phase. The film was a critical and commercial success and helped to launch Fellini’s career as one of the most important Italian directors of the 20th century.

The Road (1954)

The Road is a 1954 Italian drama film directed by Federico Fellini. The film stars Giulietta Masina, Fellini’s wife, as Gelsomina, a young, naive, and innocent woman who is sold to Zampanò, a rough and violent street performer.

The film tells the story of Gelsomina, who seeks to find her way in life, but is thwarted by Zampanò’s brutality. Gelsomina is a kind and compassionate woman, who tries to see the good in people, even in Zampanò. However, Zampanò is a cruel and insensitive man, who is incapable of love.

The film is a story of love, loss, and redemption, exploring the themes of violence, compassion, and hope. The film was a critical and commercial success and won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1957.

cult-movie

Nights of Cabiria (1957)

Nights of Cabiria is a 1957 Italian drama film directed by Federico Fellini. The film stars Giulietta Masina, Fellini’s wife, as Cabiria, a Roman prostitute.

The film tells the story of Cabiria, a woman who searches for love and happiness in a cynical and indifferent world. Cabiria is a strong and resilient woman who never gives up on her dreams.

The film is an allegory of the human condition, exploring the themes of love, hope, and loss. The film was a critical and commercial success and won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1958.

The Swindle (1958)

The Swindle is a 1955 Italian drama film directed by Federico Fellini. The film stars Broderick Crawford, Richard Basehart, and Giulietta Masina.

The film tells the story of three con artists, Augusto, Picasso, and Roberto, who specialize in pulling “swindles” on gullible poor farmers, who they approach dressed as priests, asking for large sums of money to say masses in exchange for a fake treasure found on their land.

The film is a satire of Italian society in the post-war period, exploring the themes of deception, fraud, and hypocrisy.

The film was a critical and commercial success and won the Special Jury Prize at the 1955 Cannes Film Festival.

La dolce vita (1960)

La dolce vita is a 1960 Italian drama film directed and co-written by Federico Fellini. The film stars Marcello Mastroianni, Anita Ekberg, and Anouk Aimée.

The film tells the story of Marcello Rubini, a gossip journalist living in Rome in the 1960s. Marcello is a cynical and disillusioned man, who is searching for meaning in his life.

The film is a satire of Italian society at the time, exploring the themes of emptiness, superficiality, and the lack of values. The film was a critical and commercial success and won the Palme d’Or at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.

8½ (1963)

8½ is a 1963 Italian film written and directed by Federico Fellini. The film stars Marcello Mastroianni as Guido Anselmi, a film director suffering from creative block, and follows him as he navigates a labyrinth of memories, fantasies, and encounters with various characters both real and imagined.

8½ is widely considered to be one of Fellini’s greatest films and a masterpiece of Italian cinema. The film is known for its surreal imagery, dreamlike sequences, and exploration of the creative process. It has been praised for its originality, its exploration of human emotion, and its innovative use of film language.

Here are some of the key themes of 8½:

  • Creative block: The film is a meditation on the challenges of being an artist and the struggles of finding inspiration. Guido is haunted by the fear that he has lost his creative spark, and he is desperate to find a way to make his next film.
  • The nature of reality: The film blurs the lines between reality and fantasy, suggesting that our memories, dreams, and imaginations play a significant role in shaping our perception of the world. Guido’s mental state is in flux throughout the film, and he is constantly questioning what is real and what is not.
  • The search for meaning: The film is a philosophical exploration of the human condition. Guido is searching for meaning in his life, and he is haunted by a sense of existential angst. He is surrounded by superficiality and emptiness, and he yearns for something more profound.

8½ is a complex and challenging film. It is a film that invites the audience to participate in its exploration of the human psyche and the creative process. The film is full of memorable and iconic images, and it has been praised for its groundbreaking use of cinematic techniques.

Toby Dammit (1968)

Toby Dammit is an episode of the 1968 film Three Nights of a Dreamer, directed by Federico Fellini. The film is an anthology of three episodes, each directed by a different director: Fellini, Roger Vadim and Louis Malle.

Toby Dammit stars Terence Stamp as an alcoholic and decadent English actor who is cast to play the lead in a Catholic western. The actor is however obsessed by an unconscious call, which leads him to flee Rome and commit suicide in a car accident.

The film is a surreal and dark story that explores the themes of death, guilt and redemption.

Here are some of the key themes of Toby Dammit:

  • Death: The film is centered on death, which is represented as a constant and oppressive presence. The actor Toby Dammit is a man who lives with the awareness of his own mortality, and this awareness makes him restless and tormented.
  • Guilt: Toby Dammit is a man who feels guilty for his sins, and this guilt leads him to seek redemption. The car accident in which he dies can be seen as an act of suicide, an attempt to atone for his sins.
  • Redemption: The film suggests that redemption is possible, but that it is a difficult and painful process. Toby Dammit is a man who seeks redemption, but who cannot find it. His death can be seen as a failure, but also as a step towards redemption.

Fellini: A Director’s Notebook (1969)

Fellini: A Director’s Notebook is a television documentary directed by Federico Fellini in 1969. The film is an exploration of Fellini’s creative process, with scenes of him working on his film Satyricon and interviews with his collaborators.

The film is divided into two parts. The first part follows Fellini as he works on the sets of Satyricon. The second part consists of interviews with Fellini, Giulietta Masina, Marcello Mastroianni and other Fellini collaborators.

In the first part of the film, Fellini is seen working with his actors and crew to create the scenes of his film. The scenes are often surreal and dreamlike, and Fellini is seen using his imagination to create an imaginary world.

In the second part of the film, Fellini talks about his creative process and his films. He talks about his passion for cinema and his worldview.

Fellini: A Director’s Notebook is a fascinating and intimate film that offers a unique glimpse into the creative process of one of the greatest filmmakers in cinema.

Here are some of the key themes of the film:

  • The creative process: The film explores Fellini’s creative process, showing how he uses his imagination and experience to create his films.
  • The imagination: The film highlights the importance of imagination in the creative process. Fellini is a director who believes that imagination is the key to creating a new and imaginary world.
  • The worldview: The film offers a glimpse into Fellini’s worldview. His films are often characterized by a surreal and dreamlike atmosphere, which reflects his view of a complex and mysterious world.

Fellini Satyricon (1969)

Fellini Satyricon (1969) is a surreal and visually stunning film directed by Federico Fellini. The film is loosely based on the fragmentary novel of the same name by Petronius Arbiter, a Roman satirist who lived in the 1st century AD.

The film follows the adventures of Encolpius, a young man who is on a quest for his lost love, Giton. Encolpius’s journey takes him through the decadent and corrupt world of ancient Rome, where he encounters a variety of bizarre and often grotesque characters.

Fellini’s Satyricon is a highly stylized film that uses a variety of techniques, including dream sequences, flashbacks, and montages, to create a surreal and dreamlike atmosphere. The film is also visually stunning, with Fellini’s signature use of lavish sets, costumes, and lighting.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Decadence: The film portrays the decadence and corruption of ancient Rome, where people are obsessed with sex, violence, and power.
  • Liberation: Despite the chaos and despair that surrounds him, Encolpius retains a sense of hope and liberation. He is determined to find his love and live his life on his own terms.
  • The nature of reality: The film blurs the lines between reality and fantasy, suggesting that our perception of the world is shaped by our imagination and desires.

Juliet of the Spirits (1965)

Juliet of the Spirits (1965) is a surreal and visually stunning film directed by Federico Fellini. The film stars Giulietta Masina, Sandra Milo, Mario Pisu, Valentina Cortese and Valeska Gert.

The film follows the story of Juliet, a middle-aged woman who lives a seemingly perfect life. However, Juliet is dissatisfied with her marriage and her life in general. She begins to see ghosts and hallucinations, which lead her to explore her past and present.

The film is an exploration of the themes of femininity, memory and creativity. It is a surreal and visually stunning film, which has received critical and popular acclaim.

I clowns (1970)

I clowns (1970) is a docufiction film directed by Federico Fellini. It is a nostalgic and affectionate tribute to the world of clowns, and it explores the themes of beauty, innocence, and the passage of time.

The film is a personal and poetic work that is full of Fellini’s signature surreal imagery. It features interviews with clowns, archival footage of clowns from the past, and scenes of Fellini and his own troupe of clowns performing.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Beauty: The film celebrates the beauty of clowns, their costumes, and their performances. The clowns are often seen in a dreamlike and fairytale-like setting.
  • Innocence: The film portrays clowns as innocent and childlike figures. They are able to see the world in a way that is both playful and profound.
  • The passage of time: The film is a meditation on the passage of time, and it reflects on the way that clowns both embody and transcend the aging process.
Subscribe

Fellini’s Roma (1972)

Fellini’s Roma (1972) is an experimental and visually stunning film directed by Federico Fellini. It is a personal and nostalgic look at the director’s childhood and youth in Rome, and it is a celebration of the city itself.

The film is divided into a series of loosely connected episodes, each of which is a vignette of life in Rome. Some of the episodes are lighthearted and humorous, while others are more serious and even disturbing. However, all of the episodes are infused with Fellini’s unique vision of the world.

The film is also notable for its use of color and sound. The colors are often bright and saturated, and the soundscape is filled with the sounds of the city, from the honking of cars to the voices of people.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Nostalgia: The film is full of nostalgia for Fellini’s childhood and youth in Rome. He fondly remembers the sights, sounds, and smells of the city, and he uses the film to recreate his memories.
  • City life: The film is a celebration of city life, with all its chaos, energy, and vitality. Fellini captures the beauty and ugliness of Rome, and he shows how the city can both inspire and overwhelm its inhabitants.
  • Dreams and reality: The film blurs the lines between dreams and reality, suggesting that our perception of the world is shaped by our imagination and desires.

Amarcord (1973)

Amarcord (1973) is a semi-autobiographical film directed by Federico Fellini, set in the fictional village of Rimini in the early 1930s. The film follows the coming-of-age of Titta, a young boy growing up amidst the colorful characters and eccentricities of his small town.

Amarcord is a whimsical and nostalgic film that captures the essence of childhood and adolescence. The film is filled with humor, warmth, and a touch of melancholy, as it explores the joys, frustrations, and challenges of growing up in a small Italian town.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Coming-of-age: The film follows Titta as he navigates the challenges of adolescence, including first love, peer pressure, and the search for identity.
  • Nostalgia: The film is filled with nostalgia for Fellini’s childhood, and it evokes a sense of longing for a simpler time.
  • Community: The film celebrates the close-knit community of Rimini, and it shows how the town’s inhabitants support and care for each other.

Fellini’s Casanova (1976)

Fellini’s Casanova (1976) is a biographical film directed by Federico Fellini. The film stars Donald Sutherland as Giacomo Casanova, an eighteenth-century Venetian adventurer and writer.

The film follows Casanova’s life from his childhood in Venice to his death in prison in Vienna. Casanova is portrayed as a charming and charismatic man, but also as an immature and selfish womanizer. The film is a celebration of life and love, but it is also a reflection on the nature of seduction and illusion.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Desire: The film is an exploration of sexual desire, both male and female. Casanova is a man who is constantly seeking new pleasures, but his desire is often destructive.
  • Illusion: The film explores the power of illusion and seduction. Casanova is a master of deception, and he uses his ability to charm others to get what he wants.

Orchestra Rehearsal (1979)

Orchestra Rehearsal (1979) is a satirical film directed by Federico Fellini. The film follows the members of an Italian orchestra who go on strike against the conductor. The film was screened out of competition at the 32nd Cannes Film Festival.

The film is divided into two parts. In the first part, the members of the orchestra are interviewed by a television crew. They tell their stories and their reasons for going on strike. In the second part, the members of the orchestra reunite to rehearse a musical piece. However, the strike continues and the rehearsal is a disaster.

Orchestra Rehearsal is a complex and meaningful film. It can be interpreted as a satire of Italian society, but it can also be seen as a more general reflection on art, creativity, and collaboration.

City of Women (1980)

City of Women (1980) is a 1980 Italian fantasy comedy-drama film written and directed by Federico Fellini. It stars Marcello Mastroianni as Snaporaz, a middle-aged womanizer who finds himself in a world dominated by women.

The film begins with Snaporaz traveling on a train with his wife, Elena. On the train, he meets a mysterious woman in black and decides to follow her. The woman leads him to an unknown world, populated by women of all types.

Snaporaz meets strong and independent women, sensual and alluring women, strange and grotesque women. His journey is a dreamlike and surreal adventure, in which he must confront his fears and deepest desires.

The film also stars Anna Prucnal, Bernice Stegers, and Donatella Damiani. The music was composed by Nino Rota.

City of Women is a complex and fascinating film, which can be interpreted in many different ways. It is an allegory of the relationship between men and women, a journey into the human unconscious, a visionary work of art.

The film was met with mixed reactions from critics. Some critics praised it for its originality and poetic vision, while others criticized it for its misogyny and distorted view of women.

And the Ship Sails On (1983)

And the Ship Sails On (1983) is a musical-comedy-drama film directed and co-written by Federico Fellini. The film tells the events on board a transatlantic liner filled with friends of a deceased opera singer who have gathered to mourn her passing.

The film is set in 1914, on the eve of World War I. The ship, the Gloria N, is headed to the island of Erimo to scatter the ashes of the singer, Edmea Tetua. The passengers are a representation of Italian society at the time, with a variety of social classes, ages, and personalities.

The film is an exploration of the themes of death, loss and change. It is also a tribute to the world of opera and the beauty of music.

Ginger and Fred (1986)

Ginger and Fred (1986) is a drama-musical film directed and written by Federico Fellini. The film tells the story of two former variety dancers, Ginger and Fred, who reunite after years to perform on a television variety show.

The film is set in contemporary Rome and reflects on the human condition of aging and loss. Ginger and Fred are two iconic figures in the entertainment world, but they are now aging and their fame is past. Their attempt to relive the glory days of the past is doomed to failure, but the film offers a moving and poetic portrait of their friendship and their relationship with aging.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Aging: The film explores the theme of aging and the loss of youth. Ginger and Fred are two former variety dancers who are now aging and their career is over. Their attempt to relive the glory days of the past is doomed to failure, but the film offers a moving and poetic portrait of their friendship and their relationship with aging.
  • Regret: The film explores the theme of regret and nostalgia. Ginger and Fred regret the times past when they were young and famous. Their attempt to relive the past is an attempt to escape the reality of their current condition.
  • Friendship: The film celebrates the friendship between Ginger and Fred. Despite their failures and difficulties, the two remain loyal friends. Their friendship is a glimmer of hope in a world that seems to have forgotten them.

Interview (1987)

Interview (1987) is a biographical fantasy film directed by Federico Fellini. The film follows Fellini as he is interviewed by a Japanese television crew at Cinecittà, where he first arrived in 1940.

The film is an exploration of Fellini’s life and career, as well as a reflection on the nature of cinema. It is a film full of surreal and symbolic imagery, which has elicited different interpretations from critics and viewers.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Memory: The film explores the theme of memory and forgetting. Fellini reflects on his life and career, and the film is an exploration of his memories and fantasies.
  • Cinema: The film explores the theme of cinema and its magic. Fellini speaks of his love of cinema and his vision of the world, and the film is an exploration of the nature of cinema itself.
  • Creativity: The film explores the theme of creativity and inspiration. Fellini speaks of his creative process and his vision of art, and the film is an exploration of the nature of creativity. 

The Voice of the Moon (1990)

The Voice of the Moon (1990) is a fantasy comedy-drama film directed and written by Federico Fellini and starring Roberto Benigni, Paolo Villaggio, and Nadia Ottaviani. The film is set in the lowlands of Bologna and tells the story of Ivo Salvini, a melancholy and lovesick poet who follows voices from wells in search of the ideal woman who resembles his one true love, the moon.

The film is an exploration of the themes of love, madness, and fantasy. It is a film full of surreal and symbolic imagery, which are typical of Fellini’s work.

Some of the key themes of the film include:

  • Love: The film explores the theme of love in all its forms, from romantic love to platonic love. Ivo is in search of the ideal love, but his journey leads him to discover that love can be found even in the simplest things.
  • Madness: The film explores the theme of madness as a form of creativity and intuition. Ivo is considered a madman, but his journey is a journey of discovery and self-realization.
  • Fantasy: The film celebrates fantasy as a form of artistic expression. The film is full of surreal and symbolic imagery that evoke a fantastical and dreamlike world.

Unmade Films

Federico Fellini had numerous ideas for films that, unfortunately, never made it past the conceptual stage or, in some cases, existed solely in his vivid imagination.

One of the most notable examples is “Il viaggio di G. Mastorna,” a complete Fellinian screenplay collaborated on by Dino Buzzati. Filming commenced in 1966 in the countryside near Cinecittà, and some scenes were shot, but due to tumultuous circumstances, the film never reached completion. Vincenzo Mollica famously dubbed “Il viaggio di G. Mastorna” as the “most famous unrealized film in the world.”

In 1992, Fellini attempted to revisit the project, opting to film “Il Mastorna” with actor Paolo Villaggio. However, he abandoned the endeavor once again when the magician and psychic Gustavo Rol predicted his death if he proceeded with the film. Struck by this prediction, Fellini sought other avenues and enlisted the interest of the illustrator Milo Manara.

Manara translated Fellini’s storyboard into a comic, selecting Villaggio as the protagonist. The comic adaptation of Mastorna was planned as a three-part series, but due to a printing error, the word “Fine” (end) appeared in the first part. In superstition, the director decided not to continue.

“Viaggio a Tulum” is a subject/screenplay by Federico Fellini and Tullio Pinelli that never materialized as a film but took the form of a comic. In late 1985, Fellini embarked on a journey to Mexico to explore the locations described in the writings of writer-anthropologist-shaman Carlos Castaneda, accompanied by writer Andrea De Carlo.

De Carlo turned the experience into a short novel titled “Yucatan,” while Fellini intended to make a film that never came to fruition. The accounts of the two authors confirm a journey filled with omens and inexplicable events, oscillating between the grotesque and the supernatural.

The director unloaded these sensations in a screenplay co-written with Tullio Pinelli, titled “Viaggio a Tulun,” distorting the real name of the Mayan site, Tulum. The work was published in six installments in Corriere della Sera in May 1986.

In 1988, Fellini decided to create a film titled “Venezia,” focusing on the lagoon city, but for unknown reasons, the project never saw the light of day.

In 1989, while filming “La voce della luna,” Fellini revisited an idea from the 1960s to create a film about Pinocchio. He chose Roberto Benigni and Paolo Villaggio, already engaged on the set of the film he was directing, for the roles of Pinocchio and Geppetto, respectively, but the project was not realized due to his untimely death.

Books

Make a Film (1980)

Make a Film is a memoir by filmmaker Federico Fellini, published in 1980 by Einaudi. The book is a collection of writings, sketches, drawings, and memories that Fellini collected over the course of his film career.

The book is divided into three sections:

  • The first section is dedicated to Fellini’s formation as a director. Fellini tells of his childhood in Rimini, his passion for cinema, and his first steps in the world of cinema.
  • The second section is dedicated to the making of Fellini’s films. Fellini tells the creative process that led to the creation of his most famous films, such as La Strada, La Dolce Vita, 8½, and Amarcord.
  • The third section is dedicated to Fellini’s thoughts on cinema. Fellini reflects on the meaning of cinema, its art, and its social function.

The book is an important testament to the life and career of one of the greatest directors in film history. It is a fascinating and thought-provoking book that offers an incredible glimpse into Fellini’s world and his creative process.

Some thoughts on the book

Make a Film is a book full of food for thought. Fellini offers a unique view of cinema as art and as a medium of communication.

In the book, Fellini often speaks of the importance of imagination and creativity in cinema. He argues that cinema should be a means of exploring the inner world of man and giving shape to one’s dreams.

Fellini also speaks of the importance of collaboration in cinema. He argues that cinema is a collective art that requires the collaboration of a team of people with different skills.

Make a Film is an essential read for anyone who loves cinema and creativity.

Indiecinema

Indiecinema

Hundreds of Movies and Documentaries Selected Without Limits

New movies every week. Watch on any device, without any ads. Cancel at any time.