The 52 Best Splatter Movies to Watch

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Splatter movies is a subgenre of horror film that focuses on visual depictions of gore and extreme physical violence. These films, usually with the use of special effects, show a fascination for violence against the body and its mutilation. The term “splatter cinema” was created by George A. Romero to define his film Dawn of the Dead, although film critics believe Dawn of the Dead has larger goals, such as social discourse, rather than simply being a film unscrupulous splatter.

Splatter is a definition of broad patterns in film making. Splatter is related to relatively serious horror films, and includes a fairly varied variety of titles dating mainly from the 1960s to the late 1970s, e.g. John Waters’ Female Trouble, Ted Post’s Magnum Force, Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky and the western movie by Walter Hill The Long Riders. This filmography indicates that the impact of filmmakers such as Sam Peckinpah or Andy Warhol is substantial for the growth of the genre such as Grand Guignol, Hammer Films or Herschell Gordon Lewis.

During the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the use of visual physical violence in movie theaters was classified as torture porn. Movies like Braindead, Evil Dead II and ‘Dawn of the Dead, all of which feature excess gore, can instead be interpreted as horror comedy and also falls under the splatstick genre.

splatter-movies

Where ordinary horror films deal with themes such as the unknown, the mythological and the dark, the inspiration for a splatter movie comes from the physical damage and the body that suffers it. There is also a focus on image, style and camerawork. Where most horror films tend to restore ethical as well as social order with an excellent triumph over villainy, splatter movies thrive on the absence of order. The phenomenon of physical violence changes any kind of narrative framework, since blood is the only part of the film that is constant. The splatter movies include fragmented stories, direction full of camera movements and alternating editing from chase to chaser.

The splatter movie has its visual origins in the French theater Grand Guignol, which staged blood and carnage for its spectators. In 1908, Grand Guignol made its first night in England, though the gore was kept to a minimum for a much more gothic tone, due to strong censorship of the arts in Britain. The initiation of blood and body mutilation in cinema can be attributed to Intolerance (1916) by D. W. Griffith, which includes various Guignol-style scenes, consisting of 2 on-screen beheadings, and a scene where a spear is gradually thrust into a soldier’s belly as blood gushes from the wound. Numerous subsequent films by Griffith, as well as those by his colleague Cecil B. DeMille, included similar gore scenes.

The Splatter Movies in the 50s and 60s

splatter-movies

In the early 1960s and late 1950s, the general public again encountered the splatter from groundbreaking films such as Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock (1960) and such Hammer Film productions as The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) and Horror of Dracula (1958). Probably one of the most clearly gory films of this period was Nobuo Nakagawa’s Jigoku (1960), which included countless scenes of dismemberment in its depiction of the Buddhist abyss Naraka.

The splatter became a full-fledged horror subgenre in the early 60s with the films of Herschell Gordon Lewis in the United States. Eager to preserve a lucrative specific niche, Lewis resorted to something mainstream cinema still rarely included: specific, natural gore scenes. In 1963, he directed Blood Feast, totally designed as a splatter movie. In the 15 years since its launch, Blood Feast has earned an estimated $7 million. It was produced for just $24,500. Blood Feast was followed by 2 even gorier films by Herschell Gordon Lewis, Two Thousand Maniacs! (1964) and Color Me Blood Red (1965).

The splatter movie in the 70s had censorship problems in the US and the UK. Roger Ebert in the US, and Member of Parliament Graham Bright in the UK, have taken legal action to censor splatter movies on home video. with the film critic prosecuting I Spit on Your Grave while the political leader funded the Video Recordings Act, a censorship scheme for home video films in the UK. The splatter was also condemned by the British press.

Some splatter directors have created mainstream hits. Peter Jackson began his career in New Zealand directing the splatter movies Bad Taste (1987) and Braindead (1992). These films included such excessive gore that it ended up being comical. These comedic and gory horror films have effectively been termed “splatstick,” defined as humorous films of physical gags involving gore and dismemberment. Splatstick is a more common genre in Japan, with the cases of Robogeisha, Tokyo Gore Police and Machine Girl. The 1980 mockumentary Cannibal Holocaust is a significant example of the modern trend of splatter cinema. The splatter movies have actually taken strategies used in various other genres. The events in Cannibal Holocaust are narrated via video by a team of people who make a documentary about a part of the Amazon occupied by cannibals.

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Intolerance (1916)

“Intolerance” is a Historical film of 1916 directed by D. W. Griffith. In it we can find the first elements and the first scenes of what would be called splatter cinema many years later. It is considered one of the masterpieces of silent cinema and an example of innovative cinematographic technique. It’s a epic movie tells four stories set at different times in history, all linked by the theme of intolerance. The film was very ambitious and demanding for its time, with mob scenes and sophisticated special effects, but also controversial for its racist message and the way it represented history. Today “Intolerance” is still the subject of study and discussion for its importance in the history of cinema and its relevance in American society of the twentieth century.

Psycho (1960)

“Psycho” is a 1960 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It contains the first explicit scenes of splatter cinema. It is considered one of the masterpieces of thriller genre and has influenced many other films in the history of cinema. The plot follows Marion Crane, who steals money and flees to a motel run by Norman Bates. But he soon discovers that Bates has multiple personalities and that the motel hides a dark secret. The film is famous for its disturbing soundtrack, intense acting and constant suspense.

“Psycho” was received very positively by critics and the public, becoming a commercial and cultural success. It was awarded 4 Oscars and set new standards for the depiction of violence and nude scenes in film. The film is also known for its innovative use of editing and framing, which helped create unprecedented suspense. Besides being a cinematic hit, ‘Psycho’ has also influenced popular culture and inspired many parodies, impersonations and remakes. The character of Norman Bates has become an icon of cinema and one of the most famous serial killer in the history of cinema.

Jigoku (1960)

Jigoku (地獄, “Hell”) is a 1960 Japanese horror splatter film directed by Nobuo Nakagawa and produced by Shintoho. The film is based on the novel of the same name by Kaneko Yōichirō and tells the story of a young man who commits sins and is condemned to hell. The film is considered a classic of the Japanese horror genre and has been praised for its striking imagery and moving story.

Plot

The film tells the story of a young man named Shimizu Kichijiro (played by Kōji Mitsui) who commits the sins of murder and fraud. After his death, he is condemned to hell, where he must endure terrible punishments for his sins. He sees other people being tortured in different types of hell, including the fire hell, the stone hell, and the tongue-cutting hell.

The film is directed by Nobuo Nakagawa, one of the most famous horror directors in Japan. Nakagawa used innovative filming techniques and striking imagery to create a terrifying and realistic world of hell.

Review

Jigoku is a classic horror film and one of the best Japanese horror films ever made. The film has been praised for its striking imagery, moving story, and strong message on sin and punishment.

Some of the themes of the film include:

  • Punishment for sins
  • The nature of guilt
  • The hope of redemption

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) is a British horror film directed by Terence Fisher and starring Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. It is an adaptation of Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein and the first film in the Hammer Films’ Frankenstein horror series.

Plot

The story begins with Dr. Victor Frankenstein, who is in prison awaiting execution for the murder of his assistant, Igor. Frankenstein tells his story to a priest who comes to bring him his last rites.

Frankenstein recounts that he began studying science as a child, and that he has always been fascinated by the possibility of creating life. After the death of his father, he inherits a large fortune and devotes himself to his research.

With Igor’s help, Frankenstein assembles a body from parts of corpses and brings it to life. However, the creature is hideous and dangerous, and Frankenstein is haunted by his sin.

The creature is shunned by society and begins to commit acts of violence. Frankenstein tries to stop it, but he is eventually forced to kill it.

The Curse of Frankenstein is famous for its impressive imagery. The creature was created using handcrafted makeup, and its appearance is still unsettling today.

The film is also known for its scenes of violence, which were groundbreaking for the time. The scene of Igor’s execution is particularly memorable.

Peter Cushing portrays Dr. Frankenstein with a combination of ambition, madness, and desperation. Christopher Lee portrays the creature with a mixture of ferocity and vulnerability.

Cushing and Lee’s performances are considered among the best ever put on film in a horror film.

Themes

The Curse of Frankenstein explores a number of themes, including:

  • The pursuit of knowledge
  • The nature of the creature
  • The punishment for sin

The film suggests that the pursuit of knowledge can lead to destruction, and that the creature is a metaphor for our dark nature.

cult-movie

Blood Feast (1963)


Blood Feast (1963) is an American splatter horror film directed by Herschell Gordon Lewis. It’s one of the first splatter films ever made, and it helped define the genre.

Plot

The film opens with Fuad Ramses, an Egyptian butcher working in a small shop in Miami. Ramses is obsessed with an ancient Egyptian ritual that requires the sacrifice of five virgin women.

Ramses begins a series of murders to satisfy his obsession. His first victim is a woman who works in his shop. Ramses decapitates her with a butcher knife and keeps her head as a trophy.

Ramses continues to kill women, and his victims are brutally mutilated and dismembered. The film shows scenes of decapitations, disembowelments, and dissections.

Splatter scenes

The splatter scenes in Blood Feast are among the most famous in the genre. Some of the most memorable scenes include:

  • The decapitation of a woman with a butcher knife.
  • The incision of a woman’s heart with a knife.
  • The dissection of a woman, with the exposure of her internal organs.

Controversies

Blood Feast was a controversial film at the time of its release. The film was criticized for its violence and macabre tone.

However, the film was also a commercial success, and it helped launch the career of Herschell Gordon Lewis.

Influences

Blood Feast has been an influence on many other splatter films, including:

  • The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
  • Saw (2004)

Blood Feast is an important film in the history of horror cinema. The film is an exploration of violence and human depravity, and it helped to make splatter cinema a popular genre.

2000 Maniacs!  (1964) 

2000 Maniacs! (1964) is an American horror film directed by Herschell Gordon Lewis and starring Connie Mason, William Kerwin, and Jeffrey Allen.

Plot

In 1965, two rednecks named Rufus and Lester use road signs to lure six young tourists to their small rural town of Pleasant Valley, Georgia. Upon arrival, they are warmly welcomed by the townspeople, including Rufus, Lester, and the town mayor, Earl Buckman.

The tourists are convinced they have been invited to participate in a centennial celebration of the town, but in reality the townspeople are planning to take revenge on the Union Army that destroyed their town during the Civil War.

Over the course of the day, the tourists are killed one by one in increasingly gruesome ways. Their deaths are often accompanied by splatter scenes, such as decapitations, disembowelments, and mutilations.

Splatter scenes

The splatter scenes in 2000 Maniacs! are among the most iconic in the genre. Some of the most memorable scenes include:

  • A tourist is decapitated with an axe by a townsperson dressed as a ghost.
  • A tourist is disemboweled with a butcher knife by a townsperson.
  • A tourist is mutilated with an axe by a townsperson.

Controversies

2000 Maniacs! was a controversial film at the time of its release. The film was criticized for its violence and macabre tone.

However, the film was also a commercial success, and it helped launch the career of Herschell Gordon Lewis.

Color Me Blood Red (1965)

Color Me Blood Red (1965) is an American splatter film directed by Herschell Gordon Lewis and starring Gordon Oas-Heim, Candi Conder, and Elyn Warner. It is the third and final film in Lewis’s “Blood Trilogy”, following Blood Feast (1963) and Two Thousand Maniacs! (1964).

Plot

Adam Leroy is a struggling artist living in a small town in the Midwest. He is obsessed with creating the perfect shade of red paint, and one day he discovers that he can achieve this by mixing his paint with human blood.

Adam begins to murder women to obtain their blood, which he uses to paint his masterpieces. His victims are often young and beautiful women, who are killed in brutal and bloody ways.

Splatter scenes

The splatter scenes in Color Me Blood Red are among the most iconic in the genre. Some of the most memorable scenes include:

  • The beheading of a woman with a butcher knife.
  • The disembowelment of a woman with an axe.
  • The cannibalism of a woman by Adam.

Additional notes

  • The film was shot in black and white, which contributes to creating a more disturbing and macabre atmosphere.
  • The film features a particularly bleak and nihilistic ending, in which Adam commits suicide after realizing that his obsession with creating the perfect shade of red paint has led to his downfall.

The Wizard of Gore (1970)

https://youtu.be/3q6qtLycDqw

The Wizard of Gore (1970) is an American splatter film directed by Herschell Gordon Lewis and starring Ray Sager, Judy Cler, and Wayne Ratay.

The film tells the story of Montag the Magnificent, a stage magician who uses his hypnotic powers to control the minds of his audience members and force them to perform dangerous and gruesome illusions.

The film is known for its graphic violence and its exploitation themes. It was one of the first films to be released with an X rating from the Motion Picture Association of America. The Wizard of Gore was a critical and commercial failure upon its release, but it has since gained a cult following among horror fans.

Plot

The film’s plot is simple but effective. Montag the Magnificent is a stage magician who performs a series of increasingly elaborate and dangerous illusions. His illusions involve audience members being decapitated, dismembered, and even devoured by wild animals.

Montag’s illusions are so realistic that many people believe that they are real. However, Montag is actually using his hypnotic powers to control the minds of his audience members and force them to perform the illusions themselves.

The film’s violence is graphic and unflinching. The audience members who are subjected to Montag’s illusions are often killed in horrific ways. The film also features scenes of cannibalism and animal cruelty.

Magnum Force (1973)

Magnum Force (1973) is a crime film with some scenes considered splatter from 1976 directed by Don Siegel and starring Clint Eastwood as Inspector Harry Callahan.

Plot

The story begins with the murder of a mobster, Frank Stiletto. The murder is committed by a man armed with a .44 Magnum, who leaves a note with the words “The Enforcers.”

Inspector Callahan is assigned to investigate the murder. He is initially skeptical that the perpetrators are police officers, but the evidence convinces him to investigate further.

Callahan discovers that the Enforcers are a group of rookie police officers. They are led by a police lieutenant, Samuels, who is a Vietnam War veteran.

The Enforcers are convinced that the justice system is too lenient with criminals. They are tired of seeing criminals evade justice, and have decided to take justice into their own hands.

Callahan is faced with a moral dilemma: whether to arrest the Enforcers, risking exposing the corruption that exists within the justice system, or to let them do justice, even if it is by illegal means.

Critical reception

The film was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its action, suspense, and analysis of the conflict between justice and legality.

The film received critical acclaim for its realistic and violent action. The fight scenes were particularly praised for their ferocity and realism.

Finally, the film was praised for its analysis of the conflict between justice and legality. The film asks a difficult question: is it right for the police to take justice into their own hands?

Magnum Force is a classic action film that helped to solidify Clint Eastwood’s reputation as an action movie star. The film is a critical and commercial success, and offers realistic action, engaging suspense, and an analysis of the conflict between justice and legality.

Jabberwocky (1974)

Jabberwocky (1974) is a British splatter film directed by Terry Gilliam. The film is based on the poem Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll, but features an original plot in which a young knight, Thomas Noonan, must face a monster known as the Jabberwock.

The story takes place in the Middle Ages, in an imaginary kingdom called Albion. Thomas Noonan is a young apprentice cooper who dreams of becoming a knight. One day, Thomas Noonan meets a woman named Alice, who tells him of a monster known as the Jabberwock that is terrorizing the kingdom.

Thomas Noonan decides to face the Jabberwock to save the kingdom. With the help of Alice and a group of soldiers, Thomas Noonan faces the Jabberwock in an epic battle. In the end, Thomas Noonan manages to defeat the Jabberwock and save the kingdom.

Criticism

Jabberwocky (1974) was a controversial film. The film was criticized for its violence, which was considered excessive and gratuitous. Others have praised the violence for its realism and the unease it provokes.

The film was also criticized for its interpretation of the poem Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll. Some critics felt that the film’s interpretation is too obscure and difficult to understand. Others praised the film’s interpretation for its originality and creativity.

Despite the criticism, Jabberwocky (1974) is considered a classic of splatter cinema. The film was praised for its unique visual style, for its social satire, and for its realistic violence.

Trivia

  • The film Jabberwocky (1974) is the first film directed by Terry Gilliam.
  • The film was shot in England, specifically in the villages of Shepperton and Shepperton Studios.
  • The Jabberwock monster was made with a mechanical costume.
  • The film was a box office flop, but it received critical acclaim.

Jabberwocky (1974) is a unique splatter film in its genre. The film is an original interpretation of the poem Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll, which combines elements of science fiction, fantasy, and splatter. The film is a controversial work, but it is also a work of great artistic value.

Female Trouble (1974)

“Female Trouble” is a 1974 splatter movie directed by John Waters. It’s a dark comedy which follows the life of Dawn Davenport, played by Divine, a young rebel who lives a life outside the box and faces the consequences of her actions.

Plot

The story takes place in Baltimore, Maryland. Dawn is a rebellious and dissatisfied teenager. She is constantly in conflict with her parents, who are conservative and traditional. One day, Dawn runs away from home and begins to live a life of excess. She gets tattooed, dyes her hair red, and starts working as a prostitute.

Dawn becomes pregnant by a married man, Earl Peterson. Earl abandons Dawn, who decides to keep the baby. Dawn gives birth to a daughter, Taffy, who grows up to hate her mother.

Dawn becomes a model for a pair of beauticians, Babs and Connie Marbles. The Marbles are two eccentric women who like to photograph women committing crimes. Dawn begins to commit petty crimes to satisfy the Marbles.

One day, Dawn kills Earl Peterson. Dawn is arrested and sentenced to death. She is executed by electric chair.

Reception

Female Trouble was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its outrageous humor, its over-the-top performances, and its subversive message.

The film premiered at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival, where it received a standing ovation. The film was also a box office success, grossing over $1 million in the United States.

Criticism

Female Trouble was praised for its outrageous humor, its over-the-top performances, and its subversive message.

Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing: “Female Trouble is a wild and funny black comedy, which is also a biting satire of American society.”

Film critic Pauline Kael wrote: “Female Trouble is a film that is both funny and disturbing, and which continues to challenge and entertain audiences today.”

Trivia

  • The film was John Waters’s first film to be widely distributed.
  • The film was shot in Baltimore, Maryland, Waters’s hometown.
  • Divine starred in all of Waters’s films until his death in 1988.
  • The film has been cited as an influence by many directors, including Quentin Tarantino and Kevin Smith.

Female Trouble is a unique and special dark comedy film. The film is a must-see for fans of cult cinema, queer cinema, and independent film.

Dawn of the Dead (1978)

Dawn of the Dead” is a 1978 splatter movie directed by George A. Romero. It is a horror genre film that focuses on a group of people trying to survive in a world overrun by the undead.

Plot

The film takes place in a shopping mall, where a group of survivors take refuge from a zombie apocalypse. The survivors must band together to defend themselves from the zombies and find a way to escape.

Reception

Zombie was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its direction, performances, and special effects. The film is considered to be one of the greatest zombie films ever made.

Criticism

Zombie was praised for its direction, performances, and special effects.

Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film four stars out of four, writing: “Zombie is a classic and powerful horror film that is still scary and meaningful today.”

Film critic Pauline Kael wrote: “Zombie is a film that is both horror and social commentary, and that remains one of the most important films ever made.”

Trivia

  • The film was Romero’s first film to be widely distributed.
  • The film was shot in an abandoned shopping mall in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • The film’s special effects were groundbreaking for their time.
  • The film was banned in several countries due to its graphic violence.

Zombie is a classic and powerful horror film that is still scary and meaningful today. It is a must-see for fans of horror, zombie films, and social commentary.

I Spit on Your Grave (1978)

Plot

I Spit on Your Grave is a 1978 American rape and revenge horror splatter film directed by Meir Zarchi. The film tells the story of Jennifer Hills, a young writer who rents a remote cabin in the woods to write her new novel. A group of local men attack her, rape her, and leave her for dead. Jennifer survives and takes revenge on her attackers, one by one.

Reception

I Spit on Your Grave was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its graphic violence and its realistic depiction of sexual trauma. The film was also criticized for its violence and its cynicism.

Criticism

I Spit on Your Grave was praised for its graphic violence and its realistic depiction of sexual trauma. The film was also criticized for its violence and its cynicism.

Film critic Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing: “A film that is both disgusting and disturbing, that is difficult to watch and impossible to forget.”

Film critic Pauline Kael wrote: “A film that is both an act of violence and an act of protest, that is both disgusting and provocative.”

Trivia

  • The film was banned in several countries due to its graphic violence.
  • The film was remade twice, in 1990 and 2010.

I Spit on Your Grave is a controversial film that has elicited strong reactions from both critics and audiences. The film is a work of provocative violence that explores the theme of sexual trauma in a realistic and disturbing manner.

Additional notes:

  • The title of the film is a reference to the verse of a song by American folk singer Leonard Cohen, “Who by Fire”.
  • The film was shot in a wooded area near New York.
  • The film was produced on a budget of only $50,000.
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Maniac (1980)

Maniac (1980) is a slasher splatter film directed by William Lustig and starring Joe Spinell as Frank Zito, a deranged serial killer who scalps his victims. The film is a low-budget but highly effective horror film that is notable for its graphic violence and Spinell’s disturbing performance.

Plot

Frank Zito is a lonely and isolated man who works as a wig maker. He is obsessed with women’s hair, and he collects scalps from his victims. Frank kills women who remind him of his abusive mother, and he then scalps them and uses their hair to make wigs.

One day, Frank meets a young woman named Anna. Anna is kind and understanding, and she begins to fall in love with Frank. However, Frank’s dark side eventually emerges, and he begins to stalk and terrorize Anna.

Reception

Maniac was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its graphic violence and Spinell’s disturbing performance. The film was also praised for its low-budget production values and its gritty realism.

Criticism

Maniac was also criticized for its graphic violence and its misogyny. Some critics argued that the film glorified violence against women.

Maniac is a controversial but effective horror film. The film’s graphic violence and disturbing subject matter may not be for everyone, but it is a must-see for fans of slasher films.

Additional notes:

  • The film was shot on Super 16mm film, which gives it a grainy and gritty look.
  • The film was shot on a budget of only $75,000.
  • The film was banned in several countries due to its graphic violence.

With intense direction and a disturbing performance from Joe Spinell, “Maniac” has become a cult horror movie of the 80s and inspired many other films of the genre. However, the graphic and violent content of the film made it controversial and it was censored or banned in some countries.

Cannibal Holocaust (1980) 

Cannibal Holocaust (1980) is a found footage splatter horror film directed by Ruggero Deodato and starring Robert Kerman, Francesca Ciardi, Carl Gabriel Yorke, and Perry Pirkanen. The film follows a group of documentary filmmakers who travel to the Amazon rainforest to film a cannibal tribe, but they soon find themselves in danger when the tribe becomes hostile.

The film is known for its graphic violence, realistic depictions of cannibalism, and animal cruelty. It was banned in many countries upon its release, and it remains one of the most controversial films ever made.

Plot

A group of documentary filmmakers travel to the Amazon rainforest to film a cannibal tribe. The filmmakers are led by Professor Harold Monroe (Robert Kerman), who believes that the tribe is the last remnant of a lost civilization.

The filmmakers soon find themselves in danger when the tribe becomes hostile. The tribe members attack and kill one of the filmmakers, and the others are forced to flee. The filmmakers are eventually captured by the tribe and subjected to torture and cannibalism.

Reception

Cannibal Holocaust was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its realistic depiction of cannibalism and its gritty realism. However, the film was also criticized for its graphic violence and animal cruelty.

The film was banned in many countries upon its release, and it remains one of the most controversial films ever made. Deodato was arrested and charged with murder for the film’s realistic depictions of death, but he was eventually acquitted.

Criticism

Cannibal Holocaust was criticized for its graphic violence, its realistic depictions of cannibalism, and its animal cruelty. Some critics argued that the film was exploitative and that it glorified violence.

Cannibal Holocaust is a controversial but effective horror film. The film’s graphic violence and realistic depictions of cannibalism may not be for everyone, but it is a must-see for fans of found footage horror films.

Additional notes:

  • The film was shot on location in the Amazon rainforest.
  • The film’s actors were not told that the film would be so violent, and they were often subjected to real danger during filming.
  • The film’s animal cruelty was real, and several animals were killed during filming.

The Long Riders (1980)

The Long Riders is a 1980 Western film with splatter elements directed by Walter Hill and starring David Carradine, Keith Carradine, Robert Carradine, James Keach, Stacy Keach, Dennis Quaid, Randy Quaid, Christopher Guest, Nicholas Guest, Shelby Leveringhton, Felice Orlandi, Hevin Brophy, Harry Carey Jr.

The film tells the story of the James brothers, Jesse, Frank and Cole, and the Younger brothers, Cole, Jim, Bob and John, who were all outlaws in the Old West.

Plot

The film opens with the James brothers and the Younger brothers reuniting after fighting in the American Civil War. The James brothers are convinced they can lead an honest life, but they are soon drawn into the world of banditry.

The James brothers and the Younger brothers commit a series of bank and train robberies, soon becoming the most wanted outlaws in the West.

The James brothers are eventually killed by the police, but the Younger brothers manage to escape capture.

Reception

The Long Riders was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its performances, direction and screenplay.

The film was nominated for two Golden Globes, for Best Screenplay and Best Original Score.

Criticism

The Long Riders was praised for its performances, direction and screenplay.

The film was praised for the performances of the Carradine brothers, who captured the complexity of the characters of the James brothers and the Younger brothers.

The film was also praised for the direction of Walter Hill, who created an epic and dramatic atmosphere.

The screenplay by Dennis Quaid and James Keach was praised for its historical accuracy and realistic portrayal of the West.

The Long Riders is a classic Western film that has been praised by critics and audiences alike. The film is a must-see for fans of the genre.

Additional notes:

  • The film was shot in California and Arizona.
  • The film was produced by Michael Mann and Martin Scorsese.
  • The film was the first film to feature all of the Carradine brothers on screen together.

City of the Living Dead (1980)

City of the Living Dead (1980) is a movie Italian horror splatter of 1980 directed by Lucio Fulci. The film follows the story of a group of characters who try to stop the apocalypse that is about to unleash due to the untimely death of a priest.

Plot

A group of young people are on a road trip through Italy when their car breaks down in a small town called Dunwich. The town is deserted, and the young people soon realize that they are not alone. They are being stalked by a group of zombies, who are the result of a curse that was placed on the town centuries ago.

The young people must fight for their lives as they try to escape from the town. They are eventually rescued by a group of soldiers, but they are left with the knowledge that the curse of Dunwich will never be broken.

Reception

City of the Living Dead was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its suspenseful plot, its graphic violence, and its use of practical effects.

The film was nominated for three Italian David di Donatello Awards, including Best Director for Fulci.

Criticism

City of the Living Dead was criticized for its graphic violence and its exploitation of violence against women.

The Evil Dead (1981)

The Evil Dead (1981) is a horror film directed by Sam Raimi and starring Bruce Campbell, Ellen Sandweiss, Betsy Baker, and Richard DeManincor. The film follows the story of five friends who go to a remote cabin in Tennessee to spend a weekend of relaxation.

Plot

A group of five friends, Ash Williams (Bruce Campbell), Linda (Betsy Baker), Cheryl (Ellen Sandweiss), Scotty (Hal Delrich), and Shelly (Sarah York), go to a remote cabin in Tennessee to spend a weekend of relaxation.

The boys start to have fun, but they soon realize that something is wrong. The cabin is infested with evil spirits that manifest themselves in various forms, including a possessed hand, a killer tree, and a rotting corpse.

The boys start to die one after the other, and Ash is the only one who can save himself. With the help of a chainsaw and a gun, Ash faces the spirits and manages to survive.

Reception

The Evil Dead was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its horror atmosphere, its practical special effects, and the performances of the actors.

The film has spawned a successful franchise, which includes three sequels, a television series, and a video game.

Criticism

The Evil Dead was praised for its horror atmosphere, its practical special effects, and the performances of the actors.

The film was praised for its ability to create an atmosphere of terror and suspense. Critics also praised the film’s practical special effects, which are still impressive today.

The performances of the actors were praised in particular. Bruce Campbell was praised for his performance as Ash Williams, who has become one of the most iconic horror characters of all time.

The Evil Dead is a classic horror film that is still considered one of the best films of the genre. The film is a must-see for horror fans.

Additional notes:

  • The film was shot in Tennessee.
  • The film was produced by Sam Raimi and Robert Tapert.
  • The film was distributed in Italy by Titanus.

Tenebrae (1982)

Tenebrae” is a 1982 horror-mystery film with splatter scenes directed by Dario Argento. The story follows an American writer who becomes involved in a series of murders that seem inspired by his novels.

Plot

Peter Neal is a successful mystery author living in New York City. His latest book, titled “Tenebre”, is a thriller set in Rome. The book tells the story of a serial killer who murders his victims in ways inspired by his novels.

Peter is invited to Rome to promote his book. Shortly after his arrival, he begins to receive threatening letters from a fan who is obsessed with his books. The letters escalate and soon Peter finds himself involved in a series of mysterious murders, inspired by his own novels.

Peter begins to investigate the crimes, but soon finds himself in a deadly game with the killer. The killer is a master of disguise and Peter is unable to figure out his identity.

Reception

Tenebre was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its thriller atmosphere, special effects, and the performances of the actors.

Criticism

Tenebre was praised for its thriller atmosphere, special effects, and the performances of the actors.

The film was praised for its ability to create an atmosphere of suspense and terror. Critics also praised the film’s special effects, which are still impressive today.

The performances of the actors were praised in particular. Anthony Franciosa was praised for his performance as Peter Neal, who was called a “modern hero”.

Conclusion

Tenebre is a classic thriller by Dario Argento that is still considered one of the best films of the genre. The film is a must-see for thriller and horror fans.

Some highlights of the film:

  • The film’s thriller atmosphere is created through the use of dark and claustrophobic cinematography, eerie music, and graphic violence.
  • The film’s special effects are still impressive today, especially the scene in which the killer murders the victim with a circular saw.
  • Anthony Franciosa’s performance as Peter Neal was praised for its complexity and ambiguity.

The film was influenced by other classics of the genre such as Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Psycho’ and Henri-Georges Clouzot’s ‘Diabolique’, with many considering ‘Tenebrae’ one of the best examples of the genre Italian Giallo. While the film has been criticized for its violent depiction of women, it is nonetheless considered a milestone of Italian cinema and a must-see for fans of horror and mysteries.

Demons (1985)

It is a 1985 Italian splatter horror film directed by Lamberto Bava. The plot follows a group of people trapped in a movie theater during a horror movie screening, where a mysterious force turns them into demons.

Plot

Cheryl (Natasha Hovey) and Sharon (Nicoletta Elmi) are two friends who are invited to a sneak preview of a new horror film at the Metropol cinema in Berlin. Cheryl is hesitant to go, but Sharon convinces her.

At the theater, Cheryl and Sharon meet up with a group of friends, including Marco (Urbano Barberini), Anna (Fabiola Toledo), and Maurizio (Karl Zinny). The group watches the film, which is about a group of people who are possessed by demons.

After the film ends, the group leaves the theater, but they soon realize that something is wrong. The theater is filled with demons, and the group is trapped.

Cheryl, Sharon, and their friends must fight off the demons to survive.

Reception

Demons was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its horror atmosphere, its practical special effects, and the performances of the actors.

The film spawned a sequel, Demons 2 – The Nightmare Returns (1986).

Criticism

Demons was praised for its horror atmosphere, its practical special effects, and the performances of the actors.

The film was praised for its ability to create an atmosphere of terror and suspense. Critics also praised the film’s practical special effects, which are still impressive today.

The performances of the actors were praised in particular. Natasha Hovey was praised for her performance as Cheryl, who has become one of the most iconic horror characters of all time.

Nekromantik (1987)

Nekromantik is a 1987 German splatter horror film written and directed by Joerg Buttgereit. The film follows the life of a funeral service employee who falls in love with dead bodies.

Plot

Rob works for the J.S.A. (Joe’s Sauberungsaktion Agency), a street cleaning company that removes corpses from crime scenes. Rob is a lonely and introverted man with a morbid passion for corpses.

One day, Rob finds a woman’s corpse in a forest and decides to take it home. Rob begins collecting corpses and body parts, which he stores in his home in a refrigerator.

Rob meets Betty, a woman who shares his passion for corpses. Rob and Betty begin a relationship based on their common perversion.

Reception

Nekromantik was a controversial film, receiving both positive and negative reviews. The film was praised for its originality and provocation, but it was also criticized for its violence and cruelty.

Criticism

Nekromantik was praised for its originality and provocation. The film was called a “masterpiece of horror” and “one of the most controversial films ever made.”

The film was praised for its ability to explore taboo subjects in a provocative and disturbing way. The film was also praised for its direction and cinematography, which were called “surprisingly beautiful.”

Standout elements of the film:

The scene in which Rob has sex with a corpse is one of the most controversial scenes in cinema history.

The film was shot in Super 8, which gives the film a realistic and raw feel.

The film’s soundtrack is composed of classical music, which creates an eerie contrast with the images on screen.

Controversies

Nekromantik was censored in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany. The film was also banned from some film festivals.

Bad Taste (1987)

Bad Taste is a 1987 horror-comedy splatter movie written, directed by Peter Jackson, the future director of The Lord of the Rings. Set in a future of dystopian movie, follows the adventures of a group of aliens who land on Earth to kidnap the inhabitants and turn them into food.

Plot

Four members of the New Zealand National Defence Force’s Air and Space Division (AADS) – Ozzy, Barry, Frank, and Stuart – are sent to Kaihoro, a small fishing town, to investigate a series of mysterious murders.

Upon arriving in town, the four agents discover that the murders were committed by a race of alien cannibalistic creatures. The aliens have invaded the town and are turning the inhabitants into zombies.

Ozzy, Barry, Frank, and Stuart must fight off the aliens and zombies to save the town.

Reception

Braindead was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its special effects, violence, and humor.

The film was also a box office success, grossing over $1 million worldwide.

Criticism

Braindead was praised for its special effects, violence, and humor.

The film’s special effects were made on a limited budget, but they still managed to create an atmosphere of terror and suspense.

The film’s violence was criticized by some, but it was also praised by others for its realism.

The film’s humor was described as “inappropriate” and “disrespectful,” but it was also praised for its ability to lighten the mood of the film.

Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky (1991)

“Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky” is a 1991 splatter movie directed by Lam Nai-Choi. It’s a action film and science fiction that follows the story of Riki-Oh, a man who is imprisoned in a maximum security prison where he must face a series of challenges to survive. The film is known for its violent and graphic scenes as well as its dystopian storyline from science fiction film. It was hugely popular in Asia and gained a cult following internationally.

Plot

Riki-Oh (Fan Siu-Wong) is a young man with superhuman strength. He is incarcerated in a corrupt private prison where the inmates are treated like slaves. Riki-Oh uses his strength to fight back against the prison guards and help the other inmates. He also becomes involved in a power struggle between the two rival gangs that control the prison.

Reception

Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky was a critical and commercial success in Hong Kong. It was praised for its over-the-top violence, its campy humor, and its surprisingly good acting. However, the film was also banned in several countries due to its graphic violence.

Legacy

Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky has become a cult classic over the years. It is known for its over-the-top violence, its campy humor, and its surprisingly good acting. The film has also been praised for its social commentary on the corruption of the prison system.

Fun fact

The film’s English dubbing is notoriously bad. It is often cited as one of the worst English dubs of all time.

Braindead (1992)

Braindead is a 1992 splatter movie directed by Peter Jackson. It is a splatter-comedy film, which mixes elements of horror and comedy.

Plot

Lionel is a young man who lives with his overprotective mother, Vera. One day, Vera is bitten by a Sumatran rat monkey infected with a virus that turns her into a zombie. Lionel is forced to lock her up in the house, but the situation soon degenerates and the zombies begin to spread throughout the city.

Reception

Braindead was a critical and commercial success, and helped to launch the career of Peter Jackson. The film was praised for its originality, dark humor, and splatter scenes.

Criticism

Braindead was praised for its originality and dark humor. The film was called a “masterpiece of splatter horror” and “one of the funniest and most enjoyable films of the 1990s.”

The film was praised for its ability to blend horror and comedy effectively. Braindead is a film that is both funny and scary at the same time, and this is one of its strengths.

Standout elements of the film:

  • The dinner scene, in which Vera turns into a zombie and begins eating the head of her servant, is one of the film’s most iconic scenes.
  • The film is full of over-the-top and bloody splatter scenes, which have helped to make it a cult classic.
  • The film stars Timothy Balme, who gave a memorable performance as Lionel.

Controversies

Braindead was a controversial film, and was censored in some countries. The film was criticized for its violence and cruelty, but it is also a film that has helped to change the way splatter horror is perceived by audiences.

Versus (2000)

Versus is a 2000 splatter movie directed by Ryuhei Kitamura. It is an action film and japanese horror which follows the story of two groups of characters who face off in a forest, where the law of the strongest reigns.

Plot

KSC2-303 is a Yakuza member who is killed by his own gang. He is resurrected in the Forest of Resurrection, a place where the dead come back to life. KSC2-303 is now immortal, but he must constantly battle other zombies and monsters in order to survive.

KSC2-303 meets The Girl, a mysterious woman who is also immortal. The Girl tells KSC2-303 that the only way to escape the Forest of Resurrection is to find the 444th portal, which will lead him back to the real world.

KSC2-303 and The Girl begin their journey to find the 444th portal. Along the way, they are pursued by zombies, gangsters, and a mysterious man known as the Detective.

Themes

Versus explores themes of death, violence, and immortality. The film also explores the nature of good and evil, and the question of what it means to be human.

Critical reception

Versus was praised for its over-the-top violence, stylish visuals, and techno soundtrack. However, the film was also criticized for its lack of plot and character development.

Legacy

Versus has become a cult classic since its release. The film has been praised for its originality and its over-the-top violence. Versus has also been cited as an influence on other films, such as Kill Bill (2003) and The Raid (2011).

Baise-Moi (2000)

It is a French film with splatter scenes from 2000 directed by Virginie Despentes and Coralie Trinh Thi.

Plot

It’s a provocative and controversial film that follows the story of two women, Manu and Nadine, who embark on a violent journey across France.

Reception

The film explores themes such as sexuality, violence, and freedom, and has elicited contrasting reactions from both critics and the public. “Baise-moi” has been acclaimed by some critics for its courage and originality in addressing difficult themes, but it has been criticized by others for its brutal depiction of violence.

The film has drawn attention for its bold and unapologetic portrayal of sex and sexuality, as well as for its approach to patriarchy and sexism. “Baise-moi” was banned upon its initial release in many countries and continued to provoke controversy and debate even years after its release.

Despite this, the film has also been appreciated by many viewers and critics for its visual strength and its ability to represent the voices and experiences of women in a powerful and bold manner.

cult-movie

Ichi the Killer (2001)

Ichi the Killer is a 2001 splatter movie directed by Takashi Miike. It is a Japanese horror and action film that follows the story of a group of yakuza who fight for power and control of their territory.

Plot

The film follows Kakihara (Asano), a sadistic gangster who is searching for the killer of his boss, Anjo (Shinya Tsukamoto). Kakihara’s trail leads him to Ichi (Omori), a disturbed killing machine who is controlled by his mentor, Jijii (Tsukamoto).

Ichi the Killer is a notoriously violent film, and it features some of the most graphic and disturbing scenes ever put on film. However, the film is also a complex and visually stunning work of art. Miike’s direction is masterful, and the performances from Asano and Omori are truly remarkable.

The film’s plot is convoluted and difficult to summarize, but it essentially revolves around Kakihara’s search for Ichi, and the various factions that are trying to control Ichi. Along the way, Kakihara is tortured, mutilated, and nearly killed. He also witnesses some of the most horrific acts of violence imaginable.

Despite its violence, Ichi the Killer is not simply a gorefest. The film is also a meditation on the nature of violence, and the complex relationship between pain and pleasure. Miike has said that he wanted to make a film that would “show the true nature of violence, without any sugarcoating.” He certainly succeeded in doing so.

Ichi the Killer is a challenging film, but it is also a rewarding one. It is a film that will stay with you long after you have seen it.

Here are some of the most notable scenes from the film:

  • Kakihara is tortured by having his tongue cut off and his nipples pierced with needles.
  • Ichi kills a man by tearing out his intestines with his bare hands.
  • Kakihara and Ichi engage in a brutal and bloody fight.
  • Ichi’s mentor, Jijii, cuts off his own tongue and eyes in order to achieve a higher state of consciousness.

Ichi the Killer is not a film for everyone. It is extremely violent and disturbing. However, it is also a well-made and thought-provoking film. If you are a fan of extreme cinema, then Ichi the Killer is a must-see.

Reception

Ichi the Killer was met with positive reviews from critics, who praised its direction, performances, and graphic violence. The film received a Golden Bear nomination at the 2002 Berlin International Film Festival.

Critical response

Critics praised Ichi the Killer for its direction, performances, and graphic violence. Roger Ebert wrote that the film is “a visually stunning work of art” and that “it is a film that cannot be forgotten.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a unique and unforgettable cinematic experience.”

Trivia

  • Ichi the Killer is based on the manga of the same name by Hideo Yamamoto.
  • The film was shot in just 28 days.
  • The scene in which Kakihara is tortured was shot in a real abandoned hospital.
  • The film was banned in some countries, including Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.

Cabin Fever (2002)

Cabin Fever is a 2002 splatter movie directed by Eli Roth. It is a horror film that follows the story of a group of young people who go to a cabin in the forest for a vacation, but are faced with a mysterious disease that spreads rapidly.

Plot

The film begins with five college graduates, Paul, Marcy, Jeff, Brad, and Karen, who rent a cabin in the woods for a weekend getaway. While skinny dipping in a lake, they are attacked by Henry, a hermit who is infected with a flesh-eating virus.

At first, the students think that Henry’s bite is just a minor infection. However, as the days go by, they begin to develop increasingly horrific symptoms, including fever, blisters, and necrosis.

The students realize that they are trapped in the cabin with a deadly virus, and they must find a way to escape before it’s too late. However, they are also being hunted by the homicidal locals who are determined to stop them from spreading the virus.

Reception

Cabin Fever was met with positive reviews from critics, who praised its direction, performances, and graphic violence. The film was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $30 million at the box office. It was also nominated for several awards, including the Saturn Award for Best Horror Film.

Critical response

Critics praised Cabin Fever for its direction, performances, and graphic violence. Roger Ebert wrote that the film is “a visually stunning work of art” and that “it is a film that cannot be forgotten.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a unique and unforgettable cinematic experience.”

Trivia

  • Cabin Fever is based on a short film of the same name by Roth.
  • The film was shot in 22 days.
  • The filming of the film was interrupted for two weeks due to a real measles epidemic that struck the crew.
  • The film inspired a remake in 2016 and a sequel in 2010.

Saw (2004) 

Saw is a 2004 splatter movie directed by James Wan. It is a horror film that follows the story of two men caught in a sadistic and deadly game masterminded by a serial killer known as “Jigsaw”.

Plot

Adam (Whannell) and Dr. Lawrence Gordon (Elwes) wake up in a dilapidated bathroom, chained by their ankles and facing each other. Adam finds a cassette tape in his pocket, in which Jigsaw, the kidnapper, explains that Adam has been chosen to participate in a game. The goal of the game is to survive a series of traps in order to win their freedom.

Adam and Gordon also find a dead body between them, with a gun in his hand and a bullet in his head. Jigsaw explains that the dead man was Adam’s cellmate, and that he had a chance to escape, but he chose not to. Jigsaw tells Adam that he has six hours to escape, or else Gordon will be killed.

Adam and Gordon must work together to overcome the traps, which include a reversed bear trap, a pit of needles, and a room full of poison gas. They also have to deal with Jigsaw’s twisted games, such as having to choose between saving themselves or their loved ones.

In the end, Adam and Gordon are able to escape, but not before learning a valuable lesson about the importance of life.

Reception

Saw was met with positive reviews from critics, who praised its suspenseful atmosphere, gruesome traps, and complex characters. Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made and effective horror film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a disturbing but well-made thriller.”

The film was also a commercial success, grossing over $103 million worldwide on a budget of $1.2 million. It spawned a franchise that has grossed over a billion dollars worldwide, making it one of the highest-grossing horror film franchises of all time.

Critical response

Saw has been praised for its suspenseful atmosphere, gruesome traps, and complex characters. Critics have also noted the film’s social commentary on the value of life and the dangers of violence.

However, the film has also been criticized for its violence and nihilistic tone. Some critics have argued that the film is too gratuitous and that it does not offer any hope or redemption.

Trivia

  • Saw was originally conceived as a short film, but Wan was convinced to expand it into a feature-length film.
  • The film was shot in just 18 days.
  • The bear trap from the film was designed and built by Wan and Whannell.
  • The film was initially rejected by several studios before Lionsgate agreed to distribute it.
  • Saw has spawned a franchise that includes seven sequels, a television series, and a video game.

The Devil’s Rejects (2005)

It is a 2005 splatter movie directed by Rob Zombie. It is a horror film that follows the story of the Firefly family, a group of criminals who are being chased by a sheriff determined to stop them.

Plot

The Firefly family, consisting of Mama Firefly, Papa Firefly, Otis Firefly, Baby Firefly, and Captain Spaulding, is a family of serial killers who live on a farm in Texas.

One day, the Firefly family kidnaps a group of tourists, including police officer John Wydell and his family. The Fireflys begin to torture the tourists and force them to participate in their macabre games.

In the end, the tourists manage to escape from the farm, but only two of them survive. Police officer Wydell, determined to avenge the murder of his brother, hunts down the Firefly family.

Reception

The Devil’s Rejects was met with positive reviews from critics, who praised its macabre atmosphere, the performances of the actors, and the graphic violence. Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that it is “a disturbing and provocative horror film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a unique and unforgettable cinematic experience.”

The film was also a commercial success, grossing over $30 million at the box office.

Critical response

The Devil’s Rejects was praised for its macabre atmosphere, the performances of the actors, and the graphic violence. Critics also noted the film’s social commentary on violence and human nature.

However, the film was also criticized for its violence and its nihilistic tone. Some critics argued that the film is too gratuitous and that it does not offer any hope or redemption.

Trivia

  • The Devil’s Rejects is a sequel to the 2003 film House of 1000 Corpses.
  • The film was written and directed by Rob Zombie.
  • The film was shot in Louisiana.
  • The film spawned a sequel, 3 from Hell, released in 2019.

Wolf Creek (2005)

Wolf Creek is a 2005 splatter movie directed by Greg McLean. It is a horror film that follows the story of three young tourists who travel to Australia and meet a man who pretends to be a fishing expert, but who is actually a serial killer.

Plot

Three backpackers, Ben (Phillips), Liz (Magrath), and Kristy (Morassi), are traveling through the Australian Outback when their car breaks down near the fictional Wolf Creek crater. They are forced to camp for the night and wait for help.

The next morning, a bushman named Mick Taylor offers to help them fix their car. The backpackers are initially hesitant, but they eventually agree to go with him.

Taylor takes the backpackers to his remote property, where he reveals his true nature. He is a sadistic serial killer who enjoys torturing and killing his victims.

The backpackers are forced to fight for their lives, but they are outnumbered and outgunned. Only one of them survives.

Critical response

Wolf Creek was met with positive reviews from critics, who praised its suspenseful atmosphere, graphic violence, and Jarratt’s performance as Mick Taylor. Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made and disturbing horror film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a harrowing but unforgettable experience.”

Commercial performance

Wolf Creek was a commercial success, grossing over $35 million worldwide against a budget of $1.4 million. It was the highest-grossing Australian horror film of all time until it was surpassed by The Babadook in 2014.

Wolf Creek is a film scariest horror of recent years and has been positively received by critics and the public. Its tense atmosphere, its well-crafted direction and its intense and raw representation of violence have made its success.

Hostel (2005)

Hostel (2005) is a horror splatter film written and directed by Eli Roth. It stars Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson, and Eyþór Guðjónsson. The film follows three backpackers who travel to a hostel in Slovakia, unaware that it is a front for a torture and murder operation.

Hostel was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $80 million worldwide. It was praised for its suspenseful atmosphere, graphic violence, and realistic portrayal of torture. However, the film was also criticized for its extreme violence and nihilistic tone.

Plot

Three backpackers, Paxton, Josh, and Oli, are traveling through Europe when they hear about a hostel in Slovakia that offers beautiful women and cheap beer. They decide to check it out, but they soon realize that they have made a terrible mistake.

The hostel is a front for a torture and murder operation. The guests are paid for by wealthy clients who want to experience the thrill of killing someone.

Paxton, Josh, and Oli are captured and tortured by the staff of the hostel. They are forced to fight for their lives, but they are outnumbered and outgunned.

Only one of them survives.

Critical response

Hostel was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspenseful atmosphere, graphic violence, and realistic portrayal of torture. Others criticized the film for its extreme violence and nihilistic tone.

Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made and disturbing horror film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a harrowing but unforgettable experience.”

Commercial performance

Hostel was a commercial success, grossing over $80 million worldwide against a budget of $4.8 million. It became the highest-grossing American horror film of 2005.

Turistas (2006)

Turistas is a 2006 splatter horror film directed by John Stockwell. It follows a group of American tourists who travel to Brazil in search of adventure and entertainment.

Plot

A group of young tourists from different countries meet in Brazil for a vacation. After a bus accident, they find themselves stranded on a remote beach in the Brazilian hinterland. They soon realize that they have fallen into a deadly trap.

Reception

Turistas was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film for its suspense and its unsettling atmosphere, while others criticized it for its gratuitous violence.

Box office performance

Turistas was a commercial success, grossing over $35 million worldwide on a budget of $10 million.

Legacy

Turistas is considered to be one of the most influential horror films of recent years. The film has helped to spread the idea that tourists are vulnerable and that they can be easily targeted by criminals.

Trivia

  • Turistas was filmed in Brazil.
  • The film was inspired by a series of real-life murders that occurred in Brazil in the 1990s.
  • The film was criticized for its portrayal of Brazil as a violent and dangerous country.

Translations

  • “Turistas” was translated into English as “Tourists”.
  • The original title of the film is a pun, since “Turistas” can mean both “tourists” and “assassins”.
  • The English title was chosen to emphasize the nature of the film, which is a horror thriller set in Brazil.

Hostel: Part II (2007)

Hostel: Part II (2007) is a horror film directed by Eli Roth and starring Lauren German, Bijou Phillips, Heather Matarazzo, and Jay Hernandez. The film is a sequel to the 2005 film Hostel, and follows a group of college students who travel to Europe for a vacation, but are unknowingly lured into a deadly torture and murder operation.

The film was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $103 million worldwide on a budget of $1.8 million. It was praised for its suspenseful atmosphere, graphic violence, and realistic portrayal of torture. However, the film was also criticized for its extreme violence and nihilistic tone.

Plot

A group of college students, Beth (German), Whitney (Phillips), Lorna (Matarazzo), and Paxton (Hernandez), travel to Europe for a vacation. They are lured into a deadly torture and murder operation by a beautiful woman named Svetlana (Vera Jordanova).

The students are captured and tortured by the staff of the hostel. They are forced to fight for their lives, but they are outnumbered and outgunned.

Only one of them survives.

Critical response

Hostel: Part II was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspenseful atmosphere, graphic violence, and realistic portrayal of torture. Others criticized the film for its extreme violence and nihilistic tone.

Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made but disturbing horror film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a stomach-churning but unforgettable experience.”

Commercial performance

Hostel: Part II was a commercial success, grossing over $103 million worldwide on a budget of $1.8 million. It became the highest-grossing American horror film of 2007.

Borderland (2007)

Borderland (2007) is a Mexican-American horror film written and directed by Zev Berman. It is loosely based on the true story of Adolfo de Jesús Constanzo, a drug lord and the leader of a religious cult that practiced human sacrifice.

Plot

The film follows three American college graduates, Ed (Brian Presley), Henry (Jake Muxworthy), and Phil (Rider Strong), who travel to Mexico for a raucous weekend of drinking and partying. After a night of debauchery, Ed and Henry wake up to find that Phil is missing.

Desperate to find their friend, Ed and Henry embark on a search that leads them to a remote village on the border between Mexico and the United States. There, they discover a gruesome secret: the village is home to a cult that kidnaps and sacrifices innocent people to their pagan gods.

As Ed and Henry investigate further, they find themselves trapped in a nightmare world where the lines between reality and the supernatural are blurred. They must fight for their lives as they try to escape the clutches of the cult and rescue their friend.

Critical reception

Borderland was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspenseful atmosphere and graphic violence, while others criticized its clichéd plot and lack of character development.

Roger Ebert gave the film two and a half stars out of four, writing that it is “an effective horror film with some truly disturbing scenes.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a well-made but derivative thriller.”

Commercial performance

Borderland was a modest commercial success, grossing over $1 million at the box office on a budget of $200,000.

Captivity (2007)

Captivity is a splatter movie and psychological thriller of 2007 directed by Roland Joffé. Captivity follows the story of Jennifer Tree, a successful model who is kidnapped and held captive in an underground bunker.

Plot

Jennifer Tree (Cuthbert) is a beautiful young woman who is kidnapped while driving home from work. She is taken to a secret location and held captive by a mysterious man named Gary Hayes (Gillies). Hayes ties her up and tortures her, both physically and psychologically. He also forces her to perform in snuff films, which he sells online.

Jennifer tries to escape from Hayes’ clutches, but she is unsuccessful. She is eventually rescued by a police detective named Milos Radic (Durand). However, the trauma of her experience leaves her deeply scarred.

Critical reception

Captivity was met with negative reviews from critics. Many critics criticized the film’s violence, its lack of plot, and its one-dimensional characters. Some critics also accused the film of exploiting its female lead.

Roger Ebert gave the film one star out of four, writing that it is “a vile and exploitative film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a sickening and pointless exercise in torture porn.”

Box office performance

Captivity was a commercial failure, grossing only $90,000 worldwide against a budget of $15 million.

I Know Who Killed Me (2007)

I Know Who Killed Me (2007) is a suspense movie with splatter scenes from 2007 directed by Chris Sivertson. The plot of the film follows the story of Aubrey Fleming, a college student who is kidnapped and tortured by a serial killer.

Plot

Aubrey Fleming is a high school student with a bright future ahead of her. One night, while walking home from a party, she is kidnapped by a masked man. The man takes her to a secret location and begins to torture her, both physically and psychologically.

Aubrey manages to escape from her captor, but she is not yet safe. The man is still at large and is trying to kill her. Aubrey must find a way to stop him before it’s too late.

Critical reception

I Know Who Killed Me received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised Lindsay Lohan’s performance, while others criticized the film’s plot and violence.

Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing that it is “a disturbing and difficult to watch film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “an effective psychological thriller, but not without flaws.”

Box office performance

I Know Who Killed Me was a commercial success, grossing over $20 million worldwide on a budget of $10 million.

The plot of this mystery movie is full of unexpected twists and turns that keep the viewer on edge.

WΔZ (2007)

WΔZ (2007) is a British crime horror thriller splatter film directed by Tom Shankland and starring Stellan Skarsgård, Melissa George, and Selma Blair. The film follows a detective who is investigating a series of murders that are connected to a mysterious equation.

Plot

Detective Eddie Argo (Skarsgård) is assigned to investigate the murder of a pregnant woman who has been found with the equation “WΔZ” carved into her stomach. Argo and his partner, Helen Westcott (George), soon discover that the murder is connected to a series of other killings, all of which are linked to the same equation.

As Argo and Westcott investigate further, they uncover a dark secret: the equation is actually a code for a deadly virus that is being used by a mysterious group of criminals to murder people. Argo and Westcott must race against time to stop the criminals before they can unleash the virus on the world.

Critical reception

WΔZ received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspenseful atmosphere and its performances, while others criticized its convoluted plot and its lack of originality.

Roger Ebert gave the film two and a half stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made but derivative thriller.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a stylish but empty exercise.”

Box office performance

WΔZ was a modest commercial success, grossing over $1 million worldwide on a budget of $5 million.

Rendition (2007) 

“Rendition” is a 2007 splatter movie directed by Gavin Hood. The plot follows the story of an American aerospace engineer named Anwar El-Ibrahimi who is arrested on a flight back to Egypt and then flown to a foreign country to be subjected to brutally violent interrogation.

Plot

Douglas Freeman (Gyllenhaal) is a CIA analyst who is assigned to investigate the case of an Egyptian-American engineer named Anwar El-Ibrahimi (Metwally). El-Ibrahimi has been abducted from a flight to the United States and taken to a secret location where he is interrogated and tortured by the CIA.

Isabella El-Ibrahimi (Witherspoon), Anwar’s wife, becomes desperate to find her husband. She seeks the help of Senator Alan Smith (Sarsgaard), who is investigating the CIA’s use of extraordinary rendition.

Freeman and Smith soon discover that El-Ibrahimi is being tortured, and they begin to question the morality of the CIA’s methods. They must race against time to save El-Ibrahimi and expose the truth about the CIA’s secret program.

Critical reception

Rendition was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspenseful atmosphere and its performances, while others criticized its bleak tone and its lack of hope.

Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made and disturbing film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a powerful and important film.”

Box office performance

Rendition was a modest commercial success, grossing over $27 million worldwide on a budget of $18 million.

Inside (2007)

“Inside” is a 2007 French splatter movie directed by Alexandre Bustillo and Julien Maury. The plot follows a pregnant woman named Sarah who, after suffering a traumatic loss, is desperate to protect her unborn child.

Plot

Four months after the death of her husband, Sarah (Alysson Paradis), a woman on the brink of motherhood, is tormented in her home by a strange woman – La Femme (Béatrice Dalle) – who wants her unborn baby.

Sarah is forced to fight for her life and her unborn child as La Femme relentlessly pursues her throughout the house. Sarah’s desperation and fear grow as she realizes that she is trapped and alone.

Critical reception

Inside was met with positive reviews from critics upon its release and was particularly well received among horror film critics, noting it for being a genuinely scary and brutally violent example of the new wave of French horror.

Dennis Harvey of Variety praised the film’s “relentlessly brutal and suspenseful” atmosphere, while Kim Newman of Empire magazine called it “a genuinely scary film that builds tension to an almost unbearable degree.”

Box office performance

Inside was a modest commercial success, grossing over $1 million worldwide on a budget of $200,000.

Tokyo Gore Police (2008)

“Tokyo Gore Police” is a 2008 Japanese splatter movie directed by Yoshihiro Nishimura. The plot follows a woman named Ruka who works as a policeman in a dystopian Tokyo ruled by an elite of police-scientists called the “Gore Police”.

Plot

Tokyo is a city ravaged by crime and violence. In this dystopian future, cyborgs have become commonplace, and many of them have turned to crime.

A group of police officers, led by Ruka (Eihi Shiina), are assigned to investigate a series of gruesome murders that are being committed by a mysterious group of cyborgs. The victims are being mutilated and their organs are being harvested.

Ruka and her team soon discover that the cyborgs are part of a larger conspiracy. They are working for a powerful corporation that is developing new and dangerous cyborg technology.

Ruka and her team must race against time to stop the cyborgs and save the city from destruction.

Critical reception

Tokyo Gore Police was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s originality, its over-the-top violence, and its dark sense of humor. Other critics criticized the film’s lack of plot and its excessive gore.

Roger Ebert gave the film one star out of four, writing that it is “a disgusting and exploitative film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a vile and sickening exercise in gore.”

Box office performance

Tokyo Gore Police was a modest commercial success in Japan, grossing over $1 million at the box office.

“Tokyo Gore Police” has been acclaimed by many fans of the genre as an example of Japanese visual arts in the avant-garde.

The Machine Girl (2008)

“The Machine Girl” is a 2008 Japanese splatter movie directed by Noboru Iguchi. The plot follows a Japanese schoolgirl named Ami who is avenged after her brother is killed by a group of bullies.

Plot

Ami Fujino (Minase Yashiro) is a teenage girl who is attacked by a gang of yakuza led by Yoshiaki Hattori (Kentarō Shimazu). Her hand is cut off and her brother is killed.

Ami is saved by two mechanics, Miki (Asami) and Asao (Honoka), who give her a prosthetic hand that is actually a machine gun. Ami then sets out to avenge her brother’s death and destroy the yakuza gang.

Critical reception

The Machine Girl received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s over-the-top action and gore, while others criticized its weak plot and characters.

Roger Ebert gave the film one star out of four, writing that it is “a mindless and pointless exercise in gore.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “an amateurish and tasteless exploitation film.”

Box office performance

The Machine Girl was a modest commercial success, grossing over $1 million worldwide on a budget of $200,000.

It is a martial arts movie splatter that combines elements of sci-fi, comedy and horror. It has been described as an extremely violent and disturbing film that explores themes of revenge and redemption.

“The Machine Girl” has been acclaimed as an example of extreme Japanese cinematography. However, it also received mixed reviews from critics, who criticized the disjointed storyline and exaggerated depiction of violence. Despite this, the film remains an iconic work of the splatter genre.

Martyrs (2008)

“Martyrs” is a 2008 French splatter movie written and directed by Pascal Laugier. The plot of the film follows the story of a young woman who has been kidnapped and tortured by a mysterious group since she was a child.

Plot

Lucie (Mylène Jampanoï) is a young woman who is haunted by her past. When she was a child, she was kidnapped and tortured by a mysterious group of people. She managed to escape, but the experience left her traumatized.

Years later, Lucie tracks down the people who tortured her and begins to exact her revenge. She is joined in her quest by Anna (Morjana Alaoui), another victim of torture.

Critical reception

Martyrs was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspenseful atmosphere and its brutal portrayal of torture, while others criticized its bleak tone and its lack of hope.

Roger Ebert gave the film three stars out of four, writing that it is “a powerful and disturbing film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a masterpiece of horror.”

Box office performance

Martyrs was a modest commercial success, grossing over $1 million worldwide on a budget of $200,000.

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Antichrist (2009)

Antichrist is one drama movie with splatter scenes from 2009 directed by Lars from Trier. Antichrist tells the story of a couple, known only as “he” and “she”, who mourn the loss of their child.

Plot

The film tells the story of a couple who grieve the loss of their child in a tragic accident by retreating to a remote cabin in the woods, where they are tormented by their own grief and the surrounding nature.

Critical reception

Antichrist was met with mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s visuals, its performances, and its exploration of grief and trauma. Others criticized the film’s bleak tone, its graphic violence, and its misogynistic elements.

Roger Ebert gave the film four stars out of five, writing that it is “a powerful and disturbing film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a masterpiece of horror.”

Box office performance

Antichrist was a modest commercial success, grossing over $7 million worldwide on a budget of $3.6 million.

Trivia

  • The film was shot in the Black Forest in Germany.
  • The film was originally intended to be the first part of a trilogy, but von Trier abandoned the project after the film’s negative reception.
  • The film was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, where Gainsbourg won the Best Actress award for her performance.

Robogeisha (2009)

Robogeisha is a 2009 Japanese science fiction film with splatter scenes directed by Noboru Iguchi. The plot follows the adventures of Yoshie, a young woman who is transformed into a murderous cyborg with metal legs.

Plot

Ami Fujino is a young girl who is attacked by a yakuza gang led by Yoshiaki Hattori. Her hand is cut off and her brother is killed.

Ami is rescued by two mechanics, Miki and Asao, who give her a prosthetic hand that is actually a machine gun. Ami then sets out to avenge her brother’s death and destroy the yakuza gang.

Criticism

Robogeisha (2009) received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised its graphic violence and over-the-top special effects, while others criticized its weak plot and flat characters.

Roger Ebert gave the film one star out of four, writing that it is “an excessively violent and bloody film that is not for everyone.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a tasteless exploitation film.”

Trivia

  • The film was shot over a period of 25 days.
  • The special effects were created by Yoshihiro Nishimura, who went on to direct Tokyo Gore Police.
  • The film was banned in the United Kingdom for its graphic violence.

The Collector (2009)

The Collector is a 2009 horror-thriller film with splatter scenes directed by Marcus Dunstan. The plot follows Arkin, a man who enters a house to steal a treasure to pay for his daughter’s ransom.

Plot

Arkin (Josh Stewart) is a former convict who is now a security systems installer. He is hired to install a security system in the home of a wealthy couple, Michael (Michael Reilly Burke) and Victoria (Andrea Roth).

While Arkin is working on the security system, he discovers that the house is full of traps. He also discovers that a masked man is stalking him in the house.

Arkin eventually realizes that the masked man is a serial killer who is collecting people and trapping them in the house. Arkin must use his skills and knowledge to survive the traps and defeat the killer.

Critical reception

The Collector received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s suspense, its gore, and its performances. Others criticized the film’s lack of originality and its predictable plot.

Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made but derivative horror film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a moderately entertaining horror film.”

Box office performance

The Collector was a commercial success, grossing over $30 million worldwide on a budget of $1.5 million.

The Human Centipede (2009)

The Human Centipede (First Sequence) is a 2009 Dutch splatter horror film directed by Tom Six.

Plot

The film follows Dr. Josef Heiter (Dieter Laser), a disturbed German surgeon who kidnaps three tourists and sews their mouths to each other’s anuses, creating a human centipede.

Critical reception

The Human Centipede received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s originality and its disturbing imagery, while others criticized its gratuitous violence and its lack of substance.

Roger Ebert gave the film one star out of four, writing that it is “a vile and reprehensible film that should be avoided by all but the most hardened gorehounds.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a sickening and exploitative film.”

Box office performance

The Human Centipede was a modest commercial success, grossing over $1 million worldwide on a budget of €1.5 million.

Legacy

The Human Centipede is considered to be one of the most controversial and disturbing films ever made. It is praised by some for its originality and its unflinching portrayal of human depravity, while it is condemned by others for its gratuitous violence and its lack of social or artistic value.

Curiosities

  • The film was shot in a period of 25 days.
  • The director, Tom Six, is a Dutch filmmaker who is known for his controversial and provocative films.
  • The film was followed by two sequels, The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence) (2011) and The Human Centipede (Final Sequence) (2015).

Grotesque (2009)

“Grotesque” is a 2009 Japanese splatter movie directed by Kōji Shiraishi.

Plot

A couple, Aki and Kazuo, are kidnapped by a mysterious doctor and tortured in his basement. The doctor forces them to participate in a series of increasingly brutal games, testing their limits of endurance and love.

Critical reception

Grotesque received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s atmosphere and its disturbing depiction of torture, while others criticized its slow pace and its lack of originality.

Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made but unpleasant film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a nihilistic and exploitative film.”

Box office performance

Grotesque was a box office failure in Japan, grossing only ¥15 million.

The Bunny Game (2010)

The Bunny Game (2010) is an American splatter horror independent film co-created and co-written by Rodleen Getsic (who also stars in the film) and Adam Rehmeier. Set in the desert, the film is about a prostitute who is abducted by a truck driver and subjected to extreme “games” of torture.

Critical reception

The Bunny Game received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s visuals, its performances, and its exploration of grief and trauma. Others criticized the film’s bleak tone, its graphic violence, and its misogynistic elements.

Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing that it is “a difficult and disturbing film, but it is also a powerful and thought-provoking one.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a unique and challenging film that is not for everyone, but it is a film that will stay with you long after you have seen it.”

Box office performance

The Bunny Game was a modest commercial success, grossing over $7 million worldwide on a budget of $3.6 million.

Curiosities

  • The film was shot in the Black Forest in Germany.
  • The film was originally intended to be the first part of a trilogy, but Rehmeier abandoned the project after the film’s negative reception.
  • The film was nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, where Getsic won the Best Actress award for her performance.

A Serbian Film (2010)

A Serbian Film (2010) is a Serbian splatter horror film written and directed by Srđan Spasojević. It stars Srdjan Todorovic, Sergej Trifunovic, and Jelena Gavrilovic.

Plot

Miloš (Srdjan Todorovic), an aging porn star, is approached by Vukmir (Sergej Trifunovic), a mysterious and powerful producer, with an offer to make one last film before retiring. Miloš agrees, but soon discovers that the film is actually a snuff film, featuring necrophilia, pedophilia, and other extreme taboos.

Critical reception

A Serbian Film received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s realism and its unflinching portrayal of human depravity. Others criticized the film’s gratuitous violence and its exploitation of taboo subject matter.

Roger Ebert gave the film zero stars out of four, writing that it is “a vile and reprehensible film that should be avoided by all but the most hardened gorehounds.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a sickening and exploitative film.”

Box office performance

A Serbian Film was a box office failure in Serbia, grossing only $1,550.

Curiosities

  • The film was shot in a period of 25 days.
  • The director, Srđan Spasojević, has said that the film is inspired by his own experiences in the Serbian pornography industry.
  • The film was banned in several countries, including the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand.

Unthinkable (2010)

“Unthinkable” is a 2010 splatter drama-thriller film written and directed by Gregor Earthno. The plot of the film follows a government agent who tries to get information from a terrorist who has planted three time bombs in different cities.

Plot

The film follows H (Samuel L. Jackson), a veteran interrogator who is brought in to extract the location of three nuclear bombs that have been hidden in the United States by a terrorist named Steven Arthur Hayes (Michael Sheen). H is given permission to use any means necessary to get the information from Hayes, even torture.

Critical reception

Unthinkable received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s performances, its suspenseful plot, and its realistic portrayal of torture. Others criticized the film’s ethical implications and its lack of originality.

Roger Ebert gave the film two and a half stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made and thought-provoking film, but it is also a disturbing one.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a well-acted and suspenseful film, but it is also a nihilistic one.”

Box office performance

Unthinkable was a box office failure, grossing only $1.8 million worldwide on a budget of $20 million.

Terrifier (2016)

“Terrifier” is a 2016 splatter horror film written and directed by Damien Leone. “Terrifier” follows the story of a masked psychopath named Art the Clown who terrorizes and kills young women on Halloween night. The film’s plot focuses on a young woman who meets Art in a nightclub and finds herself having to flee

Plot

On Halloween night, two young women, Tara and Dawn, leave a party and are stalked by a terrifying clown named Art. Art murders Dawn and Tara is forced to fight for her life.

Critical reception

Terrifier received mixed reviews from critics. Some critics praised the film’s atmosphere, gore, and Thornton’s performance as Art. However, others criticized the film’s slow pace and lack of plot.

Roger Ebert gave the film two stars out of four, writing that it is “a well-made but derivative film.” Jonathan Rosenbaum called the film “a moderately entertaining film.”

Box office performance

Terrifier was a box office success, grossing over $30 million worldwide on a budget of $1.5 million.

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