80s Movies to Absolutely Watch

Watch Selected Independent and Cult Films

Watch hundreds of rare independent and arthouse films, cult films and hand-picked documentaries from around the world with a single subscription, on any device. No limits, no ads.

Table of Contents

The culture and films of the ’80s were characterized by an atmosphere of euphoria and optimism. The Cold War was ending, the economy was booming, and technology was advancing rapidly. This positive climate was reflected in popular culture.

The music of the ’80s saw an explosion of genres and styles. New wave, synth-pop, punk rock, and metal all enjoyed great popularity, along with a revival of disco music. Some of the most popular musical artists of the ’80s included Michael Jackson, Madonna, Prince, Duran Duran, U2, Whitney Houston, and Bon Jovi.

Cinema

The ’80s cinema was a period of great creativity and experimentation. Successful films included blockbusters like Star Wars, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, as well as high-quality art-house and independent films.

Television

Television in the ’80s witnessed the emergence of new formats and genres. Variety shows like Saturday Night Live and The Cosby Show were very popular, as were police dramas like Hill Street Blues and Miami Vice. Cartoons such as The Simpsons, The Smurfs, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles also enjoyed significant success.

Culture of the ’80s

80s-Movies

The culture of the ’80s was characterized by rampant consumerism. The new Western middle class, fueled by the economic prosperity of the decade, was eager to flaunt its social status through the acquisition of material goods. This consumerism was reflected in fashion, music, and television.

Hedonism

Hedonism was another significant element of ’80s culture. The decade was marked by an atmosphere of excess and permissiveness. This hedonism was reflected in music, cinema, and television.

Artistic and Cultural Decline

Some critics argued that the culture of the ’80s represented an artistic and cultural decline compared to previous decades. They claimed that ’80s culture was superficial, commercial, and devoid of meaning.

However, it is essential to remember that the ’80s culture was also a period of great creativity and experimentation. Among the films of the ’80s, there are iconic ones considered classics in the history of cinema.

One can also view the culture of the ’80s in a more positive light. It can be argued that this culture represented a moment of liberation and experimentation. The youth of the ’80s were free to express their individuality through fashion, music, and popular culture.

In this perspective, the culture of the ’80s was a time of positive change. It contributed to breaking with past conventions and paved the way for new forms of artistic and cultural expression.

Although the ’80s saw the rise of more commercial cinema, and films became even more of a mass industrial product, many directors in that decade created masterpieces, including maestros like Martin Scorsese, John Carpenter, Brian De Palma, David Cronenberg, and many others. Here is a list of some cult ’80s films that you probably already know and absolutely shouldn’t miss.

Subscribe

The Elephant Man (1980)

The Elephant Man is a 1980 British biographical drama film directed by David Lynch and starring Anthony Hopkins, John Hurt, Anne Bancroft, John Gielgud, Wendy Hiller, and Freddie Jones. The film tells the story of Joseph Merrick, a severely deformed man who is mistreated and ridiculed by society.

Plot

The film begins in late 19th-century London, where Joseph Merrick is living in a sideshow as a freak. He is mistreated and ridiculed by the people who come to see him, and he is constantly reminded of his deformities.

One day, a kind-hearted doctor named Frederick Treves takes pity on Merrick and rescues him from the sideshow. Treves takes Merrick to his hospital, where he is treated with kindness and respect. Merrick begins to learn to read and write, and he makes friends with the other patients at the hospital.

However, Merrick’s happiness is short-lived. He is soon discovered by the public, and he is once again subjected to ridicule and abuse. Merrick is eventually forced to flee from London, and he travels to Belgium, where he is eventually captured and returned to England.

Merrick is once again imprisoned in a sideshow, where he dies a few years later.

Themes

  • Appearance vs. reality: The film explores the theme of appearance vs. reality. Merrick is judged solely on his appearance, and he is never given a chance to prove his worth as a person.
  • Compassion and empathy: The film also explores the theme of compassion and empathy. Treves and the other patients at the hospital are the only people who treat Merrick with kindness and respect.
  • Social isolation: Merrick is a social outcast, and he is constantly reminded of his deformities. He is never able to fully integrate into society.

Reception

The Elephant Man was a critical and commercial success. It was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Actor in a Leading Role (Hurt), Art Direction-Set Decoration (Stuart Craig, Robert Cartwright, Hugh Scaife), Best Costume Design, Best Director, Best Film Editing, Music: Original Score, and Writing: Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium.

The film has been praised for its performances, direction, special effects, and score. It has been credited with raising awareness of people with disabilities.

Review

Not only among the best cult films of the 80s, but also among the best masterpieces of cinema. The David Lynch-directed film creates a remarkable synthesis in dealing with its subject, as well as having outstanding performances from John Hurt and Anthony Hopkins. Hurt is really great. It can’t be easy to act under such a heavy mask… the packaging is beautiful, especially the black and white photography of Freddie Francis.

Raging Bull (1980)

Raging Bull (1980) is a 1980 American biographical sports drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci, and Cathy Moriarty. The film is based on the 1970 memoir Raging Bull: My Story by Jake LaMotta, an Italian-American boxer who had a successful career in the 1940s and 1950s.

Plot

Jake LaMotta is an Italian-American boxer who lives in the Bronx, New York. Jake is a ferocious and aggressive boxer, who fights with an intensity that often leads him to exceed physical and mental limits. Jake is also a violent and impulsive man, who has problems with alcoholism and anger.

Jake begins his boxing career and quickly achieves success. He becomes middleweight champion of the world and is hailed as one of the greatest boxers of all time. However, his career is marked by controversy and personal problems. Jake becomes increasingly violent and aggressive, both in and out of the ring.

Reception

Raging Bull was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its direction, cinematography, editing, soundtrack, performances, and special effects. The film won two Academy Awards: Best Actor for Robert De Niro and Best Editing.

Review

Raging Bull is a film that has had a profound impact on popular culture. The film is a raw and realistic portrait of a man destroyed by his anger and his violence. Robert De Niro’s performance is considered one of the greatest in cinema history.

Bad Timing (1980)

Bad Timing (1980) is a British psychological drama film directed by Nicolas Roeg and starring Art Garfunkel, Theresa Russell, Harvey Keitel, and Denholm Elliott. The film is based on the 1979 novel “Bad Timing” by Yale Udoff.

Plot

The film is set in Vienna in 1980. Dr. Alex Linden (Art Garfunkel) is a young American psychiatrist who is living in Vienna and working at a local hospital. He is a quiet and introverted man who is struggling to come to terms with his own life.

One day, Alex meets Milena Flaherty (Theresa Russell), a beautiful and enigmatic woman who is married to a wealthy businessman. They begin a passionate affair, but their relationship is soon complicated by Milena’s mental instability and her manipulative behavior.

Themes

  • Obsession: The film explores the theme of obsession. Alex becomes obsessed with Milena, and he is willing to do anything to please her. However, his obsession eventually leads to his own downfall.
  • Deception: The film also explores the theme of deception. Milena is a master manipulator, and she is constantly lying to Alex and others. This deception leads to a great deal of mistrust and confusion.
  • Mental illness: The film also touches on the theme of mental illness. Milena is clearly suffering from some form of mental illness, and this instability makes her even more dangerous.

Reception

Bad Timing was a critical and commercial success. It was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the 1980 Sundance Film Festival.

The film has been praised for its performances, direction, cinematography, and score. It has been credited with being a groundbreaking film in the psychological drama genre.

Review

One of the least remembered and best known 80s cult films. Nicolas Roeg is a director of unique charisma, and has the ability to fascinate as well as capture attention. In other hands all this might be just deception and entertainment, but through these fragmented components Roeg and his author Yale Udoff develop a powerful story.

La terrazza (1980)

La terrazza (1980) is an Italian drama film directed by Ettore Scola and starring Marcello Mastroianni, Ugo Tognazzi, Vittorio Gassman, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Stefania Sandrelli, Carla Gravina, Ombretta Colli, and Milena Vukotic. The film follows a group of friends and colleagues who gather for dinner on a Roman terrace.

Plot

In Rome in 1980, a group of friends and colleagues gather for dinner on a terrace. The protagonists are Luigi (Marcello Mastroianni), a journalist in crisis; Mario (Ugo Tognazzi), a failed entrepreneur; Amedeo (Vittorio Gassman), a retired philosophy professor; Enrico (Jean-Louis Trintignant), a director in creative crisis; Giovanna (Stefania Sandrelli), a successful journalist; Carla (Carla Gravina), a writer seeking success; Tizzo (Stefano Satta Flores), a failed actor; and the hostess, Miranda (Ombretta Colli).

During dinner, the protagonists confront each other about their lives and careers. They discuss love, work, politics, and Italian society in general.

Themes

La terrazza explores themes such as identity crisis, failure, disillusionment, and loss of hope. The film is a melancholic portrait of the generation of the 1970s, which is faced with the disappointments of the present and the uncertainty of the future.

Analysis

La terrazza is a well-made and engaging film. It is a film that is both visually beautiful and emotionally significant.

The performances of the protagonists are exceptional. Marcello Mastroianni, Ugo Tognazzi, Vittorio Gassman, and Jean-Louis Trintignant give memorable performances of their characters.

The film is also notable for its direction, screenplay, and cinematography. Ettore Scola’s direction is sensitive and perceptive, capturing the essence of the generation of the 1970s. The screenplay, by Ettore Scola, Age, and Scarpelli, is well-written and engaging, with memorable dialogue and character development. Giuseppe Rotunno’s cinematography is beautiful and evocative, capturing the beauty of Rome in the 1980s.

Reception

La terrazza was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its performances, direction, screenplay, and cinematography. The film received numerous accolades, including the award for best screenplay at the Cannes Film Festival.

La terrazza has had a lasting impact on popular culture. The film has become a classic of Italian cinema and is often cited and analyzed.

The film is particularly notable for its depiction of Rome in the 1980s. The city is a vibrant and exciting place in the film, but it is also a place of danger and uncertainty. The film captures the essence of Rome in a way that is both realistic and memorable.

La terrazza is also a film about disillusionment and loss of hope. The protagonists of the film are all searching for something, but they are unable to find it. The film is a melancholic portrait of the human condition.

cult-movie

American Gigolo (1980)

American Gigolo is a 1980 neo-noir crime drama film written and directed by Paul Schrader and starring Richard Gere and Lauren Hutton. The film follows Julian Kay, a high-class male escort in Los Angeles who is framed for the murder of a client.

Plot

Julian Kay (Richard Gere) is a successful male escort who caters to the wealthy and powerful women of Los Angeles. He is known for his good looks, charm, and discretion. However, Julian’s life is turned upside down when he is framed for the murder of his ex-client, a prominent politician’s wife.

With no alibi and the police closing in on him, Julian goes on the run. He tries to clear his name, but he is constantly pursued by the police and the real killer. As he investigates the murder, Julian uncovers a web of corruption and deceit.

Themes

  • Identity: American Gigolo is a film about identity. Julian Kay is a man who is defined by his profession. He is a male escort, and his identity is based on his ability to please women. However, Julian is also a complex and intelligent man who is struggling to find his place in the world.
  • Duality: American Gigolo is a film about duality. Julian Kay is a man of two faces. He is a successful businessman, but he is also a male escort. He is a man of wealth and privilege, but he is also a man who is constantly on the run.
  • Alienation: American Gigolo is a film about alienation. Julian Kay is a man who is alienated from society. He is a solitary figure who lives on the fringes. He is a man who is searching for connection, but he is constantly pushed away.

Analysis

Richard Gere gives a captivating performance as Julian Kay. He is able to capture the character’s charm, intelligence, and vulnerability.

The film is also notable for its soundtrack, which was composed by Giorgio Moroder. The soundtrack is a mix of synth-pop and electronic music, and it perfectly captures the film’s atmosphere.

Reception

American Gigolo was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, performances, and soundtrack. The film was a box office hit, and it helped to make Richard Gere a star.

American Gigolo has had a lasting impact on popular culture. The film’s title has become a synonym for a male escort, and the film’s image has been referenced in many other films and television shows.

Shining (1980)

The Shining (1980) is a psychological horror film directed by Stanley Kubrick and based on the novel of the same name by Stephen King.

Plot

The story follows the events of Jack Torrance, a former teacher turned failed writer, who accepts a job as off-season caretaker of the Overlook Hotel, a luxurious mountain hotel that is isolated during the winter season. Jack, his wife Wendy, and their son Danny, who possesses paranormal powers, move into the Overlook, but Jack soon begins to lose his mind due to the isolation and the presence of evil presences that infest the hotel.

Reception

The film was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $44 million worldwide. It was praised for its direction, cinematography, editing, score, acting, and special effects.

Review

The Shining is a film that has had a profound impact on popular culture. Its disturbing, claustrophobic visual style has helped to define it as one of the most iconic horror films of all time. The story, which explores themes such as madness, isolation, and family, is still relevant and thought-provoking today.

An American Werewolf in London (1981)

An American Werewolf in London (1981) is a British horror film directed by John Landis and starring David Naughton, Jenny Agutter, Griffin Dunne, Brian Glover, and John Woodvine. The film is based on the 1969 novel “An American Werewolf in London” by John Landis and Gary Brandner.

Plot

The film begins in New York City, where David Kessler and Jack Goodman, two friends who are on a European backpacking trip, are attacked by a werewolf. David survives the attack, but Jack is killed.

David travels to London, where he begins to experience strange physical and behavioral changes. He realizes that he has been turned into a werewolf, and he begins to search for a way to stop the transformation.

David is helped by Jenny Agutter, a medical student who works at a psychiatric hospital. Jenny believes David, and she helps him search for a cure for his condition.

Themes

  • Identity: The film explores the theme of identity. David is forced to confront his new identity as a werewolf. This new identity is both frightening and fascinating, and David must find a way to live with it.
  • Love: The film also explores the theme of love. David and Jenny are attracted to each other, but their relationship is complicated by David’s transformation. In the end, David is willing to sacrifice his own life to save Jenny.
  • Fear: The film is a horror film, and fear is a central theme. The film creates a strong atmosphere of suspense and terror, and the audience is continually made to fear for David’s life.

Reception

An American Werewolf in London was a critical and commercial success. It was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Makeup and Best Original Score.

The film was praised for its direction, screenplay, special effects, and score. It was credited with helping to revive the horror genre in the 1980s.

Review

One of the great cult films of the 80s. Fun and terrifying at the same time, John Landis’ horror-comedy crosses categories while featuring Rick Baker’s stunning makeup effects. Romantic and twilight atmospheres, unforgettable scenes of the transformation into a wolf. A special mix of horror and parody films, comedy and existential drama.

1997 Escape from New York (1981)

Escape from New York (1981) is a dystopian science fiction film directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell, Lee Van Cleef, Donald Pleasence, Isaac Hayes, Ernest Borgnine, and Harry Dean Stanton.

Plot

In 1997, New York City has been transformed into a maximum-security prison, surrounded by an impenetrable wall. The President of the United States is kidnapped by criminals and taken to the island. The government tasks Snake Plissken, a former soldier turned criminal, with infiltrating New York and rescuing the President within 24 hours.

Themes

  • Dystopian society: The film explores the theme of dystopian society. New York is a place of violence, crime, and oppression. The government is corrupt and incompetent, and the citizens are enslaved.
  • The lone hero: The film presents Snake Plissken as a lone hero. He is a tough and violent man, but he is also a man of honor. He is willing to sacrifice everything to save the President, even though he does not know him.
  • Hope: The film is also a message of hope. Snake Plissken is a man who has lost everything, but he manages to find the strength to fight for justice.

Reception

Escape from New York was a critical and commercial success. It was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Makeup and Best Original Score.

The film was praised for its direction, screenplay, special effects, and score. It was credited with helping to revive the genre of dystopian science fiction.

Review

The most memorable of the dystopian cults of the 80s. John Carpenter offers viewers an unusual opportunity: to move away from the cold numbness of common fun and immerse themselves in fear. It’s worth a trip. Vincent Canby, in his review for the New York Times, composed. It’s a tough, over-the-top film, among the best escapist films of the period.

The Thing (1982)

The Thing (1982) is a science fiction horror film directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell, Keith David, Wilford Brimley, T.K. Carter, David Clennon, Richard Dysart, Charles Hallahan, Peter Maloney, Richard Masur, Donald Moffat, Joel Polis, and Thomas Waites.

Plot

In Antarctica, a group of American researchers are attacked by an alien creature. The creature is able to assume the form of any living being, and it begins to spread among the team members. The researchers must find a way to stop the creature before it’s too late.

Themes

  • The alien as a metaphor for the fear of the unknown: The alien creature represents the fear of the unknown. It is a creature that is not understood and cannot be controlled, and this generates fear and paranoia among the researchers.
  • Isolation: The story is set in an isolated base in Antarctica, and this isolation contributes to create an atmosphere of suspense and terror. The researchers are alone and vulnerable, and the alien creature can strike them at any moment.
  • Trust: The film also explores the theme of trust. The researchers must trust each other to survive, but the paranoia generated by the alien creature makes trust difficult.

Reception

The Thing was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, special effects, and score. It was credited with helping to revive the horror genre in the 1980s.

Review

The absolute horror cult of the 80s. Kurt Russell is the poster boy of 80s cinema for cult films. The Thing is one of John Carpenter’s most beloved films, but it didn’t start out that way. It was immediately criticized, but later ended up being representative of the 1980s after being released on home video and TV.

Blade Runner (1982)

Blade Runner is a 1982 neo-noir science fiction film directed by Ridley Scott and starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, and Edward James Olmos. It is loosely based on the 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick and tells the story of a blade runner named Rick Deckard who must hunt down and terminate four replicants who have escaped to Earth after a mutiny on a space mission.

The film is set in a dystopian Los Angeles in 2019, where replicants are bioengineered humanoid beings that are used as slaves. The film explores themes of artificial intelligence, identity, and what it means to be human.

Plot

In the year 2019, Los Angeles is a dark and dystopian city. Replicants, bioengineered humanoids created by the Tyrell Corporation, are used as slaves. Rick Deckard, a blade runner, is tasked with hunting down and “retiring” (killing) four replicants who have escaped to Earth after a mutiny on a space mission.

Deckard begins his search and soon finds Rachael, a replicant who has been created to seem human. Rachael is unaware of being a replicant, and Deckard is forced to decide whether or not to kill her.

Meanwhile, the replicants are making their way to the Tyrell Corporation, with the intention of killing their creator, Eldon Tyrell. Deckard catches up with them and has a confrontation with Roy Batty, the leader of the replicants.

Reception

Blade Runner was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its groundbreaking special effects, its dark and atmospheric visuals, and its complex and thought-provoking themes. The film has also been praised for its performances, with particular attention to Harrison Ford’s portrayal of Rick Deckard and Rutger Hauer’s portrayal of Roy Batty, the leader of the escaped replicants.

Review

Blade Runner is a complex and thought-provoking film that has been praised for its groundbreaking special effects, its dark and atmospheric visuals, and its complex and thought-provoking themes. It is considered to be one of the greatest science fiction films ever made and has been credited with helping to popularize the cyberpunk genre.

Curiosities

  • The film was shot in Los Angeles and Vancouver.
  • Roy Batty’s “Tears in rain” monologue is one of the most famous quotes from the film.
  • Blade Runner was a controversial film at the time of its release. Some critics felt it was too dark and violent.
  • The film was re-released in 1992 with new scenes and a new soundtrack.

Blade Runner is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is dark, atmospheric, and nuanced, with a story that explores complex and thought-provoking themes. The film is also well-made, with masterful performances and innovative special effects.

Rambo (1982)

Rambo (1982) is a 1982 American action film directed by Ted Kotcheff and co-written by and starring Sylvester Stallone as Vietnam War veteran John Rambo. It co-stars Richard Crenna as Rambo’s mentor Sam Trautman and Brian Dennehy as Sheriff Will Teasle.

Plot

John Rambo, a troubled and misunderstood Vietnam War veteran, is trying to find his place in society. He is haunted by the horrors of war and struggles to adjust to civilian life.

One day, while trying to find a meal in a small town, Rambo is harassed by the local sheriff and his deputies. He is eventually arrested and thrown in jail. When Rambo escapes from jail, he is pursued by the sheriff and his men.

Reception

Rambo was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its action sequences and its portrayal of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) faced by many Vietnam War veterans.

Review

Rambo is a classic action film that has thrilled audiences for generations. The film is well-made and suspenseful, with plenty of action sequences to keep viewers on the edge of their seats.

Sylvester Stallone gives a powerful performance as John Rambo, capturing the character’s inner turmoil and his struggle to find peace after the war.

Fanny and Alexander (1982)

Fanny and Alexander (Swedish: Fanny och Alexander) is a 1982 Swedish period drama film written and directed by Ingmar Bergman. The plot focuses on two siblings and their large family in Uppsala, Sweden during the first decade of the twentieth century.

Plot

The Ekdahl family consists of Oscar, a well-known and popular theater director, his wife Emilie, and their four children: Eva, Fanny, Alexander, and the baby Ismael. They lead a happy and comfortable life, filled with theatrical performances, music, and family gatherings.

However, their lives take a tragic turn when Oscar dies suddenly of a heart attack. Emilie, unable to cope with her grief and the financial burden of running the theater, turns to her cold and distant brother, Edvard Vergérus, for help. Vergérus forces Emilie to sell the theater and moves the family into his austere and oppressive home.

Reception

Fanny and Alexander was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its direction, cinematography, editing, score, acting, and special effects. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $44 million worldwide.

The film won four Academy Awards: Best Cinematography for Sven Nykvist, Best Costume Design for Gunilla Peterson, Best Art Direction for Anna Asp, and Best Foreign Language Film.

Review

Fanny and Alexander is a complex and deeply moving film that explores the themes of family, loss, and the resilience of the human spirit. It is a film that is both heartbreaking and heartwarming, and it is sure to stay with viewers long after they have seen it.

The film is beautifully shot, with stunning cinematography that captures the beauty of the Swedish countryside and the warmth of the Ekdahl family’s home. The performances are all excellent, particularly those of Pernilla August as Fanny and Bertil Guve as Alexander.

Scarface (1983)

Scarface (1983) is a crime drama film directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone, and starring Al Pacino, Steven Bauer, Michelle Pfeiffer, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, and F. Murray Abraham. The film is a remake of the 1932 film of the same name directed by Howard Hawks.

Plot

Tony Montana (Al Pacino) is a Cuban ex-con who arrives in Miami in 1980 as part of the Mariel boatlift. He quickly becomes involved in the drug trade and rises to the top of the Miami drug scene.

Montana’s success comes at a cost, however. He is constantly at war with rival drug lords, and his personal life is in shambles. He is addicted to cocaine and alcohol, and he is haunted by the ghosts of his past.

Despite his flaws, Montana is a charismatic and complex character. He is a man who is driven by ambition and a desire for power, but he is also a man who is deeply troubled and insecure.

Themes

  • The American Dream: The film explores the theme of the American Dream. Montana is a man who has come to America in search of a better life. He believes that he can achieve anything he sets his mind to, and he is willing to do whatever it takes to succeed.
  • The Rise and Fall of the Drug Lord: The film also explores the theme of the rise and fall of the drug lord. Montana is a man who quickly ascends to the top of the drug trade, but his success is ultimately his downfall. His addiction to drugs and his violent nature lead to his destruction.
  • The Immigrant Experience: The film also touches on the theme of the immigrant experience. Montana is a Cuban immigrant, and he struggles to fit into American society. He is constantly at odds with the authorities, and he is never fully accepted by the people around him.

Reception

Scarface was a critical and commercial success. It was nominated for three Academy Awards, for Best Original Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor (for F. Murray Abraham), and Best Film Editing.

The film was praised for its performances, direction, cinematography, and score. It was also a commercial success, grossing over $100 million at the box office.

Review

Brian De Palma’s Scarface premiered in New York and was one of Universal’s biggest hits in the 80s. The initial reaction was negative criticism due to the excessive physical violence, obscenity and drug use in the scenes. Some Cuban migrants in Miami took issue with the film’s portrayal of Cubans as lawbreakers and drug traffickers. In the years that followed, Scarface was reevaluated and is currently considered among the best gangster films ever made.

Subscribe

Videodrome (1983)

Videodrome (1983) is a Canadian science fiction body horror film written and directed by David Cronenberg and starring James Woods, Sonja Smits, and Debbie Harry. Set in Toronto during the early 1980s, it follows the CEO of a small UHF television station who stumbles upon a broadcast signal of snuff films.

Plot

Max Renn (James Woods) is the president of CIVIC-TV, a Toronto UHF television station specializing in sensationalist programming. He is desperate to find new ideas to attract more viewers, and he believes that he has found the answer in a mysterious broadcast signal called “Videodrome”. The signal shows a gruesome snuff film, and Max is immediately hooked. He becomes obsessed with the show, and he begins to lose touch with reality.

Themes

  • The nature of reality: Videodrome is a film that explores the nature of reality. Max is constantly questioning what is real and what is not, and he begins to believe that the Videodrome signal is more real than the world around him.
  • The media’s influence on society: The film also explores the media’s influence on society. Max believes that television is a powerful tool that can be used to control people, and he becomes obsessed with using Videodrome to control his viewers.
  • The body as a site of horror: Videodrome is also a film about the body as a site of horror. Max’s body begins to mutate and transform as he becomes more and more immersed in the Videodrome signal.

Reception

Videodrome was a critical success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, special effects, and performances. It was also a commercial success, grossing over $15 million at the box office.

The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Makeup and Best Original Score.

Review

80s horror cult film by David Cronenberg. Blondie singer Debbie Harry starred in this David Cronenberg film. Famous for body horror films, Cronenberg was successful in getting assistance from major Hollywood productions in the making of Videodrome. The film gained a huge following by pushing censorship restrictions to a new level. The director’s work is subversive and grotesque. The difficulties did not prevent Videodrome from ranking in the cult hall of fame.

The Key (1983)

The Key (1983) is an Italian drama film directed by Tinto Brass. The film is based on the novel of the same name by the Japanese writer Jun’ichirō Tanizaki.

The story is set in Venice, just before the outbreak of World War II. An elderly English professor, who is also the director of the Academy of Fine Arts, and his young wife, managing a pension in the heart of the city, are in search of their own identities within their sexual relationship.

Plot

In Venice, shortly before the outbreak of World War II, an elderly English professor, the director of the Art Biennale, and his young wife, who manages a pension in the heart of the city, are in search of their own identities within their sexual relationship.

Teresa, the wife, discovers and reads in her husband’s notebook all his morbid desires, which stimulates her to start her own diary confessing all her most forbidden and hidden thoughts, including the clandestine relationship with the young Hungarian, Laszlo, who is the boyfriend of their daughter Lisa.

The husband, Nino Rolfe, is a frustrated man dissatisfied with his sexual life. He is obsessed with sex and perversion, often having violent sexual fantasies.

“The Key” embodies many elements that defined the cinema of the ’80s. The film is sensual and intriguing, with a story that explores sexuality and passion. It is also well-crafted, featuring masterful performances and an iconic soundtrack.

Once Upon a Time in America (1984)

Once Upon a Time in America (1984) is an epic gangster film directed by Sergio Leone and starring Robert De Niro, James Woods, Elizabeth McGovern, Joe Pesci, Burt Young, and Danny Aiello. The film follows the lives of Noodles and Max, two childhood friends who grow up together in the Lower East Side of New York City during the first half of the 20th century.

Plot

The story begins in 1968, when Noodles (Robert De Niro), now a middle-aged man, receives a letter from Max (James Woods), an old childhood friend. The letter invites him to return to New York for a reunion. Noodles agrees to meet with Max, but when he arrives in New York, he discovers that Max is dead.

Noodles begins to reflect on his life and Max’s. The two friends met and grew up together in the Lower East Side of New York City during the first half of the 20th century. They shared everything, from poverty to friendship to crime.

Noodles and Max became successful gangsters. They built a criminal empire that stretched from New York to Los Angeles. However, their friendship was tested by power and violence.

Themes

Once Upon a Time in America explores themes such as friendship, loss, guilt, and regret. The film is a melancholic portrait of friendship and the loss of innocence.

The film is also an exploration of the nature of power and violence. Leone shows how power can corrupt and how violence can destroy.

Analysis

Once Upon a Time in America is a well-made and engaging film. It is a film that is both visually beautiful and emotionally significant.

The performances of the leads are exceptional. Robert De Niro and James Woods give memorable performances as Noodles and Max.

The film is also notable for its direction, screenplay, cinematography, and score. Sergio Leone’s direction is epic and engaging. The screenplay by Leone and Mario Puzo is well-written and engaging. The cinematography by Tonino Delli Colli is beautiful and evocative. The score by Ennio Morricone is iconic and memorable.

Reception

Once Upon a Time in America was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, performances, cinematography, and score. The film was a box office hit and helped to make Robert De Niro a star.

Once Upon a Time in America has had a lasting impact on popular culture. The film has become a classic of cinema and is often cited and analyzed.

Ghostbusters (1984)

Ghostbusters is a 1984 American supernatural comedy film directed by Ivan Reitman and written by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis. The film stars Bill Murray, Aykroyd, and Ramis as three eccentric parapsychologists who start a ghost-catching business in New York City.

Plot

Peter Venkman, Ray Stantz, and Egon Spengler are three parapsychology professors who are fired from Columbia University for their studies of paranormal phenomena. The three decide to start a ghost-catching business called “Ghostbusters.”

The Ghostbusters quickly become successful, helping to rid New York City of ghosts and spirits. However, they are soon drawn into a battle with a gigantic ghost named Gozer.

Reception

Ghostbusters was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $290 million at the box office, becoming the highest-grossing film of 1984.

The film was praised for its performances, direction, and special effects. It was also nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Sound Editing and Best Original Score.

Review

Ghostbusters is a funny and engaging film that has entertained generations of audiences. The film is full of hilarious gags, fantastical creatures, and adrenaline-pumping action sequences.

The film’s cast is excellent, with Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis, and Ernie Hudson giving memorable performances. Ivan Reitman’s direction is solid and his special effects are still impressive today.

Ghostbusters is a classic 1980s film that continues to be enjoyed by audiences of all ages.

Ghostbusters is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is:

  • Fun: Ghostbusters is a funny and engaging film that is sure to make audiences of all ages laugh.
  • Special effects: Ghostbusters introduced some of the most iconic special effects of the 1980s to the public, such as ghosts and proton streams.
  • Iconography: Ghostbusters created some of the most iconic characters and images in 1980s cinema, such as the Ghostbusters themselves and the film’s logo.

Gremlins (1984)

Gremlins is a 1984 American comedy horror film directed by Joe Dante and written by Chris Columbus. The film stars Zach Galligan, Phoebe Cates, and Howie Mandel.

Plot

Billy Peltzer receives a Mogwai named Gizmo as a Christmas gift from his father. Gizmo is a gentle and friendly creature, but there are three rules that must be followed for his safety: do not expose him to sunlight, do not get him wet, and do not feed him after midnight.

Billy and his sister Kate spend a fun day with Gizmo, but they soon break one of the rules. Gizmo is exposed to sunlight and multiplies, creating a series of evil Gremlins.

The Gremlins quickly spread throughout the town, causing chaos and destruction. Billy and Kate must find a way to stop them before it’s too late.

Reception

Gremlins was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $150 million at the box office, becoming one of the highest-grossing films of 1984.

Review

Gremlins is a funny and scary film that has entertained generations of audiences. The film is full of hilarious gags, scary creatures, and adrenaline-pumping action sequences.

The film’s cast is excellent, with Zach Galligan, Phoebe Cates, and Howie Mandel giving memorable performances. Joe Dante’s direction is solid and his special effects are still impressive today.

Gremlins is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is:

  • Entertainment: Gremlins is a funny and scary film that is sure to entertain and scare audiences of all ages.
  • Special effects: Gremlins introduced some of the most iconic special effects of the 1980s to the public, such as the Gremlins themselves and their transformations.
  • Iconography: Gremlins created some of the most iconic characters and images in 1980s cinema, such as the Gremlins themselves and the bathtub scene.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984)

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a 1984 American action-adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg and produced by George Lucas. It is the sequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and stars Harrison Ford as the archaeologist Indiana Jones.

Plot

In 1935, Indiana Jones is hired by the U.S. government to retrieve the Sankara Stones, three sacred statues that contain the power to control the forces of nature. The stones have been stolen by a Thuggee cult, a secret society of assassins who worship the Hindu god Kali.

Jones travels to India with the help of his former flame, Marion Ravenwood, and his trusty sidekick, Short Round. The three encounter a series of dangers, including deadly traps, monstrous creatures, and the Thuggee cult itself.

Reception

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $384 million at the box office, making it one of the highest-grossing films of 1984. It was praised for its action, humor, and special effects.

Review

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a fun and exciting adventure film that has entertained generations of audiences. The film is full of adrenaline-pumping action, slapstick humor, and fantastical creatures.

The film’s cast is excellent, with Harrison Ford giving an iconic performance as Indiana Jones. Karen Allen and Ke Huy Quan are also great in their roles as Marion Ravenwood and Short Round.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is:

  • Action: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is an action-packed film full of suspense, adrenaline, and fight scenes.
  • Humor: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a funny film that contains moments of slapstick humor and comedic situations.
  • Special effects: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is a film that made use of innovative special effects for the time.
  • Iconography: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom created some of the most iconic characters and images from 1980s cinema, such as Indiana Jones himself and the monstrous creatures from the temple.

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) is a 1984 American supernatural slasher film written and directed by Wes Craven. It was the first installment in the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise, and introduced the iconic villain Freddy Krueger, a disfigured serial killer who murders teenagers in their dreams.

Plot

In the quiet town of Elm Street, a group of teenagers are plagued by recurring nightmares of a disfigured man with a bladed glove named Freddy Krueger. As the dreams turn increasingly vivid and violent, the teens begin to die in the real world, seemingly from the injuries they sustained in their dreams.

Nancy Thompson, one of the survivors, realizes that Freddy is not just a figment of their imagination, but a real threat. With the help of her friends, she tries to uncover the truth about Freddy and find a way to stop him from haunting their dreams.

Reception

A Nightmare on Elm Street was a critical and commercial success. It premiered in the United States with a limited theatrical release on November 9, 1984, opening in 165 cinemas across the country. Grossing $1,271,000 during its opening weekend, the film was considered an instant commercial success.

The film was praised for its originality, its exploration of the horror of nightmares, and its iconic villain Freddy Krueger. It has been credited with revitalizing the slasher film genre and establishing Wes Craven as a master of horror.

Review

A Nightmare on Elm Street is a classic horror film that has terrified and entertained audiences for generations. The film is well-written and directed, with a suspenseful atmosphere and a memorable cast of characters.

Robert Englund’s performance as Freddy Krueger is iconic, creating a character that is both terrifying and pitiable. The film’s special effects are also impressive, especially for the time.

A Nightmare on Elm Street is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is:

  • Horror: A Nightmare on Elm Street is a horror film that explores the fear of the unknown and the darkness of the human psyche.
  • Slasher: A Nightmare on Elm Street is a slasher film that features a masked killer who stalks and murders teenagers.
  • Supernatural: A Nightmare on Elm Street is a supernatural film that features a killer who can enter and manipulate people’s dreams.
  • Iconography: A Nightmare on Elm Street created one of the most iconic villains in horror cinema, Freddy Krueger.

There’s Nothing Left to Do but Cry (1984) 

There’s Nothing Left to Do but Cry is a 1984 Italian comedy film written, directed, and starring Roberto Benigni and Massimo Troisi. The film is set in Tuscany and tells the story of two friends, Saverio and Mario, who find themselves transported back in time to 1492, the year of Christopher Columbus’s discovery of America.

Plot

Saverio and Mario are two friends, a primary school teacher and a janitor, who live in a small Tuscan town. One day, while they are waiting to cross a level crossing, they are hit by a car carrying a beam of magnetic energy. The accident catapults them back in time, to 1492.

The two friends find themselves thus catapulted into a completely different world, full of dangers and pitfalls. They are forced to learn to survive in an era in which they know no one and have no resources.

The friendship between Saverio and Mario is put to the test by the difficulties they face, but in the end they manage to overcome all challenges and return to their own time.

Reception

There’s Nothing Left to Do but Cry was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its comedy, adventure, and acting.

Review

There’s Nothing Left to Do but Cry is a comedy film that has made audiences of all ages laugh and cry. The film is well-written and directed, with a script full of gags and funny moments.

Roberto Benigni and Massimo Troisi are extraordinary in the roles of the two protagonists, Saverio and Mario. The two actors manage to create an irresistible comic alchemy.

The Country Boy (1984)

The Country Boy (1984) is an Italian comedy film directed by Franco Castellano and Giuseppe Moccia and starring Renato Pozzetto. The film is set in Lombardy and tells the story of Artemio, a farmer who lives in a small rural village.

Plot

Artemio is a farmer who lives in a small rural village in Lombardy. Tired of the rural life, which he sees as too backward and difficult, he decides to try to move to the city, to the metropolis of Milan.

One day, on the occasion of his fortieth birthday, Artemio realizes that he wants a normal life away from the harshness of the countryside. The man thus decides to try his luck in Milan.

Artemio thus finds himself catapulted into a completely different city, full of stimuli and opportunities. But his naivety and inexperience lead him to commit a series of gaffes and troubles.

Reception

The Country Boy was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its humor, its simplicity, and its authenticity.

Review

The Country Boy is a comedy film that has made audiences of all ages laugh and cry. The film is well-written and directed, with a script full of gags and funny moments.

Renato Pozzetto is extraordinary in the role of the protagonist, Artemio. The actor manages to create a character who is both comic and moving.

The NeverEnding Story (1984)

The NeverEnding Story (1984) is a 1984 German fantasy film directed by Wolfgang Petersen and starring Noah Hathaway, Barret Oliver, and Tami Stronach. The film is based on the novel of the same name by Michael Ende, published in 1979. The story follows the adventures of Bastian Balthazar Bux, a 10-year-old boy who, after stealing a book called “The NeverEnding Story”, is transported to the fantasy world of Fantasia, where he must save the Childlike Empress from a deadly threat.

Plot

Bastian Balthazar Bux is a 10-year-old boy who lives in Berlin, Germany, during World War II. Bastian is a lonely and unhappy boy who is bullied by his classmates. One day, Bastian runs away from school and takes refuge in a library, where he finds a book called “The NeverEnding Story”. The book tells the story of Fantasia, a fantasy world inhabited by magical creatures.

Bastian becomes engrossed in the story and begins to read it eagerly. As he reads, Bastian is transported to the world of Fantasia, where he finds himself to be the hero of the story. Bastian must save the Childlike Empress, the ruler of Fantasia, from the Nothing, a dark force that is destroying the world.

Reception

The NeverEnding Story was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its spectacular visuals, its engaging story, and its performances. The film was also a box office hit, grossing over $100 million worldwide.

Review

The NeverEnding Story is a classic fantasy film that has captivated generations of viewers. The film is a thrilling and moving story that explores important themes such as imagination, courage, and the power of imagination.

Noah Hathaway is outstanding in the role of Bastian, capturing his innocence, courage, and personal growth. Barret Oliver is equally good in the role of Atreyu, Bastian’s loyal friend.

Terminator (1984)

The Terminator is a 1984 science fiction action film directed by James Cameron and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, and Michael Biehn.

Plot

The film tells the story of Sarah Connor, a young woman who is destined to give birth to the future savior of humanity. In 1984, a cyborg assassin known as the Terminator is sent back in time from the year 2029 to kill Sarah before she can give birth. However, a soldier from the future, Kyle Reese, is also sent back in time to protect Sarah.

Reception

The Terminator was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its action sequences, its special effects, and its performances. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $78 million worldwide.

Impact

The Terminator is considered to be one of the most influential science fiction films of all time and has had a lasting impact on popular culture. The film’s iconic imagery, including the Terminator’s endoskeleton and the phrase “I’ll be back,” has been referenced and parodied countless times. The film has also inspired several sequels and a television series.

Awards and Nominations

The Terminator won two Academy Awards: Best Sound Editing and Best Sound Mixing. It was also nominated for Best Original Screenplay and Best Makeup.

Trivia

  • The film was shot in Los Angeles and Mexico City.
  • The original title of the film was “Cyberdyne Systems.”
  • The film was produced by the Orion Pictures company.

After Hours (1985)

After Hours (1985) is a comedy-drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Griffin Dunne, Rosanna Arquette, and Linda Fiorentino. The film follows Paul Hackett, a man who falls head over heels for a woman he meets in a nightclub and finds himself spending a night of madness and misadventures in Soho, New York City.

Plot

Paul Hackett (Griffin Dunne) is an insurance company clerk living in New York City. One night, while out with friends, he meets a woman named Marcy (Rosanna Arquette) in a nightclub. Paul is immediately attracted to her and asks her out. Marcy agrees, but things don’t go as planned.

Paul and Marcy end up at a bar, where Marcy meets a friend of hers, Vinny (Paul Mazursky). Vinny invites Paul to his place, where Paul meets his assistant, Kiki (Linda Fiorentino). Paul finds himself spending the night with Kiki, but things don’t go well and Paul runs away.

Themes

  • The search for love: After Hours is a film about the search for love. Paul is a man who is looking for love, but his nighttime adventures in Soho are a failure.
  • The madness of the city: After Hours is also a film about the madness of the city. Soho is a chaotic and disorienting place, and Paul finds himself losing his mind in its confusion.
  • The absurdist comedy: After Hours is a funny film, but it is also an absurdist film. Paul’s adventures are often surreal and absurd, and the film creates a sense of disorientation and confusion.

Reception

After Hours was a critical success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, performances, and soundtrack. It was also a commercial success, grossing over $20 million at the box office.

The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Original Screenplay and Best Cinematography.

After Hours is a film that has had a significant impact on popular culture. The film has been quoted and parodied countless times, and it is considered to be one of Martin Scorsese’s most representative films.

Review

Beautifully surreal with yet another unique Scorsese view of New York. The film is truly creative and wildly imaginative and Scorsese dabbles in black comedy. After Hours is a 1985 cult film that went unnoticed upon its release.

Maybe it didn’t stir up controversy, or it didn’t have the star power of other Martin Scorsese films like Color of Money. After Hours, a one-night odyssey, is Scorsese’s most overtly grotesque film, and perhaps his most bizarre.

The Goonies (1985)

The Goonies is a 1985 American adventure comedy film directed and co-produced by Richard Donner from a screenplay by Chris Columbus based on a story by Steven Spielberg, who also produced the film. It stars Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen, Corey Feldman, Kerri Green, Martha Plimpton, and Ke Huy Quan, with supporting roles by John Matuszak, Anne Ramsey, Robert Davi, Joe Pantoliano, and Mary Ellen Trainor.

Plot

A group of young misfits called The Goonies discover an ancient map that shows the location of a legendary pirate’s treasure. They set out on an adventure to find the treasure, but they are soon chased by a family of criminals who also want the treasure for themselves.

Reception

The Goonies was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $125 million at the box office, making it one of the highest-grossing films of 1985. It was praised for its performances, direction, and special effects. It was also nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Sound Editing and Best Original Score.

Review

The Goonies is a fun and engaging film that has entertained generations of audiences. The film is full of hilarious gags, fantastical creatures, and adrenaline-pumping action sequences.

The film’s cast is excellent, with Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen, Corey Feldman, Kerri Green, Martha Plimpton, and Ke Huy Quan giving memorable performances. Richard Donner’s direction is solid and his special effects are still impressive today.

cult-movie

Out of Africa (1985)

Out of Africa is a 1985 American epic romantic drama film directed by Sydney Pollack, and starring Meryl Streep and Robert Redford. The film is based on the 1937 memoir of the same name by Danish author Karen Blixen.

Plot

The film tells the story of Karen Blixen, a young Danish woman who moves to Kenya in 1914 to marry Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke. The two settle down on a coffee plantation, but their marriage is unhappy and Bror is a poor manager.

Karen falls in love with Denys Finch-Hatton, an English big-game hunter and aviator. The two embark on a passionate affair, but their story is destined to end in tragedy.

Reception

Out of Africa was a critical and commercial success. The film won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress (Meryl Streep), Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Original Score.

Review

Out of Africa is an epic and romantic film that has captured the imagination of audiences around the world. The film is well-directed by Sydney Pollack and features an exceptional cast.

Meryl Streep is extraordinary in the role of Karen Blixen, bringing to life a complex and fascinating character. Robert Redford is equally good as Denys Finch-Hatton, a romantic and idealistic man.

The film is a celebration of the beauty of Africa and the love that can blossom between two people from different worlds.

Back to the Future (1985) 

Back to the Future (1985) is a 1985 American science fiction film directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson, and Crispin Glover. The film tells the story of Marty McFly, a teenager who is accidentally sent back in time to 1955 by Doc Brown, an eccentric scientist.

Plot

Marty McFly is a teenager from Hill Valley, California, who lives with his parents Lorraine and George. Marty is a fan of rock music and dreams of becoming a musician.

One day, Marty meets Doc Brown, an eccentric scientist who has built a time machine based on a DeLorean automobile. Doc asks Marty to help him test the time machine, and Marty agrees.

During the test, the time machine malfunctions and Marty is accidentally sent back in time to 1955. Marty finds himself living in the past, where he meets his parents as young people.

Marty must find a way to get back to the present without changing the course of history. In the meantime, he must also avoid meeting himself as a child, otherwise he could create a time paradox.

Reception

Back to the Future was a critical and commercial success. The film won an Academy Award for Best Sound Editing and was nominated for Best Film Editing. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $381 million worldwide.

Review

Back to the Future is a funny and exciting film that has made audiences of all ages laugh and cry. The film is well-written and directed, with a script full of gags and memorable moments.

Michael J. Fox is extraordinary in the role of Marty McFly, capturing the charisma and energy of the character. Christopher Lloyd is equally good in the role of Doc Brown, creating an eccentric and charming character.

Back to the Future is a classic science fiction film that continues to be enjoyed by audiences of all ages. The film is a timeless story that is still funny and exciting today as it was in 1985.

The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)

The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985) is a 1985 American comedy-fantasy film directed by Woody Allen and starring Mia Farrow, Jeff Daniels, and Danny Aiello. The film tells the story of Cecilia, a bored and frustrated housewife who finds comfort in classic cinema. One day, Cecilia sees an actor from a 1930s film, Tom Baxter, step out of the screen and into her life.

Plot

Cecilia is a middle-aged American housewife living in New York with her abusive and oppressive husband, George. Cecilia is bored and frustrated with her life, and finds comfort in classic cinema. One day, Cecilia sees a 1930s film called “The Purple Rose of Cairo” and falls in love with the protagonist, Tom Baxter.

Later, Cecilia returns to the cinema to see the film again, and Tom Baxter steps out of the screen and into her life. Tom is a kind and charming man, and Cecilia falls in love with him. The two begin a clandestine relationship, which takes them on a journey through time and space.

Reception

The Purple Rose of Cairo was a critical and commercial success. The film won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay and was nominated for Best Picture. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $60 million worldwide.

Review

The Purple Rose of Cairo is a comedy-fantasy film that has entertained and moved audiences of all ages. The film is well-written and directed, with a script full of humor and touching moments.

Mia Farrow is extraordinary in the role of Cecilia, capturing her charisma and vulnerability. Jeff Daniels is equally good in the role of Tom Baxter, creating a charming and mysterious character.

Witness (1985)

Witness (1985) is a 1985 American thriller film directed by Peter Weir and starring Harrison Ford, Kelly McGillis, Lukas Haas, and Alexander Godunov. The film tells the story of John Book, a Philadelphia police detective who is forced to go into hiding in an Amish community after witnessing a murder.

Plot

John Book is a Philadelphia police detective who is assigned to protect Samuel Lapp, a young Amish boy who has witnessed a drug-related murder. Book is forced to go into hiding in the Amish community, where he must learn to live according to their rules and traditions.

Meanwhile, the drug gang responsible for the murder is on Samuel’s trail. Book must protect the boy and his family, but he must also confront his own beliefs and prejudices.

Reception

Witness was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its direction, screenplay, performances, and cinematography. The film won two Academy Awards: Best Director for Peter Weir and Best Film Editing for Thom Noble.

Review

Witness is a film that has had a profound impact on popular culture. The film is a fascinating portrait of the Amish community and an exciting story of suspense and adventure.

The film was praised for its ability to create an atmosphere of realism and tension. Peter Weir’s direction is masterful and John Seale’s cinematography is breathtaking. The performances of the actors are all excellent, particularly that of Harrison Ford as John Book.

Highlander (1986)

Highlander (1986) is a fantasy action film directed by Russell Mulcahy and starring Christopher Lambert, Michael Ironside, Sean Connery, Clancy Brown, and Roxanne Hart. The film follows Connor MacLeod, an immortal Scottish swordsman who must battle other immortals in order to become the last one standing.

Plot

In 1582, Connor MacLeod (Christopher Lambert) is a young Scottish warrior who witnesses the death of his friend at the hands of an immortal named Kurgan (Clancy Brown). Connor discovers that he is also an immortal and is trained by a fellow immortal named Ramirez (Sean Connery) to prepare for the final battle between the immortals.

In 1985, Connor is living in New York City as a history teacher. He is haunted by the memory of Kurgan and is determined to defeat him once and for all. He is also attracted to a woman named Brenda Wyatt (Roxanne Hart), who is unaware of his true nature.

Themes

  • Immortality: Highlander is a film about the concept of immortality. The film explores the benefits and drawbacks of living forever, and it asks the question of what it means to be human.
  • The hero’s journey: Highlander is also a film about the hero’s journey. Connor is a reluctant hero who must overcome his own fears and insecurities in order to fulfill his destiny.
  • Good versus evil: Highlander is a film about good versus evil. Connor represents good, while Kurgan represents evil. The film is a classic battle between the forces of light and darkness.

Reception

Highlander was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, special effects, and performances. It was also a commercial success, grossing over $60 million at the box office.

The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, for Best Original Song, Best Original Score, and Best Sound Mixing.

Review

A French-American star playing a Scotsman (Christopher Lambert) and also a Scotsman playing an immortal Spaniard (Sean Connery) – what could be better? The defense of eternal life in both 16th century Scotland and 1980s New York truly struck a chord with the public.

A memorable score by Queen, Russell Mulcahy’s film is full of legendary sword fights and a frightening villain in The Kurgan played by prolific star Clancy Brown.

Stand By Me (1986)

Stand by Me (1986) is a coming-of-age adventure drama film directed by Rob Reiner and starring Wil Wheaton, River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, and Jerry O’Connell. Based on the Stephen King novella The Body, the film follows four friends who set out on a journey to find the dead body of a missing boy.

Plot

In the summer of 1959, four friends in Castle Rock, Oregon – Gordie Lachance (Wil Wheaton), Chris Chambers (River Phoenix), Teddy Duchamp (Corey Feldman), and Vern Tessio (Jerry O’Connell) – hear about the disappearance of a local boy named Ray Brower. Inspired by stories of bravery and heroism, they decide to set out on a journey to find Ray’s body, hoping to earn respect and admiration from their peers.

Themes

  • Coming of age: Stand by Me is a classic coming-of-age story that explores the transition from childhood to adulthood. The four boys embark on a journey that marks a turning point in their lives, as they face challenges that force them to grow and mature.
  • Friendship: The film emphasizes the importance of friendship and camaraderie. The bond between the four boys provides them with support, encouragement, and a sense of belonging, especially as they face difficult situations.
  • Self-discovery: Stand by Me is a story of self-discovery. The boys’ journey allows them to learn more about themselves, their strengths, and their weaknesses. They confront their fears and insecurities, leading to personal growth and self-acceptance.
  • Facing reality: The film explores the harsh realities of life and death. The boys’ encounter with the dead body forces them to confront the fragility of life and the inevitability of death. They learn to accept the realities of the world and appreciate the preciousness of life.

Reception

Stand by Me was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its performances, direction, screenplay, and cinematography. The film received numerous accolades, including nominations for two Academy Awards: Best Original Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor for River Phoenix.

Stand by Me has had a lasting impact on popular culture. The film’s themes and characters have resonated with audiences worldwide, and it has become a beloved classic of coming-of-age cinema. The film’s soundtrack, featuring songs by Ben E. King, The Animals, and The Drifters, has also become iconic.

Review

For many people born in the 70s or 60s, Stand By Me is the cult film of the 80s that brought together cinephiles and ordinary spectators. It is certainly among the best films of the 1980s. The film has a beauty and depth that seems to resonate with every generation.

An intense and engaging feeling of youthful nostalgia that becomes a profound reflection on the meaning of human life. Stand by me is an ageless masterpiece film with a following of loyal fans who celebrate it every year, a fixed point in the memories of the youngest for the initiatory passage between the years of childhood and adulthood, an uncommon film that it always gets better as time goes by.

Aliens – Scontro finale (1986)

Aliens (1986) is a science fiction film directed by James Cameron and starring Sigourney Weaver, Michael Biehn, Lance Henriksen, and Carrie Henn. The film is the sequel to “Alien” (1979) and tells the story of Ellen Ripley, the sole survivor of the Alien attack on the Nostromo.

Plot

Twenty-five years after the incident on the Nostromo, Ripley is rescued by a spaceship and brought to Earth. However, her story is doubted, and she is confined to a psychiatric hospital.

A few years later, another spaceship, the Auriga, is attacked by a horde of Aliens. The Auriga is a prison ship carrying a group of prisoners, including a teenager named Rebecca “Newt” Jorden.

Ripley is contacted by Burke, an agent of the Weyland-Yutani Corporation, who convinces her to join a squad of space marines to evacuate the Auriga.

Themes

“Aliens” explores themes such as survival, courage, and maternity. The film is an intense action epic that is also a powerful portrayal of the strength of women.

The movie also delves into the nature of horror. The Aliens are terrifying creatures representing the fear of the unknown and death.

Analysis

The film is also noteworthy for its direction, screenplay, cinematography, and soundtrack. James Cameron’s direction is epic and engaging. The screenplay by James Cameron and David Giler is well-written and engaging. Adrian Biddle’s cinematography is beautiful and evocative. James Horner’s soundtrack is iconic and memorable.

Reception

“Aliens” was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, performances, cinematography, and soundtrack. The film was a box office hit and contributed to making Sigourney Weaver a star.

9 1/2 Weeks (1986)

9 1/2 Weeks (1986) is an erotic drama film directed by Adrian Lyne and starring Kim Basinger and Mickey Rourke. The film tells the story of Elizabeth McGraw, a married woman who embarks on a clandestine affair with John Gray, a businessman.

Plot

Elizabeth McGraw (Kim Basinger) is a married woman who lives in New York City. She is a beautiful and sophisticated woman, but she is also bored and dissatisfied with her married life.

One day, Elizabeth meets John Gray (Mickey Rourke), a charming and mysterious businessman. The two fall madly in love and begin a clandestine affair.

The relationship between Elizabeth and John is based on sex and play. The two challenge each other to experiment with new forms of eroticism.

Their relationship is intense and passionate, but it is also dangerous. Elizabeth is willing to risk everything for John, but she is not sure if he is willing to do the same.

Themes

9 1/2 Weeks is a film that explores themes such as eroticism, play, risk, and love. The film is a provocative portrait of human sexuality.

The film is also an exploration of the nature of desire. Elizabeth and John are driven by mutual desire, but their desire is also a form of escape from their everyday lives.

Analysis

The film is also notable for its direction, screenplay, cinematography, and score. Adrian Lyne’s direction is elegant and sensual. The screenplay by Sarah Kernochan and Zalman King is well-written and engaging. The cinematography by Peter Biziou is beautiful and evocative. The score by Giorgio Moroder is iconic and memorable.

Reception

9 1/2 Weeks was a critical and commercial success. It was praised for its direction, screenplay, performances, cinematography, and score. The film was a box office hit and helped to make Kim Basinger a star.

Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

Big Trouble in Little China is a 1986 American action, comedy, and fantasy film directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell, Kim Cattrall, and Dennis Dun. The film is set in San Francisco and tells the story of Jack Burton, a trucker who finds himself caught up in a battle between supernatural forces.

Plot

Jack Burton is a Chinatown trucker who works for his best friend, Wang Chi. One day, Wang Chi is tasked with transporting the princess Miao Yin to Chinatown. However, Miao Yin is kidnapped by Lo Pan, an evil sorcerer who lives in an underground world.

Jack Burton offers to help Wang Chi save Miao Yin. Together, they embark on a dangerous journey through the underground world, where they must face fantastical creatures and impossible challenges.

Reception

Big Trouble in Little China was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $33 million at the box office, becoming one of the highest-grossing films of 1986.

The film was praised for its action sequences, its humor, and its originality. It was also nominated for a Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film.

Review

Big Trouble in Little China is a fun and engaging film that has entertained generations of audiences. The film is full of hilarious gags, fantastical creatures, and adrenaline-pumping action sequences.

Kurt Russell is perfect in the role of Jack Burton, a charismatic and ironic character. Kim Cattrall is charming and mysterious as Miao Yin. Dennis Dun is convincing as Wang Chi, a loyal and courageous man.

John Carpenter directs the film with mastery, creating a unique and engaging atmosphere. The action sequences are masterfully choreographed and the fantastical creatures are realized with special effects that still impress today.

Big Trouble in Little China is a classic 1980s film that continues to be enjoyed by audiences of all ages.

The Fly (1986)

The Fly is a 1986 American science fiction horror film directed and co-written by David Cronenberg. It is a remake of the 1958 film The Fly, both based on the short story The Fly (1957) by George Langelaan.

Plot

Seth Brundle, a brilliant scientist, is working on a molecular beam teleportation machine. One day, during an experiment, a fly accidentally ends up in the machine with Brundle. The experiment is a success, but Brundle begins to undergo strange changes.

His body begins to merge with that of the fly, and soon he finds himself turning into a hybrid creature. Brundle becomes increasingly violent and unstable, and his relationship with journalist Veronica Quaife, who helped him develop the machine, begins to deteriorate.

Reception

The Fly was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $60 million at the box office, becoming one of the highest-grossing films of 1986. It was praised for its special effects, David Cronenberg’s direction, and Jeff Goldblum’s performance as Seth Brundle.

Review

The Fly is a disturbing and fascinating horror film that has left its mark on cinema history. The film is well-directed by David Cronenberg, who creates an atmosphere of suspense and disgust.

Jeff Goldblum is extraordinary in the role of Seth Brundle, bringing to life a complex and tragic character. Geena Davis is also good in the role of Veronica Quaife, a woman who finds herself entangled in a love affair with a monstrous creature.

The film’s special effects are still impressive today, and they contribute to creating a unique visual experience.

The Fly is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is:

  • Horror: The Fly is a horror film that explores the themes of mutation, transformation, and loss of identity.
  • Science fiction: The Fly is a science fiction film that presents an original and disturbing idea.
  • Special effects: The Fly is a film that made use of innovative special effects for the time.
  • Iconography: The Fly created some of the most iconic characters and images from 1980s cinema, such as Seth Brundle’s hybrid creature.

Platoon (1986)

Platoon (1986) is a 1986 American war film written and directed by Oliver Stone, starring Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe, Charlie Sheen, Keith David, Kevin Dillon, John C. McGinley, Forest Whitaker, and Johnny Depp. The film follows a young soldier named Chris Taylor as he is sent to Vietnam and becomes involved in a moral battle between two sergeants.

Plot

Chris Taylor, a young and idealistic college student, volunteers for the Vietnam War in 1967. He is sent to serve in a platoon led by Sergeant Barnes, a brutal and sadistic man who uses the war as an excuse to indulge in his own sadistic pleasures.

Taylor soon finds himself caught in the middle of a battle between Barnes and Sergeant Elias, a more humane and compassionate leader. Elias believes in fighting with honor and decency, while Barnes is willing to do whatever it takes to win, even if it means sacrificing the lives of his own men.

As the war drags on, Taylor becomes increasingly disillusioned with the violence and brutality of the conflict. He is also torn between his loyalty to his fellow soldiers and his growing sense of right and wrong.

Reception

Platoon was a critical and commercial success. The film won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Tom Berenger), Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, and Best Original Score. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $138 million worldwide.

Review

Platoon is a powerful and moving film that captures the horrors of war and the moral dilemmas faced by soldiers. The film is well-directed by Oliver Stone, who uses his own experiences as a Vietnam War veteran to create a realistic and authentic portrayal of the conflict.

The performances in Platoon are all outstanding. Tom Berenger is excellent as Sergeant Barnes, giving a nuanced and deeply disturbing performance. Willem Dafoe is equally good as Sergeant Elias, creating a character who is both compassionate and troubled. Charlie Sheen is also memorable as Chris Taylor, portraying the character’s transformation from idealistic young man to disillusioned war veteran.

Platoon is a must-see for anyone interested in the Vietnam War or the moral complexities of war in general. The film is a powerful and unforgettable cinematic experience.

Full Metal Jacket (1987)

Full Metal Jacket (1987) is a war film directed by Stanley Kubrick and written by Kubrick, Michael Herr, and Gustav Hasford. The film stars Matthew Modine as Joker, a young recruit who enlists in the United States Marine Corps to fight in the Vietnam War.

Plot

The film opens at Parris Island, South Carolina, in June 1967. The young recruit J.T. “Joker” Davis joins the United States Marine Corps to fight in the Vietnam War. Joker is an idealistic young man who believes in justice and freedom. However, he is quickly put to the test by the brutal Gunnery Sergeant Hartman, who is tasked with turning recruits into killing machines.

Hartman subjects the recruits to a grueling and violent training regimen designed to break them down and rebuild them as Marines. Joker and the other recruits are forced to endure verbal and physical abuse, and they are subjected to increasingly challenging physical and mental tests.

Reception

Full Metal Jacket was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its realism, its performances, and its direction.

The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay. It won an Academy Award for Best Sound Editing.

Review

Full Metal Jacket is a powerful and disturbing film that explores the dehumanizing effects of war. It is a film that has been praised for its realism, its performances, and its direction.

The film is divided into two parts, each with its own tone and theme. The first part, set at Parris Island, is a satirical portrait of the brutality and madness of Marine training. The second part, set in Vietnam, is a realistic and disturbing exploration of the violence and madness of war.

The film features an outstanding cast, led by Matthew Modine as Joker. Modine gives a powerful and moving performance that captures Joker’s evolution from naive idealist to cynical and disillusioned soldier.

Stanley Kubrick’s direction is masterful. Kubrick creates a dark and oppressive atmosphere that captures the brutality and madness of war.

Curiosities

  • The film is based on the 1979 semi-autobiographical novel “The Short-Timers” by Gustav Hasford.
  • The film was shot in England and the United States.
  • The film was produced by Stanley Kubrick and Michael Herr.
  • The film’s score was composed by Abigail Mead.

The Untouchables (1987)

The Untouchables is a 1987 American crime film directed by Brian De Palma and starring Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro, and Andy Garcia. The film tells the story of Eliot Ness, a federal agent who is committed to bringing down Al Capone, the mob boss who controls Chicago during the Prohibition era.

Plot

Eliot Ness is a federal agent who is sent to Chicago to combat alcohol bootlegging during the Prohibition era. Ness joins a group of incorruptible agents, including Jim Malone, George Stone, and Oscar Wallace, and begins to investigate Al Capone, the mob boss who controls the city.

Ness and his team must face the threats and corruption of Capone and his men, but they are determined to stop him. After a series of investigations and confrontations, Ness and his men are able to bring Capone to justice.

Reception

The Untouchables was a critical and commercial success. The film grossed over $106 million at the box office, becoming one of the highest-grossing films of 1987.

The film was praised for its performances, direction, and soundtrack. It was also nominated for four Academy Awards, winning the award for Best Art Direction.

Review

The Untouchables is a gripping and engaging film that has entertained generations of audiences. The film is full of suspense, action, and twists.

The film’s cast is outstanding, with Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro, and Andy Garcia giving memorable performances. Brian De Palma’s direction is solid and Ennio Morricone’s soundtrack is iconic.

The Untouchables is a classic 1980s film that continues to be enjoyed by audiences of all ages.

La Famiglia (1987)

La Famiglia (1987) is an Italian drama film directed by Ettore Scola. The film tells the story of a middle-class Roman family, from 1906 to 1986.

Plot

The film opens with the baptism of Carlo, the eldest son of the family. Over the decades, the family evolves and changes, but some values always remain the same, such as love, solidarity, and the strength of the family.

Reception

La Famiglia was a critical and commercial success. The film was presented in competition at the 40th Cannes Film Festival and won the award for Best Actress for Stefania Sandrelli.

Review

La Famiglia is a moving and melancholic film that offers a glimpse of Italian history in the 20th century. The film is well-directed by Ettore Scola and features an exceptional cast, including Vittorio Gassman, Stefania Sandrelli, Fanny Ardant, and Philippe Noiret.

The Last Emperor (1987)

The Last Emperor (1987) is a 1987 epic biographical drama film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci and starring John Lone, Peter O’Toole, Joan Chen, Ruocheng Ying, and Dennis Dun. The film tells the story of Pu Yi, the last emperor of China, from his childhood to his imprisonment in a labor camp during the Cultural Revolution.

Plot

Pu Yi is born in 1908, at the age of three, and is crowned emperor of China. He lives a life of luxury and privilege in the Forbidden City, but his childhood is marked by the death of his mother and isolation from the real world.

At the age of 12, Pu Yi is deposed by the 1911 Revolution and is forced to live in exile in Japan. In Japan, Pu Yi is educated as a Japanese prince and begins to develop an affinity for fascism.

In 1931, Japan invades Manchuria and Pu Yi is crowned emperor of Manchukuo, a Japanese puppet state. Under Japanese rule, Pu Yi becomes a cruel and authoritarian dictator.

Reception

The Last Emperor was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its direction, cinematography, editing, soundtrack, performances, and special effects. The film won nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Actor for John Lone.

Review

The Last Emperor is a film that has had a profound impact on popular culture. The film is a complex and multifaceted portrait of a man who lived through some of the most turbulent periods in Chinese history.

The film has been praised for its ability to evoke the atmosphere and culture of China in a bygone era. Bertolucci’s direction is masterful and Vittorio Storaro’s cinematography is breathtaking. The performances of the actors are all excellent, particularly that of John Lone as Pu Yi.

They Live (1988) 

They Live (1988) is a 1988 American science fiction action horror film written and directed by John Carpenter, based on the 1963 short story “Eight O’Clock in the Morning” by Ray Nelson. The film stars Roddy Piper, Keith David, Meg Foster, and Peter Jason, and follows a drifter named Nada who discovers a pair of sunglasses that allow him to see the world as it truly is, revealing that the human population is being brainwashed and controlled by subliminal messages embedded in mass media.

Plot

Nada is a drifter who wanders into a small town in California. He is soon met with hostility from the locals, who seem to be under a strange spell. Nada finds himself in a fight with a group of men, and he is eventually arrested by the local sheriff, who confiscates his belongings.

While in jail, Nada is visited by a mysterious man who gives him a pair of sunglasses. The man tells Nada that the sunglasses will allow him to see the world as it truly is. Nada is skeptical, but he puts on the sunglasses anyway.

To Nada’s surprise, the sunglasses work. He can now see subliminal messages embedded in mass media that are designed to control people’s thoughts and behavior. Nada soon realizes that the entire world is under the control of these subliminal messages.

Reception

They Live was a critical and commercial success. The film was praised for its social commentary, its action sequences, and its performances. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $13 million worldwide.

Review

One of the best 80s dystopian cult films of all time about the manipulation of humanity by the ruling elite through the mass media. The film was a minor success upon its release, debuting at No. 1 at the North American box office. It originally received negative reviews due to its social criticism.

However, like other John Carpenter films, it later became a cult film. It is currently considered by many to be an underrated work. The film entered pop culture and even had an influence on street art.

Rain Man (1988)

Rain Man (1988) is a 1988 American drama film written and directed by Barry Levinson and starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. The film follows Charlie Babbitt, a selfish man who learns that his estranged father has left a fortune to his autistic brother Raymond, who he never knew existed. Charlie sets out to get a share of the inheritance and takes Raymond on a cross-country road trip.

Plot

Charlie Babbitt is a self-centered and ambitious car salesman in Los Angeles. When his estranged father dies, Charlie learns that he has inherited a $3 million fortune. However, he is shocked to discover that the bulk of the inheritance has been left to Raymond, his older brother who is an autistic savant.

Charlie had never met Raymond before, and he is initially reluctant to take on the responsibility of caring for him. However, he soon realizes that Raymond is a very special person with unique abilities. As Charlie and Raymond travel across the country, they develop a deep bond and Charlie learns to appreciate the value of family and love.

Reception

Rain Man was a critical and commercial success. The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Dustin Hoffman), and Best Original Screenplay. It was also a box office hit, grossing over $354 million worldwide.

Review

Rain Man is a moving and unforgettable film that explores the themes of family, love, and acceptance. Dustin Hoffman gives an Oscar-winning performance as Raymond, and Tom Cruise is equally good as Charlie. The film is also well-directed by Barry Levinson, who creates a warm and compassionate atmosphere.

Subscribe

Dead Poets Society (1989)

Dead Poets Society is a 1989 drama film directed by Peter Weir and starring Robin Williams.

Plot

The film is set in 1959 and tells the story of John Keating, a young English teacher who is transferred to the prestigious Welton Academy, a boys’ boarding school in Vermont. Keating is a charismatic and inspiring teacher who encourages his students to think critically and embrace life.

The film opens with the death of Mr. Keating, a former English teacher who was beloved by his students. His memory inspires a group of students, including Neil Perry, Todd Anderson, and Charlie Dalton, to found a secret club called “The Dead Poets Society.”

Keating, who is a former member of the club, is transferred to Welton and soon realizes that the school is a rigid and conservative place. His students are forced to follow the rules and conform to the expectations of their parents.

Reception

Dead Poets Society was a critical and commercial success. It received eight Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor for Robin Williams. It won the award for Best Original Screenplay.

Review

Dead Poets Society is a powerful and moving film about the importance of free thinking and creativity. The film is well-made and well-acted, with Robin Williams giving a memorable performance.

The film’s story is uplifting and inspiring. Keating is an extraordinary teacher who inspires his students to think critically and to follow their dreams. His teachings have a profound impact on his students, who begin to see the world in a new way.

The film’s soundtrack is iconic and contributes to creating the film’s atmosphere. The songs are carefully chosen and perfectly fit the story.

Trivia

  • The film was shot in Canada, in and around Vancouver.
  • The character of John Keating is inspired by Robin Williams himself, who was a drama teacher before becoming an actor.
  • The phrase “Carpe diem” (“Seize the day”) is a Latin phrase that means “Seize the present moment.”
  • The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor for Robin Williams. It won the award for Best Original Screenplay.

Dead Poets Society is a film that embodies many of the elements that defined 1980s cinema. The film is uplifting and moving, with a story that speaks to the importance of free thinking and creativity. The film is also well-made, with masterful performances and an iconic soundtrack.

Indiecinema

Indiecinema

Hundreds of Movies and Documentaries Selected Without Limits

New movies every week. Watch on any device, without any ads. Cancel at any time.