Dramatic Comedy Films to Watch

Watch Selected Independent and Cult Films

Watch hundreds of rare independent and arthouse films, cult films and hand-picked documentaries from around the world with a single subscription, on any device. No limits, no ads.

Table of Contents

Dramatic comedy, or dramedy, is a film genre that blends elements of comedy and drama. Films of this genre often explore serious and complex themes, but they do so with a light and ironic tone. This mixture of genres can create a unique and engaging cinematic experience, making the audience both laugh and feel moved at the same time.

History of the Genre

The origins of dramatic comedy can be traced back to ancient theater, where works that combined comedic and tragic elements were common. In modern times, the genre found its full expression in cinema, where it gained great popularity starting in the 1970s.

In these films, the comedic tone is often used to lighten the seriousness of the topics explored, such as generational miscommunication, war, and the mafia.

Subscribe

Characteristics of the Dramatic Comedy Genre

Dramatic comedy films have several distinctive characteristics that set them apart from purely comedic or dramatic films.

Dramatic comedy films often explore serious and complex themes, such as death, illness, disability, love, loss, and personal growth. These themes are often approached in a realistic and nuanced manner, without resorting to easy solutions or stereotypes.

Despite dealing with serious themes, dramatic comedy films maintain a light and ironic tone. This tone is often used to alleviate the gravity of the subjects and to make the storytelling more engaging.

Characters in dramatic comedy films are often complex and multifaceted. They are not simple heroes or villains but real people with strengths and flaws. This makes the characters more believable and relatable to the audience.

Dramatic comedy films often feature a distinctive cinematic style that combines elements of comedy and drama. This style can be characterized by an ironic use of the soundtrack, cinematography that alternates between moments of light and darkness, or direction that alternates between comedic and dramatic scenes.

Examples of Complex and Multifaceted Characters Some examples of complex and multifaceted characters in dramatic comedy films include:

  • Benjamin Braddock in “The Graduate” (1967) directed by Mike Nichols: a young man in an existential crisis.
  • Hawkeye Pierce in “MASH” (1970) directed by Robert Altman: a sarcastic and cynical doctor.
  • Will Hunting in “Good Will Hunting” (1997) directed by Gus Van Sant: an intelligent yet troubled young man.

Dramatic Comedy Films to Watch

Here is a selection of the best dramatic comedy films in the history of cinema, a list that spans masterpieces of the genre from its inception in the 1920s to the present day. These extraordinary films skillfully blend comedic and dramatic elements to provide unique cinematic experiences that can make us both laugh and be moved at the same time. From timeless classics like “It Happened One Night” to modern works like “Parasite,” this list celebrates the versatility and depth of dramatic comedy, demonstrating how the genre can tackle serious and complex themes with wit and intelligence. Each film is a precious piece in the history of cinema and continues to inspire audiences with its unique combination of humor and pathos.

Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927)

“Aurora” is a silent film masterpiece from 1927, also known as “Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans.” Directed by the renowned filmmaker F.W. Murnau, it stands as an exceptional example of auteur and independent cinema of its time. The film distinguishes itself through its masterful use of visuals and the expressiveness of its actors, relying heavily on non-verbal storytelling.

The plot of “Aurora” delves into the dynamics of a marital relationship, with George O’Brien portraying a man who is tempted by a woman from the city, played by Margaret Livingston. This encounter jeopardizes his marriage to his beloved wife, portrayed by Janet Gaynor. The film follows this man’s journey through the temptations of city life and his return to the simplicity of rural life with his wife and child. The narrative is infused with symbolism, and the use of natural elements and everyday objects in the film contributes to a deep and emotional visual storytelling.

The cinematography of “Aurora” is extraordinary for its time, with F.W. Murnau and cinematographer Charles Rosher innovatively using light and shadow to create a compelling visual atmosphere. This significantly enhances the narrative and character development. The city scenes are filled with a sense of frenzy and temptation, while the countryside scenes exude tranquility and a return to the essential.

The film “Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans” is a testament to the power of silent cinema in evoking deep emotions and conveying a complex story without the need for verbal dialogue. The performances of the leads, Janet Gaynor and George O’Brien, are exceptional and manage to convey a wide range of emotions through facial expressions and body language. This ability to narrate a universal story through visual art is what makes “Aurora” an iconic work of auteur and independent cinema.

WATCH THE MOVIE

The Great Illusion (1937)

“The Great Illusion” is a 1937 French film directed by Jean Renoir. This masterpiece of French silent cinema, also known as “The Great Illusion” in English, is an extraordinary work that explores the theme of war and social divisions.

The film is set during World War I and follows the story of some French prisoners of war, including Lieutenant Maréchal and Captain de Boeldieu, who are held in a German prisoner of war camp. The story focuses on their friendship and the relationships they develop with the camp commander and the other prisoners.

Renoir uses the story to examine the social and cultural differences among the characters, highlighting how these divisions are illusory and insignificant in the face of the devastation of war. The film addresses themes of humanity, tolerance, and friendship in a context of conflict and division.

The cinematography in “The Great Illusion” is remarkable for its time, and Renoir’s direction is exceptional. This film is considered one of the masterpieces of independent and art cinema and has left an indelible mark on the history of cinema.

cult-movie

It Happened One Night (1934)

“It Happened One Night” is a 1934 film directed by Frank Capra. This classic romantic comedy has made an indelible mark in the history of cinema.

The film follows the story of Ellie Andrews, played by Claudette Colbert, a rebellious young woman who runs away from an arranged marriage to a wealthy and arrogant man. During her escape, Ellie encounters an unemployed journalist, Peter Warne, played by Clark Gable. Together, they embark on a series of adventures as they travel by bus across the United States to New York.

“It Happened One Night” is known for establishing some of the classic tropes of romantic comedies, including initial clashes and the transformation of the main characters as they fall in love with each other. The film received numerous awards, including the five major Oscars at the Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (for Clark Gable), Best Actress (for Claudette Colbert), and Best Original Screenplay.

The movie was a major commercial success and influenced many future romantic comedies. The chemistry between the two lead actors, Colbert and Gable, was essential to the film’s success. “It Happened One Night” remains an iconic work in the world of art cinema.

The Great Dictator (1940)

“The Great Dictator” is a 1940 film directed by Charlie Chaplin. This is an iconic film that combines comedy with powerful political commentary and is known by the same title in both Italian and English.

The film is a satire of Adolf Hitler’s dictatorial regime and Nazism. Charlie Chaplin plays two main roles in the film: one as the dictator Adenoid Hynkel, clearly inspired by Hitler, and the other as a poor Jewish barber who bears a striking resemblance to the dictator. The plot unfolds as the Jewish barber is mistaken for Hynkel and becomes unwittingly involved in the politics of the regime.

“The Great Dictator” is famous for its stirring final speech in which Chaplin conveys a message of hope and humanity. The film is a masterpiece of cinema and a work that courageously addressed political and ethical themes. Its relevance and emotional power endure to this day.

Sullivan’s Travels (1941)

“Sullivan’s Travels” is a 1941 film. This is a classic comedy directed by Preston Sturges.

The film tells the story of John L. Sullivan, a successful director of light comedies who decides to embark on a journey to experience real poverty and suffering, in order to make a dramatic film reflecting real-life struggles. However, Sullivan’s journey puts him in comical situations and extraordinary adventures, ultimately teaching him important life lessons and the significance of comedy.

“Sullivan’s Travels” is renowned for its insightful reflection on the art of cinema and the role of humor in society. The film offers a unique blend of comedy and contemplation, with exceptional performances by the cast. It is considered a comedy masterpiece that has left a lasting impact on the world of cinema.

Casablanca (1942)

“Casablanca” is a 1942 film. This is a classic romantic drama directed by Michael Curtiz.

The film is set during World War II and primarily takes place in the famous “Rick’s Café Américain” in Casablanca, Morocco. The story follows Rick Blaine, played by Humphrey Bogart, the owner of the establishment, a cynical and neutral man in a world disrupted by war. Everything changes when his former flame, Ilsa Lund, played by Ingrid Bergman, returns to Casablanca with her husband, a resistance fighter.

“Casablanca” is a romantic drama filled with romance and intrigue. The film is celebrated for its outstanding performances, brilliant screenplay, and unforgettable soundtrack. It’s a masterpiece that captures the charm and uncertainty of the wartime period and remains one of the most beloved and quoted films in the history of cinema.

La strada (1954)

“La Strada” is a 1954 film directed by Federico Fellini. This is a masterpiece of Italian cinema, known by the same title in both Italian and English.

The film tells the story of Gelsomina, a young woman played by Giulietta Masina, who is sold by her father to a rugged street performer named Zampanò, portrayed by Anthony Quinn. Together, they travel through small villages, performing street shows. The relationship between the two is at the heart of the narrative, and the film explores themes of poverty, loneliness, and humanity.

“La Strada” is known for its intense exploration of human emotions and the powerful performances of the lead actors. The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 1957 and is considered a classic of independent and art cinema that has left a lasting mark in the history of cinema.

Some Like It Hot (1959)

“Some Like It Hot” is a 1959 film directed by Billy Wilder. This is a renowned comedy with elements of romantic comedy and gangster film.

The film tells the story of two musicians, Joe and Jerry, played by Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon, who witness a gangland massacre and must go into hiding by disguising themselves as women and joining an all-female band on tour. Marilyn Monroe portrays Sugar, one of the band members and the object of Joe’s desires. This situation leads to a series of comical and romantic escapades as they try to conceal their true identities.

“Some Like It Hot” is beloved for its clever humor and memorable performances by the cast, especially Marilyn Monroe. It is considered one of the greatest comedy films of all time and continues to be appreciated for its witty and entertaining spirit.

Two Women (1960)

Two Women (Italian: La ciociara) is a 1960 Italian comedy drama film directed by Vittorio De Sica from a screenplay he co-wrote with Cesare Zavattini, based on the 1957 novel of the same name by Alberto Moravia. The film stars Sophia Loren as Cesira, a widow who flees Rome with her 13-year-old daughter Rosetta (Eleonora Brown) during World War II. They travel to Cesira’s home village in the countryside, where they are caught in the crossfire between the Allied and German armies.

The film was a critical and commercial success, winning two Academy Awards, for Best Actress (Loren) and Best Adapted Screenplay. It was also nominated for five other Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actress (Brown).

Plot

Cesira is a widow who runs a small shop in Rome. When the Allied bombing of the city intensifies, she decides to flee with her 13-year-old daughter Rosetta. They travel to Cesira’s home village in the countryside, where they hope to find safety.

However, the village is not safe. It is caught in the crossfire between the Allied and German armies. Cesira and Rosetta are forced to flee again, this time to a nearby convent.

At the convent, Cesira and Rosetta are safe from the fighting. However, they are still haunted by the violence they have witnessed. Rosetta is particularly traumatized by the events, and she begins to withdraw from her mother.

Eventually, the war ends. Cesira and Rosetta return to Rome, where they begin to rebuild their lives. However, the scars of the war will never be fully erased.

Critical reception

Two Women was critically acclaimed upon its release. The film was praised for its powerful performances, realistic portrayal of war, and moving story.

Academy Awards

  • Best Actress: Sophia Loren
  • Best Adapted Screenplay: Cesare Zavattini, Vittorio De Sica, and Alberto Moravia

Other awards

  • Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film
  • BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Language Film
  • David di Donatello Award for Best Film
  • Nastro d’Argento Award for Best Film
  • Nastro d’Argento Award for Best Actress: Sophia Loren
  • Nastro d’Argento Award for Best Supporting Actress: Eleonora Brown

Legacy

Two Women is considered one of the greatest Italian films of all time. It is a powerful and moving story about the horrors of war and the resilience of the human spirit.

Harold and Maude (1971)

Harold and Maude (1971) is a cult classic American romantic black comedy-drama film directed by Hal Ashby. It stars Bud Cort as Harold, a young man obsessed with death, and Ruth Gordon as Maude, a free-spirited elderly woman who teaches him about the importance of living life to the fullest.

The film follows Harold’s journey from suicidal despair to a joyful embrace of life, thanks to Maude’s influence. Along the way, they fall in love, despite their 60-year age difference.

Harold and Maude is a unique and heartwarming film that celebrates the beauty of life and the importance of living in the moment. It is a film that has resonated with audiences for generations and continues to be relevant today.

Here are some of the key themes of the film:

  • The importance of living life to the fullest: Maude teaches Harold that life is precious and should be cherished. She encourages him to be spontaneous, to take risks, and to find joy in the simple things in life.
  • The power of love: Harold and Maude’s love story is a testament to the fact that love can transcend age, social class, and even death. Their love teaches them both how to be better people and how to live more fulfilling lives.
  • The absurdity of death: Harold’s obsession with death is shown to be ultimately futile. Maude helps him to see that death is a natural part of life and that it should not be feared.

Harold and Maude is a film that will stay with you long after you watch it. It is a film that will make you laugh, cry, and think. It is a film that will inspire you to live your life to the fullest.

MASH (1970)

MASH (1970) is a 1970 American black comedy war film directed by Robert Altman. The film is based on the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker.

The film is set during the Korean War and follows the lives of a group of U.S. Army doctors and nurses working at a mobile army surgical hospital (MASH). The doctors, led by Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce (Donald Sutherland), use humor to cope with the horrors of war.

MASH was a commercial and critical success, winning two Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Film Editing. The film was praised for its humor, realism, and anti-war message.

Here are some of the key themes of the film:

  • Humor as a defense mechanism: The doctors of MASH use humor to cope with the horrors of war. Humor is a way for them to maintain their sanity and not lose hope.
  • The dark side of war: MASH shows the dark side of war, with scenes of violence, death, and suffering. The film does not glorify war, but shows it as a horrible and inhumane experience.
  • The power of friendship: The doctors of MASH are united by a strong sense of friendship. Friendship is what helps them to overcome the horrors of war and maintain their humanity.

MASH is a film that is still relevant today. The film is an important reflection on war and the power of humor as a defense mechanism.

Additional details:

  • The film was a box office hit, grossing over $80 million worldwide.
  • The film was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor (Sutherland).
  • The film was adapted into a successful television series that ran from 1972 to 1983.

Legacy:

MASH is considered one of the greatest war films of all time. The film is a powerful and moving story about the horrors of war and the resilience of the human spirit.

Subscribe

Annie Hall (1977)

Annie Hall (1977) is a romantic comedy-drama film directed by Woody Allen, who also stars in the film alongside Diane Keaton. The film follows the relationship between Alvy Singer (Allen), a neurotic New York comedian, and Annie Hall (Keaton), a free-spirited aspiring actress.

The film is known for its innovative and groundbreaking style, which incorporates elements of fantasy, surrealism, and fourth wall breaking. Allen also uses a variety of filmmaking techniques, such as split screens, animation, and subtitles, to create a unique and visually appealing film.

Annie Hall is a critically acclaimed film that has been praised for its intelligent humor, its realistic portrayal of relationships, and its groundbreaking filmmaking style. The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress for Keaton, and Best Original Screenplay for Allen and Marshall Brickman.

Here are some of the key themes of the film:

  • The nature of love and relationships: Annie Hall explores the complex and often messy nature of love and relationships. The film shows that love is not always easy, but it is worth fighting for.
  • The importance of self-awareness: Alvy Singer is a deeply neurotic and self-obsessed character. However, he eventually learns the importance of self-awareness and accepting himself for who he is.
  • The importance of living in the moment: Annie Hall is a reminder to live in the moment and to cherish the good times. The film shows that life is too short to be wasted on regrets and worries.


Terms of Endearment (1983)

Terms of Endearment (1983) is a comedy-drama film directed by James L. Brooks and starring Shirley MacLaine, Debra Winger, Jack Nicholson, and Jeff Daniels. The film is based on the 1979 novel of the same name by Larry McMurtry.

The film follows the relationship between Aurora Greenway (MacLaine), a fiercely independent and opinionated woman, and her daughter, Emma (Winger), a sensitive and neurotic artist. The film chronicles the ups and downs of their relationship over the course of 30 years, as they face the challenges of life, love, and loss.

Terms of Endearment was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $100 million worldwide and winning five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress for MacLaine, Best Adapted Screenplay for Brooks, and Best Supporting Actor for Nicholson.

The film is known for its realistic and honest portrayal of family life, its heartwarming and humorous moments, and its emotional impact. Terms of Endearment is a classic film that continues to resonate with audiences today.

Here are some of the key themes of the film:

  • The importance of family: Terms of Endearment is a celebration of the importance of family, even though families can be messy and complicated. The film shows that family is the foundation of our lives, and that we should always cherish the people we love.
  • The power of love: Love is a powerful force that can overcome many obstacles. The film shows that love can transcend generations, social class, and even death.
  • The importance of living life to the fullest: Terms of Endearment is a reminder to live life to the fullest and to cherish every moment. The film shows that life is too short to be wasted on regrets and missed opportunities.

The Big Lebowski (1998)

The Big Lebowski (1998) is an American comedy-drama crime film written, produced, and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen. It stars Jeff Bridges as Jeffrey “The Dude” Lebowski, a Los Angeles slacker and avid bowler. The film follows the Dude as he is mistaken for a millionaire of the same name and gets caught up in a kidnapping plot.

The film also stars John Goodman, Julianne Moore, Steve Buscemi, John Turturro, Ben Gazzara, and Philip Seymour Hoffman. It is known for its eccentric characters, its quotable dialogue, and its unique blend of humor and crime.

The Big Lebowski was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $46 million worldwide against a budget of $15 million. It has since become a cult classic and is considered one of the Coen brothers’ best films.

Themes:

  • Nihilism: The Dude is a nihilist, meaning that he believes life has no inherent meaning or purpose. This is reflected in his laid-back attitude and his refusal to get involved in the conflict around him.
  • Identity: The Dude is constantly mistaken for other people, which leads to a number of humorous situations. The film explores the idea of identity and how it is constructed by others.
  • The American Dream: The Dude represents the American Dream, but in a twisted way. He is a slacker who lives off the dole, but he is also content and happy. The film suggests that the American Dream is not always about material success.

Little Miss Sunshine (2006)

Little Miss Sunshine (2006) is an American road comedy-drama film written by Michael Arndt and directed by Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris. The film stars Greg Kinnear, Toni Collette, Steve Carell, Alan Arkin, Paul Dano, and Abigail Breslin. It follows the Hoover family, a dysfunctional group of six people, as they drive across the country to enter their youngest daughter in the Little Miss Sunshine beauty pageant.

Along the way, the Hoovers deal with a variety of challenges, including a broken-down bus, a drug overdose, and a suicidal attempt. But through it all, they learn to support each other and find strength in their family bond.

Little Miss Sunshine was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $100 million worldwide against a budget of $8 million. It won two Academy Awards, for Best Original Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor for Arkin.

Themes:

  • Family: Little Miss Sunshine is a film about the importance of family, even when families are dysfunctional. The Hoover family is far from perfect, but they love each other and support each other through thick and thin.
  • Self-acceptance: Little Miss Sunshine is a film about self-acceptance. Olive Hoover (Breslin) is not a conventional beauty pageant contestant, but she learns to accept herself for who she is.
  • The importance of dreams: Little Miss Sunshine is a film about the importance of following your dreams. Olive Hoover dreams of winning the Little Miss Sunshine pageant, and her family supports her dream, even when it seems impossible.

500 Days of Summer (2009)

(500) Days of Summer is a 2009 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by Marc Webb and starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zooey Deschanel. The film follows the story of Tom Hansen, a young writer who falls in love with Summer Finn, a cynical woman who doesn’t believe in love.

Plot:

Tom Hansen is a young writer who works as an assistant to a greeting card company. One day, he meets Summer Finn, a new employee, and falls head over heels in love with her. Summer is a cynical woman who doesn’t believe in love, but Tom is determined to change her mind.

The story of Tom and Summer is told in a non-linear order, with Tom reflecting on the 500 days of their relationship. The two quickly fall in love and spend happy times together. However, Summer eventually breaks up with Tom, telling him that she is not ready for a serious relationship.

Tom is devastated by the breakup and takes a long time to get over it. In the end, however, he realizes that he needs to move on with his life.

Themes:

  • Love and desire: (500) Days of Summer is a film about love and desire. Tom is a romantic who believes in true love, while Summer is a cynic who doesn’t believe in love. Their story explores the nature of love and desire, and how they can be both positive and negative.
  • Loss and grief: (500) Days of Summer is also a film about loss and grief. Tom is devastated by the breakup with Summer and takes a long time to get over it. His story explores the pain of loss and how it can be difficult to move on.
  • Growth and change: (500) Days of Summer is ultimately a film about growth and change. Tom is a character who grows and changes throughout the film. He learns to overcome his disappointment with Summer and to find happiness on his own.

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

Silver Linings Playbook is a 2012 American romantic comedy-drama film directed by David O. Russell and starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver, and Chris Tucker. The film follows the story of Pat Solitano, a man with bipolar disorder who, after spending eight months in a psychiatric institution, returns to live with his parents.

Plot:

Pat Solitano is a former high school teacher who suffers from bipolar disorder. After discovering that his wife Nikki is cheating on him with his best friend, Pat has an angry outburst and assaults him. For this reason, Pat is sent to a psychiatric institution, where he spends eight months.

After being released from the hospital, Pat returns to live with his parents. He is determined to win back Nikki, but he must first learn to manage his illness.

One day, Pat meets Tiffany Maxwell, a young widow who is looking for a partner for a dance competition. Tiffany is an eccentric and cynical woman, but Pat finds in her someone who understands him.

Pat and Tiffany decide to team up to compete in the dance competition. During their rehearsals, the two grow closer and fall in love.

Themes:

  • Love and healing: Silver Linings Playbook is a film about love and healing. Pat and Tiffany are two people who have experienced trauma and need healing. Their love is a process of mutual healing.
  • Family: Silver Linings Playbook is also a film about family. Pat is a man who has lost his family. The love of his parents and Tiffany helps him find his family again.
  • Hope: Silver Linings Playbook is a film about hope. Pat is a man who has lost hope. Tiffany’s love helps him find hope again.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) is a comedy-drama film written and directed by Wes Anderson. The film stars Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Jude Law, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Léa Seydoux, Saoirse Ronan, Jason Schwartzman, Tom Wilkinson, and Tilda Swinton.

The film tells the story of Gustave H., the legendary concierge of the Grand Budapest Hotel in the fictional Republic of Zubrowka, and his lobby boy, Zero Moustafa. The story is set in the 1930s, and follows Gustave and Zero as they become entangled in a murder investigation.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is a visually stunning film, with Anderson’s signature style on full display. The film is also known for its witty dialogue, its eccentric characters, and its heartwarming story.

Themes:

  • Friendship and loyalty: The Grand Budapest Hotel is a film about friendship and loyalty. Gustave and Zero are two people who are very different from each other, but they are deeply loyal to each other. Their friendship is one of the strongest elements of the film.
  • The importance of kindness: The Grand Budapest Hotel is also a film about the importance of kindness. Gustave is a kind and compassionate man, even though he is often surrounded by people who are cruel and selfish. His kindness is one of the things that makes him such a likable character.
  • The power of hope: The Grand Budapest Hotel is a film about the power of hope. Even though Gustave and Zero face many challenges, they never give up hope. Their hope is one of the things that helps them overcome the obstacles in their path.

Birdman (2014)

Birdman (2014) is a black comedy-drama film directed and written by Alejandro G. Iñárritu. The film stars Michael Keaton as Riggan Thomson, a washed-up actor who is trying to make a comeback by directing, writing, and starring in a Broadway adaptation of Raymond Carver’s short story “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love.”

Keaton is supported by a cast that includes Edward Norton, Emma Stone, Naomi Watts, Amy Ryan, Zach Galifianakis, and Amy Adams.

Birdman is a visually stunning film, with Iñárritu and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki using a single, unbroken shot to create the illusion of a continuous take. The film is also known for its dark humor, its sharp satire, and its exploration of themes such as ego, ambition, and the creative process.

Themes:

  • Ego: Birdman is a film about ego. Riggan Thomson is a man who is so obsessed with his own success that he is willing to sacrifice everything else in order to achieve it. His ego is his greatest strength and his greatest weakness.
  • Ambition: Birdman is also a film about ambition. Riggan is determined to make a comeback and prove to the world that he is still relevant. His ambition drives him to work hard and to create something truly special.
  • The creative process: Birdman is a film about the creative process. Riggan is a man who is struggling to create something new and original. He is constantly doubting himself and his abilities. But in the end, he learns that the creative process is messy and unpredictable, and that the most important thing is to be true to yourself.

Legacy:

Birdman was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $103 million worldwide against a budget of $18 million. The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Cinematography.

Birdman is a film that has resonated with audiences of all ages. It is a funny, thought-provoking, and visually stunning film that explores the human condition in a unique and insightful way.

The Lobster (2015)

The Lobster (2015) is a science fiction black comedy-drama film written and directed by Yorgos Lanthimos. The film stars Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz, Jessica Barden, Olivia Colman, Ashley Jensen, Ariane Labed, Angeliki Papoulia, and John C. Reilly.

The film is set in a dystopian future where single people are given 45 days to find a romantic partner or be transformed into an animal of their choice. David (Colin Farrell) is a man who has recently been dumped by his wife. He is sent to the Hotel, where he is given 45 days to find a partner.

At the Hotel, David meets a variety of other single people, including a woman who is only attracted to people with limps (Jessica Barden), a man who is obsessed with nosebleeds (John C. Reilly), and a woman who is only attracted to people who are mute (Léa Seydoux).

David struggles to find a partner at the Hotel. He is attracted to a woman named Rachel (Rachel Weisz), but she is only attracted to men who are stronger than her. David tries to become stronger, but he is unable to defeat Rachel in a fight.

In the end, David decides to escape from the Hotel with Rachel. They join a group of rebels who live in the woods. The rebels have rejected the Hotel’s rules and are living freely.

David and Rachel fall in love, but their relationship is difficult. They are constantly arguing and fighting. In the end, they decide to blind themselves so that they will only be attracted to each other’s personalities.

Themes:

  • Love and relationships: The Lobster is a film about love and relationships. The film explores the different ways that people find love and the challenges of maintaining relationships.
  • Society and conformity: The Lobster is also a film about society and conformity. The film satirizes the way that society pressures people to conform to certain standards of beauty and behavior.
  • Choice and freedom: The Lobster is a film about choice and freedom. The film explores the importance of having choices in life and the challenges of living in a world where our choices are limited.

Legacy:

The Lobster was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $18 million worldwide against a budget of $4 million. The film won the Jury Prize at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival.

Lady Bird (2017)

Lady Bird (2017) is a coming-of-age comedy-drama film written and directed by Greta Gerwig in her solo directorial debut. The film stars Saoirse Ronan as Christine “Lady Bird” McPherson, a high school senior in Sacramento, California, who longs to leave her hometown and attend college on the East Coast.

Lady Bird is a complex and relatable character. She is intelligent, ambitious, and passionate, but she is also insecure and self-absorbed. She has a strained relationship with her mother, Marion (Laurie Metcalf), who is fiercely protective of her daughter but often struggles to understand her.

Lady Bird’s senior year is full of ups and downs. She experiences her first heartbreak, navigates the complex social dynamics of high school, and tries to figure out what she wants to do with her future. She also learns to appreciate her family and friends more than she ever did before.

Lady Bird is a beautifully written and directed film that captures the universal experience of growing up. It is a film that will stay with you long after you have seen it.

Themes:

  • Coming of age: Lady Bird is a classic coming-of-age story about a young woman learning to navigate the world and find her place in it.
  • Mother-daughter relationships: The film also explores the complex relationship between Lady Bird and her mother. Their relationship is often strained, but they ultimately love and support each other.
  • Self-discovery: Lady Bird is a journey of self-discovery for the title character. She learns more about herself, her family, and her community as she prepares to leave for college.

Legacy:

Lady Bird was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $79 million worldwide against a budget of $10 million. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress for Saoirse Ronan, and Best Supporting Actress for Laurie Metcalf.

Parasite (2019)

Parasite (2019) is a South Korean drama-comedy thriller film directed by Bong Joon-ho. The film stars Song Kang-ho, Lee Sun-kyun, Cho Yeo-jeong, Park So-dam, Choi Woo-shik, Park Myung-hoon, Lee Jung-eun, Kim Hye-jin, and Jung Ziso.

The film tells the story of the Kim family, a poor family who schemes to become employed by the wealthy Park family by posing as unrelated, highly qualified individuals.

Parasite is a darkly funny and suspenseful film that explores the themes of class inequality, social injustice, and the exploitation of the poor by the rich. It is a thought-provoking and timely film that has resonated with audiences around the world.

Themes:

  • Class inequality: Parasite is a film about the stark contrast between the rich and the poor in South Korea. The Kim family lives in a cramped semi-basement apartment, while the Park family lives in a luxurious mansion. The film shows how the rich and the poor live in two completely different worlds, with very little interaction between them.
  • Social injustice: Parasite is also a film about social injustice and the exploitation of the poor by the rich. The Kim family is forced to scheme and lie in order to get ahead, while the Park family takes their privilege for granted. The film shows how the system is rigged in favor of the rich, and how the poor are often left to fend for themselves.
  • The exploitation of the poor: Parasite is also a film about the exploitation of the poor by the rich. The Park family relies on the Kim family to do all of their dirty work, and they pay them very little for it. The film shows how the rich often exploit the poor without any regard for their well-being.

Legacy:

Parasite was a critical and commercial success, grossing over $266 million worldwide against a budget of $11 million. It won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best International Feature Film.

Parasite is a landmark film that has made history as the first non-English-language film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. It is a must-see for fans of drama-comedy, thrillers, and films that explore important social issues.

Indiecinema

Indiecinema

Hundreds of Movies and Documentaries Selected Without Limits

New movies every week. Watch on any device, without any ads. Cancel at any time.