The Most Important Russian Filmmakers

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The history of Russian filmmakers is rich and varied, with films that have helped define cinematic language and influenced cinema around the world.

Russian cinema has its origins in the 1890s when the first films were shown in Russia. The first Russian films were documentaries and short entertainment films, but longer and more ambitious films soon began to be made as well.

Russian directors and the history of cinema

The heyday of Russian cinema is considered to be the period between the 1920s and 1930s. During this period, Russian cinema produced some of the most important and influential films of all time, such as Sergey’s “Battleship Potemkin” Ejzenštejn, “The Messiah” by Jakov Protazanov and “The Mother” by Vsevolod Pudovkin.

Russian films of this period were characterized by an innovative use of cinematic language, with techniques such as editing, perspective and light. Russian films of this period were also strongly political and social, often dealing with themes such as revolution, war and poverty.

Russian cinema continued to be important even after the Second World War, with films such as Andrei Tarkovsky’s “Ivan’s Childhood” and Andrei Tarkovsky’s “Like in a Mirror”.

Today, Russian cinema is still alive and well, and continues to produce interesting and innovative films. Some of today’s most prominent Russian directors are Andrei Zvyagintsev, Kirill Serebrennikov and Aleksej German Jr.

Here are some of the most important Russian films of all time:

  • The battleship Potëmkin (1925) by Sergej Ėjzenštejn
  • The Messiah (1926) by Yakov Protazanov
  • The Mother (1926) by Vsevolod Pudovkin
  • Ivan’s Childhood (1962) di Andrej Tarkovskij
  • Like in a mirror (1975) by Andrei Tarkovsky
  • Stalker (1979) by Andrei Tarkovsky
  • The White Sun of the Desert (1970) by Vladimir Motyl
  • The Master and Margarita (1994) by Aleksandr Sokurov
  • The Return (2003) by Andrei Zvyagintsev
  • L’isola (2006) in Pavel Lungin

Russian cinema has had a profound impact on cinema from all over the world. The innovative techniques and strong themes of Russian films have helped define the cinematic language and have influenced directors from all over the world. Russian cinema is a precious cultural heritage and continues to be a source of inspiration for filmmakers and cinephiles around the world.

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The most important Russian directors

Here is a list of the most important Masters of Russian cinema. These directors helped define the cinematic language and influenced cinema around the world. Their innovative techniques and the strong themes of their films have made Russian cinema a valuable cultural heritage and a source of inspiration for filmmakers and cinephiles around the world.

Sergei Eisenstein

russian-filmmakers-Eisenstein

Sergey Eisenstein was a famous Soviet film director and film theorist. Born January 23, 1898 in Riga, in the then Russian Empire (now Latvia), and died February 11, 1948 in Moscow, Soviet Union, Eisenstein is considered one of the pioneers of modern cinematic language and one of the most influential directors in the history of the cinema.

During the years of the Russian Revolution and the aftermath, Eisenstein developed a passion for theater and cinema, initially studying architecture and then entering the Academy of Fine Arts in Petrograd (now St. Petersburg). This architectural training greatly influenced his approach to cinema, as Eisenstein paid great attention to visual composition, use of space and mass dynamics in his filmmaking.

One of his most famous and influential works was “Strike” (Russian: “Стачка”, transliterated as “Stachka”) from 1925, a silent film which tells the story of a strike of workers in a factory and their struggles against the repression. With this film, Ėjzenštejn introduced the innovative use of editing, creating dynamic and engaging sequences to arouse a strong emotional impact in the viewer. This concept, known as “montage of attractions,” has become a cornerstone of film theory and practice.

Eisenstein is also particularly famous for his 1925 masterpiece “Battleship Potemkin” (Russian: “Броненосец Потёмкин”, transliterated as “Bronenosets Potyomkin”). This film, based on the events of the uprising of a crew of a Russian warship in 1905, it was unanimously recognized as one of the best films in the history of cinema. The famous ‘climbing the Odessa steps’ sequence is an example of innovative editing and the use of visual language to create intense emotional impact.

Eisenstein also directed other notable films, such as “October” (1928), about the October Revolution of 1917, and “The Leningraders” (1938), a biography of revolutionary leader Leon Trotsky.

In addition to his directing career, Ėjzenštejn has written several theoretical essays on cinema, significantly contributing to the reflection on the potential and nature of cinematic art.

His work was instrumental in the development of cinema as an art form and its impact extended far beyond the borders of the Soviet Union. Ejzenštejn is regarded as a major figure in world cinema and his legacy continues to influence filmmakers and film scholars today.

Dziga Vertov

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Dziga Vertov was a Soviet film director, film theorist and documentary maker, known for his innovative and experimental approach to filmmaking. His real name was Denis Arkadievich Kaufman, but he adopted the pseudonym “Dziga Vertov,” which can be translated as “twisting” or “circling.”

Born on January 2, 1896 in Białystok, in the then Russian Empire (now in Poland), and died on February 12, 1954 in Moscow, in the Soviet Union, Vertov is considered one of the forerunners of documentary cinema and truth cinema.

Her film career began in the early 1920s when she began working with her brother Mikhail Kaufman, also a cinematographer and camera operator. Together, they produced some of the most influential films of the period. Dziga Vertov’s most famous work is “Man with a Movie Camera” (1929), an experimental documentary with no defined plot, showing a day in the life of a Soviet city from the perspective of a camera operator.

“Man with a Movie Camera” is known for its innovative approach to staging and editing. Vertov used a variety of visual and sound techniques to explore the potential of cinematic language. The film is a pioneering example of rapid editing, shooting from unusual angles, time-lapse, split-screen and other techniques which sought to capture the frenetic pace of urban life and celebrate the power of cinema as a medium of representation of reality.

In addition to “Man with a Movie Camera”, Vertov directed other significant documentaries, such as “Kino-eye” (1924) and “Three songs about Lenin” (1934). Furthermore, he has been a proponent of the theory of the “kino-eye,” a concept that emphasizes the filmmaker’s active role in observing and capturing reality, comparing it to the eye of the camera as an omniscient and objective eye.

However, due to the growing ideological pressure in the Stalinist period, Vertov found it difficult to continue his film work. His later years were marked by a rejection of his experimental style and a shift towards more conventional productions, such as educational films and news reports.

Despite the challenges and criticisms, Dziga Vertov is regarded as a revolutionary figure in the field of documentary filmmaking and has left a lasting imprint on cinematic practice. His films and experimental approach continue to influence filmmakers and film theorists today.

Lev Kulešov

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Lev Kuleshov was a prominent Soviet film director and film theorist, recognized for his contributions to the development of film editing theory and the art of cinema. Born January 13, 1899 in Tambov, Russia, and died March 29, 1970 in Moscow, Kuleshov was a central figure in the Soviet cinematic avant-garde of the 1920s.

Kuleshov was a leading exponent of the film movement known as “Kino-eye” or “intellectual montage”. He initially worked with director and film theorist Pudovkin and actor and director Moskvin at the Moscow Film Institute (VGIK). Together, they explored and developed the concept of editing and its ability to create meaning and emotion in film.

One of Kuleshov’s most famous and revealing experiments is known as the “Kuleshov Effect”. This experiment involved creating a short film that showed the same actor’s expressionless face framed alongside several images of different objects, such as a plate of food, a little girl in a coffin, and a woman reclining on a couch. The audience to which the film was shown attributed different emotions to the actor’s face depending on the context in which it was placed. For example, if the face followed the image of the plate of food, the audience interpreted an expression of hunger; if he followed the image of the coffin, the audience interpreted an expression of sadness. This experiment demonstrated how editing could influence viewers’ perception and interpretation, highlighting the power of visual manipulation in cinema.

In addition, Kulešov directed several films, including “Ingenjör Pryschibåtsjovs dröm” (Engineer Prischibatschev’s vision) in 1918, considered one of the first films of the Soviet avant-garde.

In addition to his directing career, Kuleshov continued to teach film theory and editing within VGIK, influencing many students and emerging filmmakers.

Lev Kuleshov is recognized as one of the founding fathers of Soviet cinema, and his work on image editing and manipulation has had a lasting impact on film theory and practice. His contribution was fundamental to the creation of cinematic language and to the evolution of cinema as an art form.

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Vsevolod Pudovkin

russian-filmmakers

Vsevolod Pudovkin was a Soviet director, screenwriter and film theorist, considered one of the leading exponents of the cinematic avant-garde of the 1920s. Born on February 16, 1893 in Penza, Russia and died on June 30, 1953 in Jurmala, in the then Soviet Union (now Latvia), Pudovkin left a significant footprint in the field of cinema through his work as a director and his contributions to film editing theory.

Pudovkin was an early student of the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK), where he studied alongside other prominent Soviet filmmakers such as Lev Kuleshov and Sergei Eisenstein. He worked with these colleagues, influencing each other in the fields of film theory and editing.

One of Pudovkin’s most important and influential works was the film “Mother” (Mat’ in 1926), based on a story by Maxim Gorky. This film, a powerful story about the suffering and courage of a peasant mother during the Russian Revolution, was acclaimed for its emotional editing technique and the way it evoked empathy and emotional involvement in viewers.

Pudovkin’s editing technique was based on the theory of “montage of attractions”, similar to Eisenstein’s, but with some substantial differences. While Eisenstein aimed to create meaning through contrasting images, Pudovkin sought to arouse emotion through sequential editing. With this method, he managed to create an emotional and immersive flow that connected the different scenes to amplify the overall emotional effect of the film.

In addition to “Mother”, Pudovkin’s other important works include “The End of St. Petersburg” (Konec Sankt-Peterburga, 1927) and “The Storm Over Russia” (Un’jkha, 1934). These films explored social and political themes and have continued to influence filmmakers around the world.

Pudovkin is not only a prolific director, but also an author of books on film theory, with works such as “Film Technique and Film Acting” (1929) and “Film Acting” (1933), which contributed to the dissemination and deepening of cinematic techniques.

His legacy has been significant in the field of cinema, and his ideas about staging and editing have been studied and applied by generations of filmmakers and film theorists.

Aleksandr Dovzhenko

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Aleksandr Dovzhenko (or Oleksandr Dovzhenko) was a Ukrainian director and screenwriter, considered one of the great masters of Soviet cinema. Born September 10, 1894 in the Sosnyca region, Russian Empire (now the territory of Ukraine), and died November 25, 1956 in Moscow, Soviet Union, Dovzhenko left a significant mark on the world of cinema through his films experimental films and his contributions to auteur cinema.

After studying agriculture, Dovzhenko moved to Moscow in the 1920s to study film at the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK). His academic training in agriculture would influence his approach to cinema, particularly with regard to the representation of peasant life and rural themes in his films.

One of his most famous films is “Zemlja” (The Land) from 1930, a majestic work that deals with the life of Ukrainian peasants during the forced collectivization in the 1930s. With “The Earth”, Dovzhenko established himself as one of the leading Soviet directors and acquired international fame. The film is known for its visual poetics, innovative use of staging, and ability to evoke a deep sense of patriotism and spirituality connected to the land and nature.

Dovzhenko’s other notable film is ‘Arsenal’ (1929), a pioneering work in Soviet cinema chronicling the events of the Bolshevik Revolution in Kiev in 1918. ‘Arsenal’ was praised for its bold formal experiments and engaging storytelling .

Dovzhenko continued to make other films spanning various genres and styles. Some of his other notable works include ‘Zvenigora’ (1928) and ‘Ivan’ (1932).

Dovženko’s cinema was characterized by a strong attachment to Ukrainian folklore and culture, combined with poetic and symbolic research. He sought to create an authentic and original cinematic language, pushing the boundaries of the cinematic art of the time.

After the initial avant-garde period, Dovzhenko had some conflicts with the Soviet authority regarding his artistic vision, and many of his later films suffered from censorships and cuts.

Despite the political challenges, his work has had a lasting impact on world cinematography. Today, Aleksandr Dovzhenko is remembered as one of the great masters of Soviet cinema and a pioneer of auteur and experimental cinema. His legacy continues to influence contemporary directors and filmmakers.

Mikhail Romm

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Michail Romm, or Mikhail Romm, was a Soviet film director and screenwriter known for his political and historical films, as well as his involvement in training future filmmakers at the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK). Born December 24, 1901 in Irkutsk, Siberia and died November 1, 1971 in Moscow, Romm left a significant imprint on Soviet cinema and influenced a generation of filmmakers.

After completing his studies at the Moscow Institute of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Romm decided to pursue a film career and enrolled in VGIK. Here he had the opportunity to study with important directors such as Lev Kulešov and Vsevolod Pudovkin, from whom he acquired solid theoretical and technical training on cinema.

His directing career began in the 1920s, but it was in the 1930s and 1940s that Romm reached his artistic maturity. His work was influenced by the political ideology of the Stalinist period, and many of his films are characterized by a strong patriotism and an ideological belonging to the Soviet regime.

One of his most famous films is “Lenin in October” (Lenin v Oktjabre, 1937), a film about the October Revolution of 1917 and the figure of Vladimir Lenin. The film was a great success and Romm won the Stalin prize in 1941.

Another significant film by Romm is “The Ordinary Fascism” (Obyknovennyj fashizm, 1965), a historical and documentary work that explores the crimes of Nazism and fascism. The film deals with important themes related to war and historical memory, becoming an important contribution to anti-fascist cinema.

In addition to his work as a filmmaker, Romm played an important role as a teacher at VGIK, where he trained generations of filmmakers and shared his experience and passion for cinema.

While Romm’s work was influenced by the political propaganda of the Soviet regime, it was also characterized by a search for cinematic language and an innovative approach to staging. His career has been long and diverse, and his films have continued to be studied and appreciated both in Russia and internationally.

Grigory Chukhrai

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Grigoriy Naumovitch Chukhrai (Russian: Григорий Наумович Чухрай) was a Russian director and screenwriter, known for his deep and intense cinematic works. Born on May 23, 1921 in Melitopol, in the then Soviet Union (now Ukraine), and died on October 28, 2001 in Moscow, Chukhrai has left an important legacy in Russian and international cinema.

Chukhrai started his film career as a stage actor but later made the leap into directing and screenwriting. His directorial debut film was ‘The Last Stake’ (Poslednij izotop, 1951), which was a critical success and gained international acclaim.

However, it was his second film, “The Circle of Destiny” (Ballada o soldiere, 1959), that brought him international fame and critical acclaim. The film tells the story of a young Soviet soldier during World War II and his efforts to return home to see his mother. The film deals with universal themes such as war, humanity and sacrifice, and is considered one of the masterpieces of Soviet cinema.

After the success of ‘Circle of Fate’, Chukhrai went on to make other successful films, such as ‘All My Joy’ (Vsyo moi radosti, 1967) and ‘White Desert Sun’ (Belyy solntse pustyni, 1970) , the latter one of the most beloved Russian films of all time. These films solidified his reputation as one of the great Russian directors of the 20th century.

In addition to his film career, Chukhrai was involved in the cultural politics of the Soviet Union, serving as a deputy of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union and as a member of the Writers’ Union of the Soviet Union.

Grigory Chukhrai was a versatile filmmaker who was able to tackle a wide range of themes and genres, from war to drama, from action cinema to historical cinema. His work is characterized by a deep human sensibility and a close attention to the emotional details of his characters. His legacy in Russian cinema is enduring, and his films continue to be studied and enjoyed by moviegoers and filmmakers around the world.

Sergei Paradjanov

Sergei-Paradjanov

Sergei Parajanov was a Soviet and Armenian filmmaker, painter, set designer and poet of Armenian descent, known for his idiosyncratic and visually rich films, which often drew on Armenian folk art and mythology. He is considered one of the most original and influential filmmakers of the 20th century, and his films were often censored by the Soviet authorities.

Parajanov was born in Tbilisi, Georgia, on January 9, 1924, to Armenian parents. He showed an early interest in art and literature, and he studied painting at the Yerevan Academy of Fine Arts. In 1945, he began working as a set and costume designer for the Armenian State Theater, and he also began to make short films.

Parajanov’s first feature film, The Color of Pomegranates (1969), was a critical and commercial success, and it won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival. The film is a surreal and poetic portrait of the Armenian poet Sayat-Nova, and it is renowned for its use of vibrant colors, intricate costumes, and stylized dance sequences.

Despite the success of The Color of Pomegranates, Parajanov’s subsequent films were often censored by the Soviet authorities. His second feature film, The Legend of Suram Fortress (1985), was banned for its portrayal of religious themes and its criticism of the Soviet regime. Parajanov was also arrested and imprisoned from 1973 to 1977 on charges of homosexuality.

Aleksei German

Aleksei-German

Aleksei German (1938-2013) was a Soviet and Russian filmmaker and screenwriter, known for his complex and multi-layered films, often set in a dystopian atmosphere. His films are characterized by an innovative use of narrative, editing, and cinematography, and have had a profound impact on numerous filmmakers, including Andrei Tarkovsky, Béla Tarr, and Jim Jarmusch.

German was born in Leningrad, Russia, in 1938. His father was the writer Yuri German, who had a profound influence on his artistic development. German began studying cinema at Leningrad State University in 1956, and graduated in 1960.

German’s early films, including The Seventh Companion (1967) and Trial on the Road (1971), were characterized by a realistic and documentary approach. However, starting with his third film, Twenty Days Without War (1976), German began to develop a more personal and experimental style.

German’s films were often censored by Soviet authorities. His film My Friend Ivan Lapshin (1984) was banned for its portrayal of a Soviet officer as a complex and contradictory individual. German was also arrested and imprisoned for a short time in 1987.

Aleksandr Ptushko

Aleksandr-Ptushko

Aleksandr Ptushko (1900-1973) was a Soviet filmmaker, animator, and screenwriter. He was awarded the Stalin Prize of the Second Degree in 1947 and the title of People’s Artist of the USSR in 1969.

Ptushko was born in Lugansk, Ukraine, on April 19, 1900. He studied art and set design at the Moscow Academy of Fine Arts. In 1927, he began his film career working as a set designer and costume designer for the Moscow State Theater.

In 1935, Ptushko directed his first feature-length animated film, Novyj Gulliver (New Gulliver). The film was a success and helped to establish Ptushko as one of the pioneers of Soviet animation.

Ptushko continued to direct animated and live-action films for the rest of his career. His films are known for their innovative use of special effects and for their richness of imagery and fantasy.

Grigoriy Chukhray

Grigoriy-Chukhray

Grigory Chukhray (23 May 1921 – 28 October 2001) was a Soviet and Russian film director and screenwriter. He is best known for his 1959 film Ballad of a Soldier, which is considered one of the greatest Soviet war films ever made.

Chukhray was born in Melitopol, Ukraine, in 1921. His father was an engineer and his mother was a teacher. Chukhray began studying cinema at the Moscow State Institute of Cinematography in 1940, but was interrupted by the war. After the war, he graduated in 1947.

Chukhray’s early films, including The Forty-First (1956) and Clear Skies (1958), were characterized by a realistic and documentary approach. However, beginning with his third film, Ballad of a Soldier, Chukhray began to develop a more personal and poetic style.

Ballad of a Soldier is a war film that tells the story of Alyosha Skvortsov, a Soviet soldier who returns home after the war to find his family destroyed. The film is known for its moving story, its lyrical cinematography, and its iconic soundtrack.

Boris Barnet

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Boris Barnet (5 July 1902 – 8 December 1964) was a Soviet film director, screenwriter, and cinematographer. He is considered one of the key figures of Soviet cinema in the 1920s and 1930s.

Barnet was born in Odessa, Russian Empire, on 5 July 1902. He began his career in the early 1920s as an assistant director and cinematographer. His directorial debut came in 1924 with the film The Merry Lad.

Barnet’s early films were characterized by their innovative use of camera and editing techniques, and their focus on social and psychological themes. He was particularly adept at capturing the atmosphere and everyday life of the Soviet people.

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Eldar Ryazanov

Eldar Aleksandrovich Ryazanov (Russian: Эльдар Александрович Рязанов; 18 November 1927 – 30 November 2015) was a Soviet and Russian film director, screenwriter, poet, actor, and pedagogue. He was one of the most popular and successful filmmakers in the Soviet Union and Russia, and his comedies are still enjoyed by audiences worldwide.

Ryazanov was born in Samara, Russia, on November 18, 1927. He studied at the All-Union State Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) in Moscow, graduating in 1954. His early films were documentaries, but he soon turned to making feature films.

In 1961, Ryazanov directed his first feature film, Dolgoe proshchanie (The Long Farewell), which was a critical and commercial success. The film was followed by a series of popular comedies, including Zigzag udachi (The 22nd of June, 1941) (1961), Stariki-razboyniki (Old Men of the Guard) (1965), Skazka o troike (The Merry-Go-Round) (1966), Nepodsudimaya (Unjustly Accused) (1968), Samovarskiye rasskazy (Teahouse Stories) (1970), and Smuglyanka (The Hussy) (1972).

Ryazanov’s comedies were known for their sharp social satire, their witty dialogue, and their memorable characters. They often explored themes of everyday life, love, and marriage in the Soviet Union.and Dziga Vertov. It also had a significant impact on the development of film editing in general.

Evgeny Bauer

Evgeny-Bauer

Evgeny Franzevich Bauer (Russian: Евгений Францевич Бауэр; 22 January 1865 – 9 June 1917) was a Russian silent film director and screenwriter. He is considered one of the most important directors of early Russian cinema.

Bauer was born in Moscow on 22 January 1865. He studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, and then worked as a stage designer and actor. He began directing films in the early 1910s, and quickly became known for his atmospheric and psychological dramas.

Bauer’s early films were characterized by their use of innovative camera techniques, such as close-ups and flashbacks. He was also a master of using lighting and décor to create mood and atmosphere.

Mikhail Kalatozov

Mikhail-Kalatozov

Mikhail Kalatozov (1903-1973) was a Soviet film director, screenwriter, and cinematographer. He is best known for his film The Cranes Are Flying (1957), which won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Kalatozov was born in Tbilisi, Georgia, in 1903. He studied cinema at the State Institute of Cinematography in Moscow, graduating in 1934. His early films were documentaries, but he soon turned to making fiction films.

Kalatozov’s most famous film is The Cranes Are Flying, a romantic drama set during World War II. The film follows the story of a young woman, Veronika, who promises her fiancé, Boris, to wait for him until his death. When Boris is killed in the war, Veronika commits suicide. The film is known for its evocative imagery and its innovative use of montage.

Stanislav Govorukhin

Stanislav-Govorukhin

Stanislav Sergeyevich Govorukhin was a Soviet and Russian film director, actor, screenwriter, producer, and politician. He was born on March 29, 1936 in Berezniki, Perm Krai, Russia, and died on June 14, 2018 in Barvikha, Moscow Oblast.

Govorukhin began his career as an actor, appearing in films and theater in the 1960s and 1970s. He made his directorial debut in 1975 with the film “The Meeting Place Cannot Be Changed”. He went on to direct a number of successful films, including “The Rifleman of the Voroshilov Regiment” (1999), “The End of a Beautiful Epoch” (2015), and “Weekend” (2013).

Govorukhin’s films are often characterized by a dramatic tone and address important social and political themes. His films have been critically acclaimed and have won numerous awards, including the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival for “The Rifleman of the Voroshilov Regiment”.

Govorukhin was also an active politician. He was a member of the Russian Parliament from 1993 to 2003 and served as Minister of Culture from 2000 to 2004.

Nikolai Dostal

Nikolai-Dostal

Nikolai Dostal was a Russian film director and screenwriter born on May 21, 1946 in Moscow. He studied journalism at Moscow State University and began working for Mosfilm studios in 1964.

His directorial debut came in 1987 with the film “Šura i Prosvirnjak”. He went on to direct a number of successful films, including “Oblako-raj” (1990), “Melki bes” (1995), “Kolja – perekati pole” (2005), “Petja po doroge v Tsarstvije Nebesnoje” (2009), “Raskol” (2011), and “Monahh i bes” (2016).

Dostal’s films are often characterized by a dark and melancholic tone and a strong attention to detail. They explore themes such as family, Russian society, and human nature.

Dostal was an important Russian director and his work was critically acclaimed. He won numerous awards, including the Nika Award for Best Film for “Oblako-raj” and “Kolja – perekati pole”.

Andrei Tarkovsky

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Andrei Tarkovsky (Russian: Андрей Арсеньевич Тарковский) was one of the greatest Russian directors and screenwriters of the 20th century, known for his experimental, poetic and philosophical films. Born April 4, 1932 in Zavrazhye, in the then Soviet Union (now part of Russia), and died December 29, 1986 in Paris, France, Tarkovsky left an indelible mark on world cinema and his work is considered among the most influential and visionary in the history of cinema.

Tarkovsky studied film directing at the Moscow Film Institute (VGIK) and began his career as a director during the 1960s. His first feature film, “Ivan’s Childhood” (Ivanovo detstvo, 1962), was critically well received and was awarded the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival.

His second film, “Andrei Rublev” (Andrey Rublev, 1966), is considered his masterpiece. This film is a monumental and meditative reenactment of the life of the celebrated icon painter Andrei Rublev in the Russian Middle Ages. “Andrei Rublev” suffered censorship and restrictions by the Soviet authorities due to its religious themes and daring formal experiments, but has become a cult film over the years and is recognized as one of the great masterpieces of history of the cinema.

Tarkovsky is also known for other important films, such as “Solaris” (1972), a philosophical science fiction film based on the novel by Stanisław Lem, and “The Mirror” (Zerkalo, 1975), an experimental work that explores memories, poetry and the nature of memory.

Throughout his career, Tarkovsky frequently ran into problems with censorship and opposition from the Soviet authorities due to his experimental art and his criticism of official ideology. In 1982, he left the Soviet Union and settled in Europe, where he continued to work on his films.

Tarkovsky’s cinema is characterized by deep spiritual and philosophical research, as well as a strong concern for nature, time and memory. His works are filled with symbolism, metaphors and iconic imagery, often prompting profound questions about the human condition and our relationship to the world.

His influence in world cinema has been vast, and many contemporary filmmakers and artists have recognized his impact on their craft. His oeuvre continues to be studied, debated and admired, and Andrei Tarkovsky is considered a true cinematic genius.

Nikita Mikhalkov

Registi-russi-Michalkov

Nikita Michalkov (Russian: Никита Михалков) is a renowned Russian director, actor and screenwriter, known for his dramatic and historical films. Born on October 21, 1945 in Moscow, Soviet Union (now Russia), Michalkov comes from a family of artists and intellectuals and followed in the footsteps of his father, the famous poet and screenwriter Sergei Michalkov.

Nikita Michalkov’s career in cinema began in the 1960s, but it was in the 1970s and 1980s that he achieved fame as a director. One of his most famous films is “Oblomov” (1980), a faithful transposition of the homonymous novel by Ivan Goncharov. The film is a reflection on the apathy and resignation of the Russian aristocracy of the time and gained international recognition, winning the Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival.

Another notable film by Michalkov is “Urga – Territory of Love” (1991), a work set in Mongolia which tells the story of a Russian truck driver and his interaction with the local population. This film earned him the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film in 1994.

Throughout his career, Michalkov has addressed a variety of topics, including historical and political ones, often highlighting the complexity of Russian society and its culture. His film “The Sun Even at Night” (1990) is an example of this, being set in the 19th century during the French occupation of Russia.

Besides directing, Michalkov is also a successful actor and has starred in several of his own films as well as appearing in international productions. He is also involved in various cultural and political activities in Russia.

However, Michalkov is not without controversy. He has been a supporter of the Russian government and has often expressed conservative views, which have drawn criticism from some sectors of the Russian public and artistic community.

In general, Nikita Michalkov is considered one of the great contemporary Russian directors and his work has left a significant mark on the Russian and international cinematic scene. His ability to tackle complex subjects and explore human psychology has made him a respected and influential filmmaker.

Aleksandr Sokurov

Registi-russi-Sokurov

Aleksandr Sokurov (Russian: Александр Николаевич Сокуров) is a renowned Russian film director and screenwriter, known for his experimental, slow and symbolism-rich films. Born on June 14, 1951 in Podorvikha, Altai Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, Soviet Union (now Russia), Sokurov has earned an international reputation for his unique and poetic vision of cinema.

His film career began in the 1970s, but it was in the 1990s and early 2000s that he achieved international recognition with some of his most acclaimed films.

One of his most famous films is “Mother and Son” (Mat’ i syn, 1997), a film that explores the relationship between a dying mother and her son. The film is known for its intense and evocative cinematography and its use of time dilation, creating an atmosphere of contemplation and introspection.

Another masterpiece of Sokurov is “Faust” (2011), a reinterpretation of the play by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. The film won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and cemented Sokurov’s reputation as one of the most daring and innovative directors of his time.

Sokurov is also known for his film “Russian Ark” (Russkij kovcheg, 2002), shot in one long take of 96 minutes, without any cuts. This film is an ode to Russian history and culture, and its unique style and technical virtuosity made it a particularly outstanding cinematic work.

Sokurov’s filmography often deals with historical, political and philosophical themes, and his films are known for deep reflections on the human condition, history and art. His style is characterized by a distinctive use of light, shadow and color, as well as a particular attention to visual composition.

In addition to his directing work, Sokurov has also written books and taught and lectured on cinema.

Aleksandr Sokurov is considered one of the most original and influential directors of contemporary cinema. His work has been awarded at numerous international festivals and has gained wide recognition for its stylistic audacity and the depth of its content. His contribution to Russian and world cinema has been extraordinary, and his legacy will continue to inspire and influence future generations of filmmakers.

Andrey Zvyagintsev

russian-filmmakers-Zvyagintsev

Andrey Zvyagintsev is a Russian director and screenwriter known for his drama movies and intense, which address social, political and human issues in a profound and reflective way. Born on February 6, 1964 in Novosibirsk, in the then Soviet Union (now Russia), Zvyagintsev has gained international recognition and won numerous awards for his cinematic works.

Zvyagintsev’s career in cinema began in the early 2000s. His directorial debut was the film “The Return” (Vozvrashchenie, 2003), which was acclaimed by critics and won the prestigious Golden Lion award at the Venice. The film tells the story of two teenage brothers who see their father again after many years of absence and embark on a journey with him, dealing with themes of growth, family relationships and acceptance.

Subsequently, Zvyagintsev directed “The Obstinate” (Izgnanie, 2007), a psychological drama based on William Saroyan’s novel “The Hero”. The film earned a nomination for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

One of his most famous and acclaimed films is “Leviathan” (Leviafan, 2014), which won the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Film and was nominated for an Oscar in the same category. The film is a sharp critique of contemporary Russian society, touching on issues of corruption, abuse of power and the fight for justice. “Leviathan” also won the Best Screenplay Award at the Cannes Film Festival.

Other notable films by Zvyagintsev include ‘Loveless’ (Nelyubov, 2017), which tells the story of a divorced couple searching for their missing son, and ‘Djungel’ (Dyukhan, 2022), based on the novel by Georgi Mchedlishvili and set in Georgia of the 19th century.

Zvyagintsev’s works are characterized by attention to detail, care in photography and profound exploration of human and social dynamics. His films often reflect the challenges and contradictions of Russian society and people’s sense of alienation and disillusionment.

Andrey Zvyagintsev is one of the most important contemporary Russian directors and his work is appreciated internationally. With his films, he continues to explore universal themes and to inspire profound reflections from audiences and critics.

Kirill Serebrennikov

russian-filmmakers-Serebrennikov

Kirill Serebrennikov is a Russian theater and film director, screenwriter and producer, known for his creativity and innovative spirit in the field of visual and performing arts. Born on September 7, 1969 in Rostov-on-Don, Russia, Serebrennikov has gained international fame and recognition for his provocative and controversial works.

Serebrennikov studied acting and theater directing at the State Institute of Performing Arts in Moscow and later worked with leading Russian theatres, including the Gogol Center Theater which he directed and transformed into a renowned avant-garde theater and cultural centre.

In the field of cinema, Serebrennikov has directed several acclaimed films. One of his best-known films is “The Student” (Uchenik, 2016), based on a play by Marius von Mayenburg. The film tells the story of a troubled boy who becomes obsessed with religion and creates tension at his school. “The Student” won the Francois Chalais Award at the Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for the Un Certain Regard Award.

Serebrennikov has also been involved in controversial and often criticized projects by the Russian government. In 2017, he was arrested and charged with embezzling funds intended for a theater project. His arrest sparked international outcry and led to a debate about freedom of expression and artistic censorship in Russia.

Despite challenges and political opposition, Kirill Serebrennikov continued to be an influential and creative figure on the Russian cultural landscape. His work is known for its bold and provocative approach to social and political issues, and has attracted public and critical attention both in Russia and internationally.

Serebrennikov is a committed filmmaker and artist whose work continues to spark debate and discussion about contemporary Russian society and freedom of expression. His legacy in the visual and performing arts remains significant, and his fight for artistic freedom and justice has become a symbol of resistance for many in Russia’s cultural arena.

Alexei German Jr.

Aleksej-German

Alexey German Jr. (Russian: Алексей Герман мл.) is a Russian director and screenwriter, son of the famous Soviet director Alexey German Sr. Born on October 1, 1976 in Leningrad (now St. Petersburg), German Jr. is known for his complex and committed films that explore social and political themes and reflect on Russian history and culture.

After studying directing at the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK), German Jr. began his film career in the 1990s. His directorial debut, “The Past” (Proshloe, 1998), received positive critical reception and brought him exposure in the world of Russian cinema.

One of German Jr.’s best-known films is “Bumazhnyy soldat” (Paper Soldier, 2008), which was shortlisted to represent Russia at the Oscars for Best Foreign Language Film. The film is set during the Space Race during the Cold War and deals with themes of scientific ambition and ideological competition.

Another important work of German Jr. is “Pugovitsa” (Under Electric Clouds, 2015), a visionary and complex film set in a post-apocalyptic future, which won the Special Jury Prize at the Berlin Film Festival.

German Jr.’s works are known for their distinctive style, which includes bold use of photography, long shooting times, and non-linear storytelling. His films often reflect on Russia’s historical past and present challenges, exploring the complexities of society and human psychology.

Like his father, Aleksej German Sr., Aleksej German Jr. was influenced by the legacy of Soviet cinema and continued to explore social and political themes in his work. Although his filmography is relatively short compared to other directors, his works have won recognition and awards at international festivals and attracted the attention of cinephiles and critics.

Alexei German Jr. is regarded as one of the most exciting and innovative Russian filmmakers of his generation, and his work is recognized for its depth and complexity. His legacy continues to grow, and we look forward to seeing how his talent develops over time.

Leonid Gaidai

Leonid-Gaidai

Leonid Gaidai (Russian: Леонид Гайдай) was a celebrated Soviet director and screenwriter, best known for his brilliant and popular comedies. Born January 30, 1923 in Svobodny, in the then Soviet Union (now Russia), and died November 19, 1993 in Moscow, Gaidai is considered one of the masters of comedy in Soviet and Russian cinema.

Gaidai studied film directing at the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) and began his film career in the 1950s. His talent for comedy was evident from his earliest films, and over the years he has developed a unique and recognizable style, characterized by hilarious situations, witty dialogues and memorable characters.

One of his most famous films is “Operation Y and other adventures of Shurik” (Operatsiya “Y” i drugie priklyucheniya Shurika, 1965), an episodic comedy with the young student Shurik as the protagonist. The film became a classic and won the hearts of the Soviet audience.

Another notable film of Gaidai is “Il Gusar Ballata” (Ballada o soldier, 1959), a film set during the Russian Civil War, which tells the story of a young soldier and his bravery in battle.

Among Gaidai’s other well-known comedies are “Ivan Vasil’evich Changes His Profession” (Ivan Vasil’evich menyaet professiyu, 1973), in which an ordinary engineer and a 16th-century Russian tsar swap roles over time, and “Kavkazskaya plennitsa, ili Novye priklyucheniya Shurika” (1966), another successful comedy with the character of Shurik.

Gaidai’s comedies were loved by the audience for their clever humor and ability to highlight the absurdities and contradictions of Soviet society. His works are characterized by a lively storytelling, lively directing style and a cast of brilliant actors, among which well-known actors such as Aleksandr Demyanenko, Yuri Nikulin and Andrei Mironov stand out.

His influence in popular culture has been enormous, and his comedies are still loved and enjoyed by many generations of viewers today. Leonid Gaidai remains an iconic figure in Soviet cinema and an unforgettable master of Russian comedy.

Vladimir Butterfly

Vladimir-Motyl

Vladimir Motyl (Russian: Владимир Ильич Мотыль) was a Soviet and Ukrainian film director, screenwriter and actor, best known for his successful films in the 1960s and 1970s. Born January 18, 1927 in Warsaw, Poland and died January 15, 2010 in Moscow, Motyl left a significant imprint on Soviet and Russian cinema.

Motyl studied at the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) and began his career as a director and screenwriter in the 1950s. He achieved great success with his debut film, ‘There Were Two Friends’ (Byli druzya, 1958), which was well received by critics and audiences.

The film for which Motyl is particularly known is “The Path of the Wind” (Doroga na Vetraz’, 1959), a historical drama about the Belarusian resistance against the Nazi occupation during the Second World War. The film became a classic of Soviet cinema and was awarded the Special Jury Prize at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.

Another successful film from Motyl is “Icarus XB-1” (IKARIE XB 1, 1963), a science fiction film that was highly praised for its originality and visually appealing style. The film had a significant impact on science fiction genre in Soviet cinema.

Motyl went on to direct and write several other successful films, including comedies and historical dramas. Some of his other notable works include “Koroleva benzokolonki” (1970), “Special Transport Hospital” (1979), and “How are you, soldier?” (1986).

In addition to his activity as a director and screenwriter, Motyl was also an actor and starred in some films, creating memorable characters.

Although Vladimir Motyl’s name is less well known outside Russia than other contemporary Soviet filmmakers, his contribution to Soviet cinema was significant. His films have dealt with social and political issues, and have been praised for their visual style and engaging narratives. Motyl remained active in film for many decades and his work is still appreciated and studied by cinephiles and critics alike.

cult-movie

Andrei Konchalovskij

Andrei-Konchalovskij

Andrei Konchalovsky (Russian: Андрей Михайлович Кончаловский) is a renowned Russian director, screenwriter and producer, known for his eclectic career and significant contributions to international cinema. Born on August 20, 1937 in Moscow, Soviet Union (now Russia), Konchalovsky worked both in Russia and abroad, earning a reputation for great talent and versatility in the visual arts.

Konchalovsky began his film career in the 1960s and had considerable success with his debut film, “The First Teacher” (Pervyy uchitel, 1965), which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

He went on to direct a number of acclaimed films in the 1970s, including “The Place of Strawberries” (Mesto vstrechi izmenit nelzya, 1979), which won the Special Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Other notable films from this period include “Siberias” (1979), a vast epic about a family in Siberia, and “Runaway Train” (1985), an American film that earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Screenplay .

In the 1990s, Konchalovsky continued to make successful films and expanded his career to include stage and television works. He has received international acclaim for his work in film, theater and television.

Another highlight of his career was his return to Russia in the 2000s, where he directed films such as “Gloss” (2007) and “L’arche Russo” (Russky kovcheg, 2002), the latter an experimental film which explore Russian history through a series of historical and artistic episodes.

Andrei Konchalovsky is known for his technical mastery and his ability to create engaging and visually stunning narratives. His films often deal with deep and complex themes, exploring human nature, history and social issues.

His career has been characterized by a great variety of genres and styles, demonstrating his versatility as a director and his talent for completing different projects. His work has been widely recognized and awarded, making Andrei Konchalovsky one of the most important and respected Russian filmmakers of his time.

Elem Klimov

Elem-Klimov

Elem Klimov (Russian: Элем Климов) was a Soviet and Russian film director and screenwriter, known for his work in drama and war cinema. Born July 9, 1933 in Stalingrad (now Volgograd), Soviet Union, and died October 26, 2003 in Moscow, Klimov left a significant mark on Soviet and world cinema, even though his filmography is relatively short.

Klimov studied film directing at the Moscow Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) and began his career as a director in the 1960s. His debut film, “All for Money” (Chto sluchilos posle menty, 1965), showed his talent and penchant for exploring social and human themes.

However, it was with his second film, “We came from afar” (Idi i smotri, 1985), that Klimov reached the pinnacle of his fame and left an indelible mark on the cinema. This film, set during the Nazi invasion of Belarus during WWII, is a stark and powerful depiction of the horrors and atrocities of war. “We Came From Afar” is known for its striking visual style, disturbing imagery, and candid portrayal of human suffering. The film is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of war cinema and a work of great historical and artistic importance.

After the success of ‘We came from afar’, Klimov worked on another major film, ‘Agony’ (1981), a historical drama based on the life of Russia’s last Tsar, Nicholas II. However, the production of this film was hampered by censorship and political problems, and the film was only released after a series of controversies.

After “Agony”, Klimov directed only one more film, “Return of a Heroine” (1999), before finally retiring from directing. He continued to work in the film industry as a producer and supported other emerging directors.

Elem Klimov remained best known for his work in war films, and his impact on Soviet and Russian cinema was considerable. His works are characterized by a deep sensitivity and a unique ability to explore the complex aspects of the human soul. Although his filmography is relatively short, his talent and artistic contribution remain immortal, and his works continue to be studied and appreciated by cinephiles around the world.

Andrei Zvyagintsev

Andrei-Zvyagintsev

Andrei Zvyagintsev (Russian: Андрей Петрович Звягинцев) is one of the most important and acclaimed contemporary Russian directors, known for his dramatic and intense films, which explore complex and profound themes of the human condition and Russian society. Born on February 6, 1964, in Novosibirsk, Altai Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, Soviet Union (now Russia), Zvyagintsev has earned international recognition for his distinctive style and artistic sensibility.

Zvyagintsev studied acting at the Novosibirsk Institute of Theater Arts and began his career working in theater and television. However, he became internationally known as a film director with his debut film, ‘The Return’ (Vozvrashchenie, 2003). The film tells the story of two teenage brothers who see their father again after many years of absence and embark on a journey with him. “The Return” won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and gained wide acclaim from critics and audiences.

The success of “The Return” launched Zvyagintsev’s career as an internationally renowned director. Subsequently, he directed such films as “The Year of the Executioner” (Izgnanie, 2007), “Elena” (2011), “Leviathan” (Leviafan, 2014) and “Loveless” (Nelyubov, 2017). All of these films have been well received by critics and have received awards and accolades from film festivals around the world.

“Leviathan” was particularly significant in Zvyagintsev’s career, as it won the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film and was nominated for an Academy Award in the same category. The film is a sharp critique of contemporary Russian society, touching on issues of corruption, abuse of power and the struggle for justice.

Zvyagintsev’s styles are noted for his technical mastery, bold use of photography, and attention to visual detail. His films often reflect the challenges and contradictions of Russian and human society, exploring the intricacies of interpersonal relationships and the psychology of his characters.

Andrei Zvyagintsev is one of the most acclaimed and influential filmmakers of his generation. His work has aroused debates and reflections on Russian and human society, and his artistic sensibility and his mastery of storytelling have consecrated him as one of the great masters of contemporary cinema.

Ilya Khrzhanovsky

Ilya-Khrzhanovsky

Ilya Khrzhanovsky is a Russian director and screenwriter known for his innovative and provocative style. He was born on December 11, 1975 in Moscow, Soviet Union (now Russia). Khrzhanovsky has gained international acclaim for his unique and often controversial approach to filmmaking.

After studying at the Russian State Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) in Moscow, Khrzhanovsky made his debut with the short film “Stop” in 2001. However, his major and most talked about work is the film “4” (Chetyre), released in 2004. This film was well received by critics and won several awards in international film festivals.

One of Khrzhanovsky’s best-known and most controversial projects is “Dau”, an ambitious film and stage work. The project began in the late 2000s and was conceived as an immense production combining film and immersive theatre. “Dau” is based on the life of the eminent Soviet physicist Lev Landau, but it is also a social experiment in which the actors were immersed in a simulated living environment that reflected the Soviet Union of the 1930s and 1940s. The project was filmed for many years, involving a large number of people and attracting the attention of the international media and audience.

However, “Dau” has also been the subject of criticism and controversy due to its unorthodox production practices and depiction of controversial situations and issues. The project has sparked ethical debates regarding privacy and the treatment of the actors involved.

Ilya Khrzhanovsky is a highly talented filmmaker known for defying cinematic conventions and creating works that elicit intense reactions from audiences and critics alike. His career has been marked by ambitious and provocative projects that have made him a significant figure in the contemporary film scene.

Vladimir Bortko

Vladimir-Bortko

Vladimir Vladimirovich Bortko (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Бортко; born 7 May 1946) is a Russian film director, screenwriter, producer and politician. He was a member of the State Duma between 2011 and 2021, and was awarded the title of People’s Artist of Russia.

Born in Moscow, Bortko studied at the Karpenko-Kary State University of Theatre, Film and Television in Kyiv. In 1980, he began working as a director for Lenfilm studios in Leningrad. He made his directorial debut in 1975 with the film “Kanal” (The Canal), based on the novel of the same name by Ivan Stadnikov.

Bortko has directed several acclaimed films, including “The Master and Margarita” (2005), a six-part television miniseries based on the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, and “The Idiot” (2003), a four-part television miniseries based on the novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky. He has also directed the films “Taras Bulba” (2009), “Petr Pervyy: Zaveshchanie” (2011), “About Love” (2017), and “Dusha shpiona” (2015).

Bortko’s films are often praised for their historical accuracy and their faithfulness to the source material. He is known for his meticulous attention to detail and his ability to create visually stunning and immersive films.

Alexei Uchitel

Alexei-Uchitel

Alexei Yefimovich Uchitel is a Russian film director, screenwriter, and producer. He was born on August 31, 1951, in Leningrad, Russia.

Uchitel studied cinematography at the VGIK in Moscow and began his film career as a documentary filmmaker. His feature film directorial debut came in 1995 with the film “Giselle’s Mania”.

Uchitel is one of the most important Russian directors of his generation. His films are often characterized by a dark and melancholic tone and a strong attention to detail. They explore themes such as family, Russian society, and human nature.

Uchitel’s films have been critically acclaimed and have won numerous awards, including the Nika Award for Best Film for “His Wife’s Diary” (2000), “The Thief” (2007), and “The Whaler Boy” (2020).

Karen Shakhnazarov

Karen-Shakhnazarov

Karen Shakhnazarov is a Russian film director, screenwriter, and producer. He was born on July 8, 1952, in Krasnodar, Russia.

Shakhnazarov studied cinematography at the VGIK in Moscow and began his film career as an assistant director. His directorial debut came in 1981 with the film “Assa”.

Shakhnazarov is one of the most important and respected Russian directors of his generation. His films are often characterized by a satirical and ironic tone and a strong attention to detail. They explore themes such as politics, Russian society, and human nature.

Shakhnazarov’s films have been critically acclaimed and have won numerous awards, including the Nika Award for Best Film for “Assa” (1987), “Purgatory” (1997), and “The Island” (2006).

Pavel Lungin

Pavel-Lungin

Pavel Lungin (Russian: Па́вел Семёнович Лунги́н; born July 12, 1949) is a Russian film director, screenwriter, and producer. He is sometimes credited as Pavel Loungine (as in the American release of Tycoon). Lungin was awarded the distinction People’s Artist of Russia in 2008.

Lungin studied cinema at the VGIK in Moscow and began his film career as a scriptwriter. His directorial debut came in 1990 with the film “Taxi Blues” (Taksi-Blyuz) starring Pyotr Mamonov. The film won the Best Director Prize at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival. Lungin is known for his socially conscious films, which often address difficult and controversial issues. He has also directed several historical films, including “Tycoon” (2002), a biopic of Russian businessman Boris Berezovsky, and “The Island” (2006), a drama set during the Russian Revolution.

Lungin’s films have been praised for their strong performances, their visual beauty, and their exploration of complex themes. He has won numerous awards for his work, including the Nika Award for Best Director for “Tycoon” and “The Island”.

Georgi Daneliya

Georgi-Daneliya

Georgi Daneliya (August 25, 1930 – April 4, 2019) was a Soviet and Russian film director, screenwriter, and actor of Georgian origin. He is considered one of the most important Soviet and Russian directors of the 20th century.

Daneliya was born in Tbilisi, Georgia, in 1930. He studied cinema at the VGIK in Moscow and began his film career as an assistant director. His directorial debut came in 1965 with the film “Otsaz tridtsat tri” (“Thirty Three”). The film is a comedy that tells the story of a group of musicians who perform a concert in a small village. The film was a critical and commercial success and established Daneliya as one of the most promising directors in Soviet cinema.

Daneliya continued to direct successful films in the years that followed, including “Kak ia proivel eto leto” (“How I Spent This Summer”) (1969), “Ne khorosho, ne plokho” (“Not Bad, Not Good”) (1971), “Mimino” (1977), “Kin-dza-dza!” (1986) and “Osennij marafon” (1979). His films are often characterized by a humorous and satirical tone, but they also explore more serious themes, such as the human condition, politics, and society.

Daneliya was a prolific director and directed over 20 films in his career. His films have been translated into many languages and have received numerous awards, including the Lenin Prize, the Stalin Prize, and the Nika Award.

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